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Another Review Of Sailor Souboku Pigment Ink


A Smug Dill
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That is definitely a pen worth having back. That was kind of you to load that out. I don't think I'd have the courage to lend that out.

I wouldn't knowingly damage anyone else's pen, in fact I'd take EXTRA care of it.

 

With this in mind, I presumed the recepient would feel the same way. The pen had a lovely week and managed to write many words. A little break from my desk so to speak.

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I wouldn't knowingly damage anyone else's pen, in fact I'd take EXTRA care of it.

 

With this in mind, I presumed the recepient would feel the same way. The pen had a lovely week and managed to write many words. A little break from my desk so to speak.

 

I wouldn't imagine that. You must be around some good folk who know what they're doing.

 

Not novices of course. I'll never let a novice or inexperienced person touch my fountain pen again. I've had some experiences that made my heart skip a beat and quickly learned lolol

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Not novices of course. I'll never let a novice or inexperienced person touch my fountain pen again.

Last werek, I leant my Pilot Capless to our local vicar during a meeting I was at. He needed a pen. He began to hold it almost at right angles to the paper and my hand hovered, milliseconds away from snatching it back. :o

 

All was good. No harm done. Phew :) We love our pens so much.

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Last werek, I leant my Pilot Capless to our local vicar during a meeting I was at. He needed a pen. He began to hold it almost at right angles to the paper and my hand hovered, milliseconds away from snatching it back. :o

 

All was good. No harm done. Phew :) We love our pens so much.

 

lol :o You know exactly what I'm talking about. Nearly every heart skipping lending experience I've had occurs with someone pressing that nib at a right angle.

 

A descent fountain pen gives back as much as we put it :wub: .

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  • 1 year later...

*bump*

 

Dill, apart from the colour difference, how do Kiwaguro and Souboku compare? I use Kiwaguro all the time and particularly adore its tendency to reduce the apparent line width of a pen. I’d love to find another ink that closely resembles Kiwaguro in every aspect except colour.

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I didn't think I'd like the color of Seiboku, but Souboku is right up my alley. And I like the ink very much (my experience with Kiwaguro is a different kettle of fish entirely, but that was in a Preppy set up as a rollerball).

Thanks for the review (I know I'm a bit more than just fashionably late to the party, but still... :rolleyes:).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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Dill, apart from the colour difference, how do Kiwaguro and Souboku compare?

The one thing I always note is that Sailor kiwaguro is not nearly waterproof; colour will bleed off the paper surface upon contact with water. Sailor souboku (and seiboku, too) is almost completely waterproof, at least when writing on Rhodia 80 g/m² notepad paper. As a result, I don't use Sailor kiwaguro these days as often as I thought I would, but use Platinum Carbon Black in its stead, although the latter is more apt to feather and/or bleed-through on some papers the former. I haven't otherwise tested kiwaguro against souboku using the same pen and nib writing on the same piece of paper, to compare line widths and/or "wetness" of the two inks.

 

As noted in my ink review, souboku has a noticeable tendency to hold together in droplets inside the converter, whereas I haven't observed the same with kiwaguro.

 

I’d love to find another ink that closely resembles Kiwaguro in every aspect except colour.

I'm afraid I can't help you there.

 

Luckily, there are only so many pigment inks on the market, and testing them all takes only finite time and effort in your quest. :)

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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The one thing I always note is that Sailor kiwaguro is not nearly waterproof; colour will bleed off the paper surface upon contact with water. Sailor souboku (and seiboku, too) is almost completely waterproof, at least when writing on Rhodia 80 g/m² notepad paper. As a result, I don't use Sailor kiwaguro these days as often as I thought I would, but use Platinum Carbon Black in its stead, although the latter is more apt to feather and/or bleed-through on some papers the former. I haven't otherwise tested kiwaguro against souboku using the same pen and nib writing on the same piece of paper, to compare line widths and/or "wetness" of the two inks.

 

As noted in my ink review, souboku has a noticeable tendency to hold together in droplets inside the converter, whereas I haven't observed the same with kiwaguro.

 

I'm afraid I can't help you there.

 

Luckily, there are only so many pigment inks on the market, and testing them all takes only finite time and effort in your quest. :)

 

 

I believe that Sailor Kiwa-Guru is a Nano particle pigment ink and is water resistant and sometimes described as a permanent ink. Some sites and reviews describe it as water resistant others call in permanent or waterproof.

 

Jet Pens: This bottle of high quality Ultra Black Nano Ink, also known as Kiwa-Guro, contains 50 ml of water resistant ink.

 

The Writing Desk:

  • Permanent and waterproof ink for fountain pens

Mountain of Ink: Water resistance: High-the ink did not budge.

Gourmet pens:

  • Quite water resistant.

Ed Jelley: It’s probably the best ink I’ve used period. Kiwa Guro is filled with tiny “nano particles” (a.k.a. pigment) that puts down a smooth, permanent, archivally safe line

Edited by Bill P
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I believe that Sailor Kiwa-Guru is a Nano particle pigment ink and is water resistant and sometimes described as a permanent ink.

 

Sailor kiwaguro, seiboku and souboku are all in the same line of inks. I have old bottles of the first two, bought years ago before the change in Sailor's marketing some fifteen(?) months ago, and the labelling states "Nano ink" (ナノインク); but the "Nano" part has been dropped from the labelling on the new bottles (of all three inks), which now just states "pigment ink" (顔料インク).

 

The old retail boxes for kiwaguro and seiboku state that the inks have "excellent water resistance"; and they are, in that writing done in them will remain on the page even after soaking the piece of paper for hours in plain water. However, as the photographs there show, some black dye will wash off the marks left by kiwaguro, with the potential to then stain the surrounding area; thus it is not waterproof, irrespective of whether the ink marks' permanence satisfy criteria decided upon by Technical Committee ISO/TC 46, Information and documentation, Subcommittee SC 10, Physical keeping of documents, for being for "documentary use".

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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Out of curiosity I sent an email to Salior....I noted to them that the labeling had changed (dropping the nano) on their 3 nano pigment inks, and the "excellent water resistance" had also been dropped from the labeling, and was wondering if the formula had changed or the water resistance/permanence had changed .

 

The Sailor reply received on 2/10/2020 from the Sailor Pen Overseas Division:

 

Dear Sir,

Thank you for your inquiry.
We have not changed the formulation of Kiwa Guro although the package was redesigned.
Best regards,
Shin Fujisawa
The Sailor Pen Co., Ltd.
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The one thing I always note is that Sailor kiwaguro is not nearly waterproof; colour will bleed off the paper surface upon contact with water. Sailor souboku (and seiboku, too) is almost completely waterproof, at least when writing on Rhodia 80 g/m² notepad paper. As a result, I don't use Sailor kiwaguro these days as often as I thought I would, but use Platinum Carbon Black in its stead, although the latter is more apt to feather and/or bleed-through on some papers the former. I haven't otherwise tested kiwaguro against souboku using the same pen and nib writing on the same piece of paper, to compare line widths and/or "wetness" of the two inks.

 

As noted in my ink review, souboku has a noticeable tendency to hold together in droplets inside the converter, whereas I haven't observed the same with kiwaguro.

 

I'm afraid I can't help you there. Luckily, there are only so many pigment inks on the market, and testing them all takes only finite time and effort in your quest. :)

 

 

Thank you & sorry for late response.

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