Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Scribo Feel


ralfstc

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 155
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • como

    15

  • tubular

    21

  • MoriartyR

    27

  • djm1121

    13

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

My Scribo 'Feel the Flex' arrives today. Going in, I knew the Scribo would not mimic a Vintage Waterman or Mabie Todd. With those two, the mere pressure of the nib to paper turns your fountain pen into a paint brush. What attracted me to the Scribo was it's background with OMAS and its ability with a little pressure to flex and write without railroading at length.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, tubular said:

djm1121, did your Scribo arrive?  How do you like it?

Yes, I picked it up today at the Fedex Terminal. I like it, I like it a lot. Hoping to get some pictures posted tomorrow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, djm1121 said:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/3w2kmtver8pl1yd/20210311_074324.jpg?dl=0

 

I was playing with it last night. I feel I can push it a bit more but right now I am just getting the feel. Sorry, I should have rotated the photo, I'm on my way to work now.

Glad the pen meets your expectations.

 

Aurora black works really well in my Scribos too. Not that I find these nibs to be sensitive to ink choice, and I haven’t found any ink so far that causes problems. If you want to try Scribo’s inks (which I understand to be produced by the same company that made inks for Omas) then the Rosso Melograno is really, really nice to my eye and probably my favourite red.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, MoriartyR said:

If you want to try Scribo’s inks (which I understand to be produced by the same company that made inks for Omas) then the Rosso Melograno is really, really nice to my eye and probably my favourite red.

 

 

I very much like the Verdo bosco that Scribo sent with my pen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, MoriartyR said:

Glad the pen meets your expectations.

 

Aurora black works really well in my Scribos too. Not that I find these nibs to be sensitive to ink choice, and I haven’t found any ink so far that causes problems. If you want to try Scribo’s inks (which I understand to be produced by the same company that made inks for Omas) then the Rosso Melograno is really, really nice to my eye and probably my favourite red.

 

 

How does that Rosso Melograno flow in your nib? Does it flow liberally? It looks like a brilliant red.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, tubular said:

Congratulations, djm1121!

 

Thank you. I am certain once your situation is corrected you'll find that it was worth the wait. My Scribo is flexing more this evening than it did last night. Possibly a break in period, don't know but I can tell the difference like night and day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, djm1121 said:

 

How does that Rosso Melograno flow in your nib? Does it flow liberally? It looks like a brilliant red.

It flows well in my Scribo and is on the viscous side so I feel like it may suit flex nibs, although I never had any railroading with my Scribos so that probably isn’t essential. Scribo nibs and feeds are pretty wet anyway so I don’t think flow is a problem with any ink. I haven’t tried it yet in other pens so I can’t really say anything authoritative.

 

The colour is pure red but slightly darker than medium - I would not say it is bright but it is unmistakeably red. I think it would work well in a professional environment, where a bright fire-engine or strawberry red would be far too bold. I don’t like watery reds or anything with a pink or orange tinge, so this is a nice true red that is saturated but also professional looking.

 

Anyway, inks are very personal preferences but this is one that I particularly like from the Scribo range. So far I’ve only used this, the Verde Mediterraneo (darkish teal) and Grigio Scribo (blueish grey), and the Rosso Melograno is the standout for my taste. I just bought a bottle of Classico Seppia which I’m keen to try soon.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I always liked Omas pens. They were the perfect combination of European engineering and Italian styling. I was very sad when they went out of business. Based, in part, on reading this topic, I ordered a Scribo Foglia with the 14K Extra-Fine nib. Upon arrival, I immediately filled it with ink and I proceeded to write two pages in my journal extolling the virtues of this pen. It has a good size, fits well in my hand, and the nib is as smooth as any extra-fine I own. Having used it only once, a question arose: Is there any advantage to buying the 18K, non-flex, nibs? I thought that the flex nib worked well, and I found it didn't flex with my normal writing pressure. I do know that some nibs only come in 18K, specifically the Stub and BBB. I would appreciate any comments from the experts. I'll post some photos when I get a chance.

"One can not waste time worrying about small minds . . . If we were normal, we'd still be using free ball point pens." —Bo Bo Olson "I already own more ink than a rational person can use in a lifetime." —Waski_the_Squirrel

I'm still trying to figure out how to list all my pens down here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Frank C said:

I always liked Omas pens. They were the perfect combination of European engineering and Italian styling. I was very sad when they went out of business. Based, in part, on reading this topic, I ordered a Scribo Foglia with the 14K Extra-Fine nib. Upon arrival, I immediately filled it with ink and I proceeded to write two pages in my journal extolling the virtues of this pen. It has a good size, fits well in my hand, and the nib is as smooth as any extra-fine I own. Having used it only once, a question arose: Is there any advantage to buying the 18K, non-flex, nibs? I thought that the flex nib worked well, and I found it didn't flex with my normal writing pressure. I do know that some nibs only come in 18K, specifically the Stub and BBB. I would appreciate any comments from the experts. I'll post some photos when I get a chance.

Frank, I also have a couple of Scribos with the 18k fine nibs. They are very good nibs and have an enjoyable feel to write with. My intention was to use these two for regular daily writing - maybe at work. I do agree that the 14k flex nibs can also be used quite well for regular writing if you do not have a heavy hand, and if you’re happy with yours for this purpose then you may have no need for the 18k nib. I suppose the 18k nib is just more rigid and less prone to flexing if you are writing fast or with less care, but, like you, I could certainly live with only the 14k nib.

 

I imagine Scribo sell more of the 14k nibs, for the reason you point out, as well as because they are the main factor that differentiates the brand from the herd of other pen makers. One of the best things about the 14k flex nib is that it is so well balanced to allow significant expression without excessive effort, but only when you intend it.

 

I’m glad you were satisfied with your pen. They aren’t cheap so it’s good that it met your expectations.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree about the 14K nib. I have a light hand, and it does everything I need when I need it to. Mind you, my partner has the 18K fine, and it's a very nice nib too!

 

Ralf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Curious to know if anybody else experienced a 'Break-In Period'? I did, over the span of maybe two days. My 14k EF Scribo seemed to me, to require less pressure to flex than  when I first used it. I would still consider this a everyday writer and I welcomed the change in a positive way. Anybody else experience this?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, MoriartyR said:

Frank, I also have a couple of Scribos with the 18k fine nibs. They are very good nibs and have an enjoyable feel to write with. My intention was to use these two for regular daily writing - maybe at work. I do agree that the 14k flex nibs can also be used quite well for regular writing if you do not have a heavy hand, and if you’re happy with yours for this purpose then you may have no need for the 18k nib. I suppose the 18k nib is just more rigid and less prone to flexing if you are writing fast or with less care, but, like you, I could certainly live with only the 14k nib.

 

I imagine Scribo sell more of the 14k nibs, for the reason you point out, as well as because they are the main factor that differentiates the brand from the herd of other pen makers. One of the best things about the 14k flex nib is that it is so well balanced to allow significant expression without excessive effort, but only when you intend it.

 

I’m glad you were satisfied with your pen. They aren’t cheap so it’s good that it met your expectations.

 

I want to thank everyone for their educated responses. I was reminded that I used a Mont Blanc 146 Fine Nib as my exam pen in school, with Mont Blanc Blue Ink. I chose that pen because the nib was stiff and smooth, and wouldn't be damaged by my pressing too hard if I were a little anxious. My exam days are over and I use a fine- nib Pilot Custom 823 or Custom 74 at work—the nibs are also almost indestructible. My nice pens stay at home. I learned the hard way that Mont Blanc's "precious resin" breaks quite easily when dropped on a hard floor. I am quite enamored with my Scribo Feel. I believe that a few more may be coming my way. 

"One can not waste time worrying about small minds . . . If we were normal, we'd still be using free ball point pens." —Bo Bo Olson "I already own more ink than a rational person can use in a lifetime." —Waski_the_Squirrel

I'm still trying to figure out how to list all my pens down here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I just received a newsletter from Scribo and they have launched a new pen model, the Piuma (“feather”). It is about €100 lower price than the Feel (still not a cheap pen). Unlike the Feel it has a cartridge converter filling system, but it retains the ebonite feed and option of 14k flex and 18k non-flex nibs. It is 144mm long, compared to 148mm for the Feel, so I guess still quite a large pen, but 30g in weight. The website description says it has two facets (hard to see from the photos but I guess they are where the Scribo brand is inscribed, and on the opposite side. The four launch colours are each limited to 219 pieces.
 

They have also added a new nib width for the Piuma - EEF - but it looks like it is only available for the 18k non-flex nib. Doesn’t look like you can order the EEF nib for the Feel yet.

 

I rather like the Piuma. It still seems to have a clean and modern design, is more conservative than the hourglass Feel shape, but is still distinctive and it looks like a Scribo. Personally, I think I like the plain coloured ones best.

 

I wonder if we will see an EEF version of the 14k Flex nib in future. I would quite like that, although the EF nib is already quite fine.

 

7D6AAF5B-BCCB-4481-8CB8-C0FF5B583799

 

0E317B09-4F4A-4455-838D-3D5FBF9C19B5.jpeg
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, como said:

@MoriartyRThanks for posting this. This is nice! I don't mind the c/c system. I like this cool, elegant, modern and minimalistic design.

 

Agreed! Look forward to trying one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice. 

"If you can spend a perfectly useless afternoon in a perfectly useless manner, you have learned how to live."

– Lin Yu-T'ang

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now







×
×
  • Create New...