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Scientific American Article From 1959, On Ink-Nib-Paper Relationship



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TenBladeSummitar

An interesting article from Scientific American New Scientist (edited - thanks to those who pointed out the error), 1959, outlining the history of the development of quick-drying fountain pen ink, and how the ink and paper interact to influence perceived feathering or line spread. It also is clear how ink recipes can affect pen components or reliability thereof.

 

http://bit.ly/Science_of_Quick_Drying_Fountain_Pen_Inks

Edited by TenBladeSummitar
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BaronWulfraed

The pages indicate they are from the British "New Scientist", NOT US "Scientific American"

Edited by BaronWulfraed
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silverlifter

Thanks: that was an interesting read!

 

Correction: Scientific American New Scientist :)

Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.

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That was a very interesting read. It essentially outlines the composition of Parker inks such as Superchrome, and reveals the function of their ingredients such as amyl xanthate, which I've often thought was the mysterious Solv-X, plus other puzzles you find in Parker ink patents such as bentonite (clay!).

 

Thank you! I hope plenty of people find this thread and link.

Edited by Tweel

fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
-- John Purdue (1863)

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