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Ink Recommendation For Dry Aurora 88


ambofmil
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Hello,

 

 

I have one of the original versions of the black celluloid 88s. It has a fine, firm 14K nib and I've only ever filled it with Aurora Black. However, after using this pairing for quite some time, I'm finding the nib doesn't do the ink justice; it's simply too dry for this firm fine and I think the dryness of the ink accentuates the feedback this pen is known for.

 

But at the same time, I don't think any wet ink is the answer. Maybe something in between Aurora Black and something more lubricating. I'd like the ink to pair well with a firm fine nib, but also not mess with the integrity of the very good vintage condition. The ink window has remained clear using Aurora Black and I'd like to keep it that way. I also don't like anyone but professionals to fiddle with my pens, so I don't want something that's going to gunk up the insides.

 

As for ink performance, I like durable inks that won't wash away if it comes into contact with water.

 

Having said all this, I'd love to hear what other Aurora 88 users recommend for ink pairings.

 

Thanks!

 

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I have Waterman Absolute Brown in mine and am very happy with it. All Waterman inks treat it well in my experience, although you wont get much water resistance...

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Aurora Black is already a pretty wet ink, so I doubt there is much help to be had there. Have you given the pen a really good clean? A well set-up 88 should not have much feedback really, more a feeling of nib on paper. The nibs are pretty soft, even the "firm" ones, so the tines often end up too open or too closed.

After 70 years the pen could probably benefit from a professional once over; I'm sure you'd be thrilled with the results!

In the meantime, there may be a suggestion to fiddle with the spiral piece in the back of the feed. I've never observed any effect from this, though its worth a go if you fancy it!

Cheers

Ralf

Edited by ralfstc
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I have Waterman Absolute Brown in mine and am very happy with it. All Waterman inks treat it well in my experience, although you wont get much water resistance...

 

I love browns so much, yet I don't have a single bottle of proper brown ink. Thanks for the suggestion/nudge!

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Aurora Black is already a pretty wet ink, so I doubt there is much help to be had there. Have you given the pen a really good clean? A well set-up 88 should not have much feedback really, more a feeling of nib on paper. The nibs are pretty soft, even the "firm" ones, so the tines often end up too open or too closed.

 

After 70 years the pen could probably benefit from a professional once over; I'm sure you'd be thrilled with the results!

 

In the meantime, there may be a suggestion to fiddle with the spiral piece in the back of the feed. I've never observed any effect from this, though its worth a go if you fancy it!

 

Cheers

 

Ralf

 

I do have the Aurora Black in a Pelikan with an EF semi-flex, and it's a very happy pairing. I just dislike how the 88 is making the Aurora Black look non-velvety.

 

The pen came to me in near-mint condition; it had been inked before but the seller did clean it. It also got a very thorough soaking and countless flushings before I inked it. It originally came with a flex nib which I had to send back in exchange for the firm fine that's on it now. And while it's not a nail, it is very firm; not even a hint of semi-flex. I actually prefer this pen as a firm because it's a workhorse pen for long bouts of writing... just wish it wrote a bit wetter.

 

Do you have any professional nib-smith/repair-smith recommendations? I'm not comfortable taking this pen apart myself.

 

Thank you!

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The ink window has remained clear using Aurora Black and I'd like to keep it that way.

 

 

Sailor Shikiori doyou then, perhaps? https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/314154-what-inks-are-known-to-clean-your-pen/

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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If it's a firm, chances are you could usefully open up the tines a little. Don't try to take the nib of the feed and bend it-- those nibs are very thin, and easily mis-shapen. Photographic film may be a good answer, used with care!

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I had the same issue which I fixed opening a little bit the tines with a photographic film.

 

 

 

If it's a firm, chances are you could usefully open up the tines a little. Don't try to take the nib of the feed and bend it-- those nibs are very thin, and easily mis-shapen. Photographic film may be a good answer, used with care!

 

 

Thanks to you both for this suggestion. I do have a piece of brass shim, which is used periodically for basic flossing but I used it to spread the tines by gently using a twisting motion. I think it did the trick because it's writing a tad wetter now. Thank you!

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Excellent thread; so cool to see the stain disappear.

 

I think I'll get the Sailor ink for its cleaning properties. There is a tiny line of old ink that flushing doesn't reach, and I like the sound of this ink cleans ink method. Thank you!

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