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Pen Show, Tell, Display: Platinum



stan

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Some recent additions.

Mostly focus on earlier 3776 models with ebonite feeds and JIS marked nibs.

 

1. Plain model but, with private logo on top of cap. Don't see too many like that.

2. Aizu makie. Yes. It is all appears to be done by hand. No screening unless Platinum uses multiple different screens for the same designs - have seen the same design on same era model but not the same.

3. I'm told Aizu makie. Not gold leaf. Signed Shinonome in gold over the gold.

 

 

 

 

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stan

Formerly Ryojusen Pens
The oldest and largest buyer and seller of vintage Japanese pens in America.


Member: Pen Collectors of America & Fuente, THE Japanese Pen Collectors Club

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Paul-in-SF

Here are three further oldish to old Platinums. The red "first edition" 3776, an early 1950s steel nib eye-dropper and a strange and fascinating pre-war pen.

I recently acquired the eye-dropper from UK and have not had time to fix the bottom leak, so writing matters remain open, but as an object it is attractive. The "strange" one has Platinum logos on body and clip, but the clip is - as far as the seller or I know - unique. The nib is without brand name, but just fabulous. This is the smoothest of all my pens. Writing with it makes me feel good - a magical pen it is indeed. Most attractive as well.

fpn_1539004554__plat6.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

A year and a half later, and I have a question or two about the red pen (questions for anyone, not specifically philhygra). I have one that looks like that, except in black, and with a gold nib, that I bought probably in the early 90's. I understood that this ribbed design was called "gathered" and I'm wondering if that is correct, or what the correct description/designation would be.

 

Also, my pen has a snap cap, but the snap is really anemic, and the F or EF nib tends to dry out pretty quickly. Is that normal for this style of pen? I bought the pen new and it has always been like that. There is a kind of inner cap but nothing like they have these days.

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A Smug Dill

I understood that this ribbed design was called "gathered" and I'm wondering if that is correct,

Affirmative. https://www.platinum-pen.co.jp/en/products/detail/?pid=6024

 

or what the correct description/designation would be.

PTB-20000G#1 (and, if I remember correctly, the 'suffix' of #10 would designate the wine red version).

 

Also, my pen has a snap cap, but the snap is really anemic, and the F or EF nib tends to dry out pretty quickly. Is that normal for this style of pen?

Sadly, I've never found the snap caps on Platinum fountain pens >$30 — even those in the #3776 product family — to be very effective at preventing ink from evaporating when capped and undisturbed. That's my experience from Platinum Balance, #3776 Celluloid and #3776 Briar models. The Platinum Vicoh (including but not limited to the PTL-5000A) is marginally better, but still no match for, say, the snap caps on the Rotring 400, LAMY cp1 or Aurora Ipsilon fountain pens.

 

There is a kind of inner cap but nothing like they have these days.

Looking at Platinum's catalogue (https://www.platinum-pen.co.jp/cms/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Platinum-pen-general-catalog-2019-2020.pdf), the only models that have the Slip-and-Seal mechanism in their snap caps are ironically the cheapest ones: Preppy, Plaisir and Procyon (the last of which is >$30, but I've never bought or used because I think they're overpriced). The Prefounte, too, which isn't listed in the catalogue.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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Paul-in-SF

Thanks, very complete and useful. For some reason it's comforting to me to know that they're all like that and I didn't just get a bad one.

 

Since I had it out for these questions, I dipped it to remind myself what it is like to write with, and it really is a pleasure to use. I will probably ink it up again and give it another chance (hoping against hope) to not run dry between uses -- considering how many pens I have inked, that's probably close to a 2-week interval, which would be a challenge to a lot of pens, I think.

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A Smug Dill

... give it another chance (hoping against hope) to not run dry between uses -- considering how many pens I have inked, that's probably close to a 2-week interval, which would be a challenge to a lot of pens, I think.

 

 

Oh, the snap caps on Platinum #3776 pens can prevent a full converter of ink from drying out in six or maybe even eight weeks, even though the ink will thicken (and, depending on the colour, become visibly much darker) over that time, in my experience.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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Regardless of make and model one should not let ink sit in a pen unused for six to eight weeks. If not using the pen, flush it out with water. Regardless my regardless, one should wash their pens out with water regularly anyway.

stan

Formerly Ryojusen Pens
The oldest and largest buyer and seller of vintage Japanese pens in America.


Member: Pen Collectors of America & Fuente, THE Japanese Pen Collectors Club

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A Smug Dill

I like my pens ready to write with over a hundred different inks at a moment's notice, and that's why initially I favoured Platinum most of all out of the Japanese 'Big Three' brands. I have ten Plaisir pens dedicated to ten different Pilot Iroshizuku colours (and an eleventh one for Platinum Carbon Black), numerous Preppy pens (some 'eyedroppered', some not) for Sailor STORiA pigment inks and Noodler's bulletproof inks, as well as an Izumo (always inked with Pilot Iroshizuku yama-budo, and that pen has never let ink dry out through evaporation while capped) and ten or so #3776 models of various descriptions. The last thing I'd want to do is dump more than half a converter's fill of ink at a time down the drain in the name of good pen hygiene; nor do I want to have to prep and fill my pens with the inks I want to use (at a whim on the day) before each instance of scribbling a couple of lines or pages for fun.

 

I can live with flushing each pen once every six months or so, even if it means wasting whatever ink still remains in the converter or barrel, but not on the basis of how much or little use it has seen or will foreseeably get.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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Gold trim rings have a very thin layer of gold colored metal over the base metal. The gold does not fully encase the edges of the base metal. And, that creates a problem for some pens. Water or acids from ink can attack the base metal causing delamination. All it needs is a microscopic opening.

 

Waterman, for example, suggests pens should be rinsed after each converter or cartridge is used. They will not put this in their literature but will let you know when you return the nib section as defective. Daniel Kirchheimer who specializes in plating repairs goes as far to suggest avoiding pens with plated trim rings.

https://danielkirchheimer.com/category/blog/fountain-pens/pen-repair-restoration-blog/

 

So, what to do? If it is an inexpensive pen don't worry about it. If it is a rather expensive collectors item, maybe one should not be using it much anyway. And, it should not be too big of a deal to flush the pen with water periodically. By flushing thoroughly cleaning the section is meant. It may remove any build-up in the feed as well.

 

I use about five pens at a time and two have gold trim rings. I am not good at cleaning them and get around to doing so about once every two or three months. Seems to work for me.

stan

Formerly Ryojusen Pens
The oldest and largest buyer and seller of vintage Japanese pens in America.


Member: Pen Collectors of America & Fuente, THE Japanese Pen Collectors Club

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Here's a selection of modern Platinum pens from my pen chest. These represent nearly the full range of pens offered. I would like to get an Izumo one day soon to add to the collection...

 

Vq34zJZ.jpg

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  • 9 months later...
On 10/1/2018 at 8:57 AM, stan said:

Some have been posted before in discussion of Platinum pens. Just new pics with some not previously included. Platinum used a good number of designs for their decorate pens. Hardly any are seen today. Sorry, no pics of the silver.

 

The older 1980s and 1990s models are getting difficult to find. Increased interest.

 

fpn_1538398174__dsc01182.jpg

 

fpn_1538398197__dsc01184.jpg

 

Wow, amazing collection! Do you have any info on the red pen with mountains (seventh from right) and/or the blue pen with clouds (third one from right)?

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The pen between the one with the flower and the tortoiseshell is called sansuiSansui has become a somewhat generic term applied to pine tree decorations. The model displayed is shown in my 1980-1990s catalogue as a modern style (kindai-makie) model. It disappeared from Japanese Platinum catalogues sometime before 2000 and reappears on the Platinum American website in 2004. Might be left over stock. 

 

Pen is supposedly screened but, interestingly, every model I have seen is slightly different. Different screens is somewhat doubtful. The design is tactile meaning it is raised and can easily be felt to the touch.

 

This was part of a basic line of pens that sported gold-colored nibs. Platinum made over thirty and counting makie models so this was an effort to reach out to those who wanted a decorative pen without the need for a fat wallet. Being introductory pens they write pretty good. Maybe an effort to seduce users into purchasing more expensive models.

 

Older Platinum makie models have become difficult to source. They are collectable with the makie series remaining affordable to most.

 

 

stan

Formerly Ryojusen Pens
The oldest and largest buyer and seller of vintage Japanese pens in America.


Member: Pen Collectors of America & Fuente, THE Japanese Pen Collectors Club

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