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Visconti Van Gogh


MHR
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Good Day

 

I have a newbie question...

 

Can anyone tell me, Can the steal nib be removed (by me) to fully clear and clean the feed channel?

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You should be able to unscrew the nib unit but that really would not help clean the feed channel. I expect you can pull the nib and feed out of the housing with it still in the section, but why do you need to clean this way? Have you tried a bulb syringe, or soaking in pen wash?

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Yes, you can easily pull the steel nib and feeder for your Van Gogh out of the "nib unit" (i.e., the steel tube that screws onto the pen body). It doesn't matter if the nib unit is attached to the pen or not when you remove the nib and feeder. The nib and feeder are held by friction in the tube of the nib.

 

To remove the nib and feeder, just grip them both between your fingers and gently twist until the nib and feeder come loose. Then you can clean the nib, feeder and nib unit to your heart's content. Driften is 100% right that soaking the feeder (overnight) in a good pen/ink wash is the best method, especially when the feeder is clogged with dried ink or if you want to change your ink color. You can also soak the feeder overnight or longer in purified water (distilled or deionized water) -- purified water is a good solvent. In a pinch, you can also soak the feeder in warm water with a little Dawn dish soap -- just ensure that you rinse your feeder well under running water and then soak in water (purified or tap) to get rid of any soap residue.

 

When you go to reinstall the nib and feeder back into nib unit, be sure you line up the nib properly on the feeder -- there's a very slight ridge on the feeder which the bottom of the nib butts into. Once you have the nib lined up, insert the nib/feeder assembly back into the nib unit and twist gently to lock it in place.

Edited by Stylo_dOr
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What are you guys feeding your poor pens that they need all this constant disassembling? I’ve got pens that have gone half a century without needing disassembly.

 

A good rinse should be plenty if you’re using your pen regularly with a decent ink. (I do NOT include anything sparkly or twinkling under decent)

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What are you guys feeding your poor pens that they need all this constant disassembling? I’ve got pens that have gone half a century without needing disassembly.

 

A good rinse should be plenty if you’re using your pen regularly with a decent ink. (I do NOT include anything sparkly or twinkling under decent)

 

Ha! You're obviously not OCD. Lol

 

I remember when I bought my first Van Gogh years ago -- back then, it was such an extravagant purchase for me. I didn't know much about inks either: I was fixated on Noodler's "Warden" ink. Twice I let that ink sit too long in the pen -- it dried and clogged the feeder/nib. I couldn't get the pen to write again. I did everything -- pen wash, rinse, etc -- but I couldn't get that damn ink out of the pen. I was bummed; I wished I'd never bought that Van Gogh. Then, I discovered that I could dismantle the nib and feeder from the nib unit. I was stoked; my Van Gogh worked again.

 

The OP is obviously new to pens. I remember how that feels -- it's empowering to be able to dismantle one's pen when one inadvertently screws up, as one inevitably does. The good news is that the OP can dismantle their Van Gogh to their heart's content without risking damage -- the nib's friction fit is designed to dismantle the nib and feeder if necessary.

Edited by Stylo_dOr
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What are you guys feeding your poor pens that they need all this constant disassembling? I’ve got pens that have gone half a century without needing disassembly.

 

A good rinse should be plenty if you’re using your pen regularly with a decent ink. (I do NOT include anything sparkly or twinkling under decent)

 

I'm an engineer by training and by heart.. the moment something gets into my hands.. I have to break it apart.. oh.. and I like those shimmery, sheening inks too.

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