Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Pineider


writepen
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello Fellow Members! We will now solve the mystery of the Pineider Limited Edition Mystery Filler! Both the Company and Designer are world-renowned. Since it's beginning in 1774, Pineider has produced prestigious papers, writing instruments, and leather goods for our enjoyment. And the mastermind behind the Mystery Filler, as well as the other prized Pineider pens, is the revered Dante Del Vecchio, recognized as the superstar of fountain pen innovation.

Each Mystery Filler fountain pen has a 14-karat (rose or rhodium plated) gold, proprietary, flexible, quill nib, called Hyperflex, which was designed by Del Vecchio and produced for Pineider by celebrated German nib maker, Bock. The pen's cap features a patented “twist magnetic” lock, (Del Vecchio has earned 18 patents), so that it securely and perfectly closes the pen without pressure or the need for repeated twisting, as is necessary with a threaded pen cap. The polarization of the magnets permits a soft opening and a satisfying closure, so that we can open the pen gently or watch it roll between our fingers until we hear the closing click.

Another goal accomplished by Del Vecchio was to introduce new pen clips reminiscent of a feather, in honor of Pineider’s long-established history of producing writing accessories. The clip design is a Goose Quill in marine steel, which was chosen as Pineider's distinctive trademark. Quills were used for writing with ink before the invention of the dip pen, the metal-nibbed pen, the fountain pen, and, eventually, the ballpoint pen. Quill pens were used to write the vast majority of medieval manuscripts, including the Magna Carta and the Declaration of Independence. Quill pens are still used today by professional scribes and calligraphers.

The filling system in the Mystery Filler is an inbuilt piston mechanism, and contains 7 components of considerable precision. Its operation is unusual. Push the piston knob to release it, then to fill with ink, twist the piston knob as is customary with any piston filler, and when finished filling, push the knob to secure it into original position. A benefit of the hidden piston knob is that it will not interfere with cap posting. Have fun while you observe the internal operation of this writing instrument through the demonstrator window.

Two important questions...how does it write, and what is the value relative to the price we pay? Writing with the Mystery Filler is comfortable--a pleasurable, every-day fountain pen. The nib is extraordinary. What we get for what we pay gives the Mystery Filler its high value.

But wait! There's an unexpected extra. Note in the photo and included free, is the Pineider Pen Filler. It provides a small, reliable, easy-to-use and easy-to-carry, convenient, no-mess method to fill your fountain pen when you are away. An eyedropper is enclosed as well.

Only 888 Limited Edition Mystery Filler fountain pens were created in Black Demonstrator/Rose Gold ("Black Russian"), and 888 in Full Demonstrator ("White Sugar").

Pineider Pens, including the Mystery Filler, are available from the preeminent retailer, penchalet.com

 

post-45142-0-34807400-1555355920_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 3
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • richardandtracy

    1

  • sztainbok

    1

  • Rancho Gordo

    1

  • writepen

    1

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

This is not really a review, in fact it's not very far off advertising copy, so I have moved it to the Italian Forum on the basis the manufacture claims to be in Firenze (Florence).

 

The reason why I don't think it's a review is because, while you state the nib is extraordinary, you don't say what is extraordinary. Is it the flex, softness, smoothness or anything else? Is the nib customised to Peneider's specifications by Bock?

 

I would like to know what the pen feels like in the hand, what diameter, length, weight, balance point etc, how it writes, is it smooth, soft? That sort of thing. Declaratory statements with few reasons or evidence to back them up are what you'd expect in advertising copy, not a review. We allow a lot of latitude in what is in a review, but I fear this does not really meet what we regard as the minimum informative content about the pen itself. The information about the company is useful to a pen historian who may need to know some basics to start researching the company, which is why I have not concluded it is pure advertising copy.

 

Regards,

 

Richard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

I don't think there is much innovation in this pen design.

The Stratford Magnetic fountain pen from the late 1940's had a cap that would close and also post magnetically, just like the Pineider.

Aurora made a beautiful model 98 in the early 1960's had a filler button that retracted and turned to fill, exactly the same way as the Pineider.

The portable ink pot was already a part of the Visconti product line.

Regards,

Victor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the 1980s, I was living in Europe and fell in love with Pineider paper. It's still great.

I was very excited about the pens when I heard about them recently but the photos didn't do anything for me. I saw them in person at the SF Pen Show and was even less impressed. Unless they write really well, I'm not even tempted.

I wish the paper was more readily available, and not just the silly notebooks that say Hollywood.
There's so much potential here and yet...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share








×
×
  • Create New...