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Lamy Scala (Glacier Edition)


dapprman
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Here is a brief overview of the pen. There is a link at the end to the full version on my blog. Please note that while the review is on the 50th Anniversary model of the Scala, it also applies to all other models (aside from the nib part for the steel nibbed versions).

 

The Scala is often overlooked. Part of the problem is that Lamy alone have a number of other pens that rival it, all cheaper. This includes the ever popular Studio.

 

Appearance & Design

This is a smart looking pen following the Bauhaus design philosophy. It is deceptively simple in appearance, but at the same time rather smart and classical looking. The chromed components work well with the rest of the body, though at the same time they do prove to be fingerprint magnets. The cap snaps on/off with a satisfying click and can be posted, though this moves the balance point too far to the rear for my liking, however the pen is longer than it first appears, so for many this will not be an issue.

http://i.imgur.com/QRU33vJ.jpg

 

Construction & Quality

The pen is made of steel, with the finial and grip sections being chromed over. My pen has seen a fair bit of abuse over it's time of use and I've not seen any scratches or chips appear. The balance point feels like it is about half way along the barrel, which works very well for me. The one downside for me was the tines of the nib were slightly misaligned. Only noticeable on some strokes in one direction, but still annoying on a pen where the nib is manually tested.

http://i.imgur.com/6l9h2ao.jpg

 

Weight & Dimensions

Being a steel pen, it is not light, but at the same time I do not consider it to be heavy. With the long, gently nib tapered section, and the point of balance I find I can comfortably use this pen for long periods of time.

http://i.imgur.com/bItafqh.jpg

 

Nib & Performance

As mentioned above, the tines were very slightly out of alignment. Easy to fix, but annoying. Once sorted then the pen became very pleasant to use. In typical Lamy gold nib fashion the writing experience is slightly springy, buttery soft, and on the wet side. The fine nib produces a line closer to a western steel medium.

http://i.imgur.com/qlFKba0.jpg

 

Filling System & Maintenance

This is the standard Lamy system. All Scala pens (in the UK at least) come with a converter. This model came with a 50ml bottle of blue ink instead of the ubiquitous cartridge. The Lamy system is reliable, well known, and in the event of a converter failure, cheap.

http://i.imgur.com/SNkdLMk.jpg

 

Cost & Value

This is where it gets interesting. From what I can tell, Scala sales suffer as the pen is about 30% more than the Studio, which it both rivals and pre-dates it. With the latter being popular, this also affects take up. I actually feel the Scala is the superior pen and while more expensive, the extra cost is worth it. When you get to models with gold nibs, the percentage difference is a lot less and I personally think the look and feel of the pen suit the gold nib more and would actually recommend this pen. As to the Glacier version I reviewed. Like all the other Lamy 50th Anniversary edition pens, there was an additional price hike. Fortunately, unlike on the 2k, most shops seemed to discount it back down to the price of the other gold nibbed special editions.

 

Conclusion

This is an often over-looked pen, and from threads else where there is a split in views as to which is the better pen, the Scala or the Studio. I much prefer the former and have considered getting another (probably one of the annual editions), where as I'm not looking to get a second studio despite the appeal of the recent colour choices (a Scala in British Racing Green would appeal me). Certainly this is a pen I'm happy to recommend to others.

 

My full write up can be found at:

https://dapprman.wordpress.com/2019/01/04/lamy-scala-glacier-edition/

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I don't know how lamy pens can be so uniquely designed and yet for all but the CP-1 and 2000, I just find them pedestrian and uninspired.

 

also, polished section. gross.

Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)

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Thanks for this, it's an interesting overview. I like the Studio's design better, but they both might suffer from the chromed section. I am now on my fourth Studio, which I was able to buy new and used from $25 to $40 USD. I find it strange that the 14k nib arrived misaligned, my (steel) Studio nibs have been particularly smoother than my seven Vistas.

"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

 

B. Russell

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I don't know how lamy pens can be so uniquely designed and yet for all but the CP-1 and 2000, I just find them pedestrian and uninspired.

I'm surprised you like the CP1 and maybe don't like the Personna/Imporium. I think it's the catch with following one design philosophy, it's always going to split views and the likes of Bauhaus and Art Deco are probably front runners for that.

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The Glacier color is the only one of the Scalas that appeals to me. Apparently others agreed, because they weren't available for long, and there aren't any for sale on the 'Bay.

Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

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I'm surprised you like the CP1 and maybe don't like the Personna/Imporium. I think it's the catch with following one design philosophy, it's always going to split views and the likes of Bauhaus and Art Deco are probably front runners for that.

 

I dig the persona/imporium's style actually. I like the art deco.

 

But f**k me running with scissors is it overpriced. I could have that $80 nib on my CP1 for a total investment of $110. and that thing usually runs well north of three to five fold that for a freaking cartridge converter.

 

One of my main problems with lamy is their standardized nibs. I generally buy pens for different nibs and writing experiences than specifically different bodies.

Edited by Honeybadgers

Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)

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Here is a brief overview of the pen. There is a link at the end to the full version on my blog. Please note that while the review is on the 50th Anniversary model of the Scala, it also applies to all other models (aside from the nib part for the steel nibbed versions).

 

The Scala is often overlooked. Part of the problem is that Lamy alone have a number of other pens that rival it, all cheaper. This includes the ever popular Studio.

 

Appearance & Design

This is a smart looking pen following the Bauhaus design philosophy. It is deceptively simple in appearance, but at the same time rather smart and classical looking. The chromed components work well with the rest of the body, though at the same time they do prove to be fingerprint magnets. The cap snaps on/off with a satisfying click and can be posted, though this moves the balance point too far to the rear for my liking, however the pen is longer than it first appears, so for many this will not be an issue.

http://i.imgur.com/QRU33vJ.jpg

 

Construction & Quality

The pen is made of steel, with the finial and grip sections being chromed over. My pen has seen a fair bit of abuse over it's time of use and I've not seen any scratches or chips appear. The balance point feels like it is about half way along the barrel, which works very well for me. The one downside for me was the tines of the nib were slightly misaligned. Only noticeable on some strokes in one direction, but still annoying on a pen where the nib is manually tested.

http://i.imgur.com/6l9h2ao.jpg

 

Weight & Dimensions

Being a steel pen, it is not light, but at the same time I do not consider it to be heavy. With the long, gently nib tapered section, and the point of balance I find I can comfortably use this pen for long periods of time.

http://i.imgur.com/bItafqh.jpg

 

Nib & Performance

As mentioned above, the tines were very slightly out of alignment. Easy to fix, but annoying. Once sorted then the pen became very pleasant to use. In typical Lamy gold nib fashion the writing experience is slightly springy, buttery soft, and on the wet side. The fine nib produces a line closer to a western steel medium.

http://i.imgur.com/qlFKba0.jpg

 

Filling System & Maintenance

This is the standard Lamy system. All Scala pens (in the UK at least) come with a converter. This model came with a 50ml bottle of blue ink instead of the ubiquitous cartridge. The Lamy system is reliable, well known, and in the event of a converter failure, cheap.

http://i.imgur.com/SNkdLMk.jpg

 

Cost & Value

This is where it gets interesting. From what I can tell, Scala sales suffer as the pen is about 30% more than the Studio, which it both rivals and pre-dates it. With the latter being popular, this also affects take up. I actually feel the Scala is the superior pen and while more expensive, the extra cost is worth it. When you get to models with gold nibs, the percentage difference is a lot less and I personally think the look and feel of the pen suit the gold nib more and would actually recommend this pen. As to the Glacier version I reviewed. Like all the other Lamy 50th Anniversary edition pens, there was an additional price hike. Fortunately, unlike on the 2k, most shops seemed to discount it back down to the price of the other gold nibbed special editions.

 

Conclusion

This is an often over-looked pen, and from threads else where there is a split in views as to which is the better pen, the Scala or the Studio. I much prefer the former and have considered getting another (probably one of the annual editions), where as I'm not looking to get a second studio despite the appeal of the recent colour choices (a Scala in British Racing Green would appeal me). Certainly this is a pen I'm happy to recommend to others.

 

My full write up can be found at:

https://dapprman.wordpress.com/2019/01/04/lamy-scala-glacier-edition/

Thank you so much for your very complete review.

 

One of the best I have read, you pictures, especially with the ones on you blog give a great assessment of the Scala's place in the Lamy line up.

Is it fair for an intelligent and family oriented mammal to be separated from his/her family and spend his/her life starved in a concrete jail?

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I dig the persona/imporium's style actually. I like the art deco.

 

But f**k me running with scissors is it overpriced. I could have that $80 nib on my CP1 for a total investment of $110. and that thing usually runs well north of three to five fold that for a freaking cartridge converter.

 

Yeah - I was surprised just how expensive it is in the US - no clue how those prices can be justified. It is almost as if they're trying to tell people not to buy the pen.

 

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