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Omas 361 Disassembly & Restoration


jhsd1124013561

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This artcile is to discuss about the disassembly and restoration of a regular line Omas 361, the piston which with a pin, should also work for the old model of Omas Paragon from the 1950s.

 

I got a NOS Omas 361 and a vintage Omas Paragon from the 1950's recently, the piston filling system with a pin really make them special, and I really enjoyed the restoration work.

 

Special thanks to Tom Westerich from http://penboard.de and Richard Binder from http://richardspens.com, enjoy!

 

Pic 1. Green Box of Omas 361

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Pic 2. Open Box of Omas 361 with Papers
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Pic 3. Detail of Omas 361 Papers - Front
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Pic 4. Detail of Omas 361 Papers - Back
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Pic 5. Nib Detail - 1
post-80751-0-26652900-1547946943_thumb.jpg

 

Pic 6. Nib Detail - 2
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Pic 7. Nib Detail - 3
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Pic 8. Nib Detail - 4
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Pic 9. Cap Detail - 1

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Pic 10. Cap Detail - 2
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Pic 11. Cap Detail - 3
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Pic 12. Barrel Detail
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Pic 13. Fully Disassembly
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From left to right:

a. Cap

b. Barrel

c. Piston Cork Unit

d. Blind Cap

e. Pin

f. Feed

g. Nib

h. Hood

 

To disassemble the nib and feed

1. heat the Part H(hood), then pull the Part H(hood) out of Part B(barrel)

2. you will see Part F(feed) and Part G(nib) in Part B(barrel)

3. heat the Part B(barrel) slightly, then carefully pull the Part F(feed) and Part G(nib) out

 

To disassemble the piston

1. pull the Part E(pin) out in picture 14

2. uncrew the Part D(blind cap) out

3. pull the Part C(piston cork unit) out from the Part B(barrel)

 

To restore

1. fully disassemble the pen following the steps above

2. apply scilion to the cork(replace the wooden cork if your pen comes with a wooden one)

3. put the Part C(piston cork unit) into the Part B(barrel) and mark the position of the pin hole (IMPORTANT!)

4. push the Part C(piston cork unit) all the way down of Part B(barrel)

5. screw the Part D(blind cap) on the Part B(barrel), make sure the pin hole on Part D(blind cap) match the position of the pin hole of Part C(piston cork unit)

6. push the Part C(piston cork unit) all the way to the top and make sure the pin hole of Part C(piston cork unit) and Part D(blind cap) are aligned

7. push the Part E(pin) through the pin hole of Part C(piston cork unit) and Part D(blind cap)

8. install the Part F(feed) and Part G(nib) to Part B(barrel)

9. install the Part H(hood)

 

Pic 14. Pin

post-80751-0-76666600-1547946949_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-80751-0-02826000-1547945638_thumb.jpg

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post-80751-0-36319100-1547945699_thumb.jpg

post-80751-0-06709000-1547945939_thumb.jpg

post-80751-0-04440100-1547945987_thumb.jpg

post-80751-0-30371500-1547945994_thumb.jpg

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post-80751-0-71170000-1547946143_thumb.jpg

post-80751-0-76993700-1547946163_thumb.jpg

post-80751-0-18301900-1547946176_thumb.jpg

post-80751-0-31821400-1547946222_thumb.jpg

post-80751-0-44267900-1547946231_thumb.jpg

post-80751-0-40993200-1547946237_thumb.jpg

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post-80751-0-26652900-1547946943_thumb.jpg

post-80751-0-76666600-1547946949_thumb.jpg

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  • 8 months later...
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How fascinating! Thank you for posting this. I just acquired one such 361 out of sheer curiosity. I note that with my pen, the feed does not stick out that fraction of a millimeter over the section on the manifold side. Should this worry me? Does this indicate that it needs disassembly etc.?

 

Many thanks.

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I know that the 361 over the years has developed several models, there might be some variations between the models.

 

If the feed can keep the flow up without an issue, there is not too much to worry. However, if you feels like the ink flow is not proper and would like to have a heavier flow, you can adjust it :)

 

 

How fascinating! Thank you for posting this. I just acquired one such 361 out of sheer curiosity. I note that with my pen, the feed does not stick out that fraction of a millimeter over the section on the manifold side. Should this worry me? Does this indicate that it needs disassembly etc.?

 

Many thanks.

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  • 3 years later...

Thanks very much for this! It was incredibly helpful for me today.

 

Some stuff to add:

 

The section is screwed into the barrel. When tightening, it bottoms out on the top of the barrel on the metal ring. In my case, when I tried to remove the hood, the entire section unscrewed instead.

 

I also had to tighten up the clutch inside the cap, so I've attached a couple of photos of most of the inner parts of the cap. As can be seen in the photos, the plastic cap insert-clutch is screwed in with a reverse thread. This also grabs the clip when it's completely seated. I unscrewed the insert using an M6x1 tap after some soaking to loosen up the dried ink. The tap grabbed the insert pretty quickly and didn't do any serious damage.

 

To tighten up the clutch, I wrapped a couple of layers of thin tape around the end, slicing out the gaps to give some flexibility.

 

omas_361T_cap_01.thumb.JPG.2135afee3018981d95daa5317430d356.JPG

 

omas_361T_cap_02.thumb.JPG.8cd31e10d2b9085a8c8c1b6562f40af7.JPG

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