Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Visconti Homo Sapiens Full Dissassembly


KingRoach
 Share

Recommended Posts

Dear all,

 

I have a question about fully disassembling a Homo Sapiens pens. I am specifically interested in removing the packing unit of their power filler mechanism. I have not found one that has attempted it yet, and there seems to be no resource for any potential complications online.

 

The pen is made so that the only thing you can take off is the nib unit. Even the blind cap has no notches to help you unthread it, should you need to. They like their pens sealed. Nevertheless, this can be problematic and challenging for us fountain pen folks, and we love a challenge.

 

 

So I have some questions. Notice that my main concern really is with the material as I have not worked with their resins before and don't want to badly affect this pen that I'm working on. Like its glass transition temperature or its reaction to any chemicals.

 

 

Has a full disassembly ever been attempted? This mainly refers to removing the rear packing unit.

If so, what is the best method for removing it.

I suspect the threads in the barrel might be glued. If so, what is the best method for weakening the glue without affecting the barrel resin?

and what does Visconti use to glue it in the first place? (for when I put it back).

 

 

My second question is regarding cleaning staining ink off the inside of a clear barrel. If there is anything you suggest I totally avoid on this resin please let me know now. any ideas welcome.

 

Thank you for passing by. I'm looking forward to hearing any input on this.

 

Best regards

KR

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 11
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • esteroids

    1

  • KingRoach

    7

  • Karmachanic

    1

  • como

    2

Top Posters In This Topic

I have disassembled an old Voyager Demo. It's the same construction. I had no problems but I really don't recommend it unless you take the greatest of care.

 

The packing/guide at the back end does unscrew. I made a tool similar to the vintage Parker tool with matching threads that can be compressed around the filler knob threads.

 

On some models the section and ink window parts are threaded and can be separated. I think the Opera Master is more likely to be constructed this way.

 

In the early days of the celluloid/acrylic demos some had troubles with the different materials separating and ink seepage. I would be leery of applying much heat in the fear that the celluloid and acrylic bond wouldn't like it.

 

Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good luck!

 

Many thanks, esteroids!

 

My thoughts are exactly those. I can actually see the threading of the packing unit in the clear resit of the barrel. I suspect it might also be glued, so I'm hoping for any experience to see if it's too sensitive to heat or not. The other question is of course, when you screw it back in, which glue to use? I have shellac but I think it might not be that, especially for clear resin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, could you tell me anything I need to know for DIYing a a thread grabber? It's not the standard M thread found in common nuts and bolts. I could make one out of a nut if I knew the thread code. I hope I won't have a "manufacture" the tool or buy it right now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I got the feeling that Visconti designed their pens not to be tinkered with. Besides twisting off the nib unit, there isn’t much else to do. That’s why I have only a cartridge converter Visconti pen, though I really like their looks. As they don’t have Montblanc’s after sale service reputation, I fear that I would be an unhappy customer if something goes wrong and I can’t even try to fix it myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My second question is regarding cleaning staining ink off the inside of a clear barrel. If there is anything you suggest I totally avoid on this resin please let me know now. any ideas welcome.

 

 

Cleaner inks should clean the barrel

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/297645-whats-your-cleaner-ink/

Edited by Karmachanic

"Simplicate and add Lightness."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got the feeling that Visconti designed their pens not to be tinkered with. Besides twisting off the nib unit, there isn’t much else to do. That’s why I have only a cartridge converter Visconti pen, though I really like their looks. As they don’t have Montblanc’s after sale service reputation, I fear that I would be an unhappy customer if something goes wrong and I can’t even try to fix it myself.

 

I know, I can see that the pen is not expected to be serviceable. I don't care about that obviously.

A bit of advice, don't buy an expensive pen from Visconti expecting after-care. They only want you to buy more stuff. And I don't think the design is very smart myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I've given it a round of Sovl-X ink for a few days with very little effect. The staining ink in question is MontBlanc Permanent Blue, which seems to have a reputation for being notorious. When I received the pen, I could see the ink had left residue in places which was hard to budge, also behind the plunger, and the barrel is stained bluer than the clear secondary chamber, which doesn't seem to be affected as much.

 

Now I have a better looking pen than when I received it, using non-invasive methods, but behind the plunger (which, for some reason they chose to be white) and nearer the packing unit, I have no access unless I remove the power unit.

 

I have no problem removing it if I wanted to. My question is really only about putting it back in, because, since the barrel is clear, I assume they had a specific adhesive/sealant for it and I would like to be able to use as close to original as possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know this is not what you might want to hear, but I would just leave it alone. You are using the pen, right? When you put ink into it, you will not see the other ink. And that ink will get where you can see it even after it has been cleaned.

 

The (temporary) aesthetic improvement is not worth the risk.

 

Erick

 

Using right now:

Leonardo Officina Italiana Pura "F" nib running Diamine Autumn Oak

Osprey Madison "EF" nib running Leonardo Officina Blue

Kanwrite Heritage "BB" running Jacques Herbin Caroube de Chypre

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know, I can see that the pen is not expected to be serviceable. I don't care about that obviously.

A bit of advice, don't buy an expensive pen from Visconti expecting after-care. They only want you to buy more stuff. And I don't think the design is very smart myself.

I agree. Unfortunately that seems the case. Plunger fillers are nothing new. Onoto De La Rue had it since the 20’s or 30’s and it’s a wonderful filling system, with many still working very well. But not being able to disassemble and service is a deal killer for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know this is not what you might want to hear, but I would just leave it alone. You are using the pen, right? When you put ink into it, you will not see the other ink. And that ink will get where you can see it even after it has been cleaned.

 

The (temporary) aesthetic improvement is not worth the risk.

 

Erick

 

I'm doing it as a favour for someone who cares about it, and I think it's doable. If I can just pin down the original adhesive, it'll be a piece of a cake.

The pen is a Chiantishire with a clear barrel and even I think that the blue residue is an eye sore. I currently have a blueblack Solv-X ink in it, and feel that the aesthetic improvement will be quite noticeable as the blue stain is almost giving me visual itch.

 

Though trying a different "cleaner" ink now seems tempting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      37808
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      30921
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. jar
      jar
      26101
    5. wimg
      wimg
      25595
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • Matthew TWP
      @Ruaidhri This was an absolutely wonderful bit of writing, and I hope that you're able to maintain the style once all of the medications are out of your system.  Take care and recover quickly!
    • Dr.X
      Very punny daniel
    • danielfalgerho
      These comments make me sad as I sympathise with Ruaidhri, having great difficulties in being taken seriously. Or being taken at all (no off-colors jokes, please!) In spite of overwhelming odds,  Ruaidhri -now I know how to spell it- made a courageous decision and stuck to it. I was diagnosed with a similar growth in a place I will not reveal. Oh, well, if you insist it was Mount Sinai Hospital. But I firmly intend to walk in Ruaidhri's footsteps, if he will let me, on my next visit to Dublin.
    • ParramattaPaul
      Reminds me of the day my associates and I developed a cure for all mankind's ills and mistakenly wrote it down with invisible ink.
    • AnneD
      Was that the end of the Laboratory? Somehow the exactitude created a fully destructive device, as always!
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Expiring Soon

    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 11 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 11 months
  • Random Adverts

  • Files

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. Arnie62
      Arnie62
      (59 years old)
    2. baldonia
      baldonia
      (63 years old)
    3. bard694
      bard694
      (59 years old)
    4. callmeavis
      callmeavis
      (47 years old)
    5. carbon27
      carbon27
      (56 years old)





×
×
  • Create New...