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Old Mystery Sheaffers


A-Steroid-Induced-Bear
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I'm still new to fountain pens, and it started with two old Sheaffers from my grandmother. However, I don't know what they are. While I'm pretty sure the teal italic is a No Nonsense, I have not the slightest clue about the red one. Anyone know for sure?post-146536-0-31480000-1543897968_thumb.jpgpost-146536-0-22043500-1543897988_thumb.jpgpost-146536-0-62327700-1543898094_thumb.jpg

Side note: is this an ebonite feed? It's got tiny lines from machining, and it has a matte "finish." The lines are hard to see in the photo. They're probably about as wide as a playing card is thick.

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The red pen is a Sheaffer school pen from the mid 1960s. This pen model has no name, Sheaffer advertisements sometimes refer to this model as "cartridge pen".

 

The feed is not ebonite but plastic.

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The blue pen is a Sheaffer No Nonsense. Often sold as a set with various size nibs. A version is still made called a "viewpoint" or something like that. No Nonsense are very good writers and can easily be turned into an eyedropper filler with a bit of silicone grease on the nib section threads.

Do remember that the items on your bucket list have an expiration date.
 

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Thanks for the info!

 

Unfortunately, the No Nonsense has a crack in the body. (Long story short, its discovery involved a syringe full of Noodler's Heart of Darkness. Big mistake.) As for the school pen, I'm amazed it might be that old. Still writes like a little champ.

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Oh dear, a pen from the 1960s described as ''that old'' - sigh! I'm from the late 40s what does that make me? :yikes: :yikes: :yikes:

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Oh dear, a pen from the 1960s described as ''that old'' - sigh! I'm from the late 40s what does that make me? :yikes: :yikes: :yikes:

To be fair, most of my pens were manufactured after 2013, so a 60s pen is only "that old" by comparison. Late 40s is just highly experienced. ;)

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Oh dear, a pen from the 1960s described as ''that old'' - sigh! I'm from the late 40s what does that make me? :yikes: :yikes: :yikes:

 

Me too, from the late 40s. I have a few of those old school pens. They are very good pens. I think enough of them that I bought a couple of the red tipped squeeze converters with PVC sacs for them. I feankly like them better than Pelikan M series pens, if that gives an idea of their quality. Back in the 60s they made better pens commonly.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

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Oh dear, a pen from the 1960s described as ''that old'' - sigh! I'm from the late 40s what does that make me? :yikes: :yikes: :yikes:

 

Yeah, and my oldest pen is a 1926 Duofold Lucky Curve, which means it got made when my father was THREE!

I grew UP in the 1960s and 70s....

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

ETA: There's nothing quite as depressing as being in an antiques mall and seeing the album your favorite song is on proudly on display.... :headsmack: (I've owned my copy of the recording since about 1972...). That makes the album nearly half a century old.... :gaah:

Almost as bad was being in another one and seeing a cardboard store display unit that was for some Bruce Springsteen album.... And I don't mean Born to Run -- I mean one of the LATER albums....

Edited by inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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Yeah, and my oldest pen is a 1926 Duofold Lucky Curve, which means it got made when my father was THREE!

I grew UP in the 1960s and 70s....

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

ETA: There's nothing quite as depressing as being in an antiques mall and seeing the album your favorite song is on proudly on display.... :headsmack: (I've owned my copy of the recording since about 1972...). That makes the album nearly half a century old.... :gaah:

Almost as bad was being in another one and seeing a cardboard store display unit that was for some Bruce Springsteen album.... And I don't mean Born to Run -- I mean one of the LATER albums....

 

I know the feeling. My wife and I enjoy visiting antique malls but are frequently chagrined to find items for sale that we still use.

 

The Sheaffer school pen is still one of my favorites - I used one when I was in school in the 70's just to be different (I also used a slide rule when hand calculators were just finding their way into the classroom - got extra credit in Physics class!).

 

As OCArt mentioned, they are easily converted to eyedropper use. I sometimes use them for drawing and sketching (fine nib).

 

-Mike

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I began life in the late thirties so most of my vintage pens are younger than I am; and I still have my slide rule. :D

Edited by corgicoupe

Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

Robert Frost

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I began life in the late thirties so most of my vintage pens are younger than I am; and I still have my slide rule. :D

Only one slide rule? I've lost count of how many I own -- and I only bought my first one around 1970 (whereupon I seem to have terrorized my 8th grade teacher). Let's see: two Faber-Castell, two Sterling Plastics (if I can locate the 6" pocket rule), three Picketts (even took one to my General/Extra license tests a decade ago, since my calculators were not on the approved list), have a pair of circular rules...

 

Oh, and the one on my wrist (Citizen Eco-Drive Skyhawk AT -- the only watch I know of that had to have a firmware update because it mishandled leap-year one year, and since it syncs to WWV-B every night, manually setting the correct date wouldn't work; it would sync and recompute the wrong date)

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