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Twsbi Eco Eco Ef Nib



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TheDoctor_10

Hello. I recently acquired a twsbi eco in ef, and so I was doing a little after-research about the pen and I found some sites or reviews saying that the nib could offer some line variation ( sbrebrown's serious nibbage episode on the eco), while others (like the eco's review on scribblejot by thomas xavier) saying that it was a "steel nail". I don't want to spring the tines on my eco by overpressing the nib to try and achieve a little line variation, so could someone please tell me whether the nib will offer line variation at a decent pressure? Thanks!

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I have two EF Ecos. I would not recommend trying to get any line variation from them. They're very stiff. And while the steel may give a little line variation, the grip section is also prone to cracking, and the added pressure from pushing down hard on the nib would probably increase the risk of cracking.

 

IMO, if you want to get some line variation, go for a softer nib, a stub, or a section that's less likely to crack.

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TheDoctor_10

I have two EF Ecos. I would not recommend trying to get any line variation from them. They're very stiff. And while the steel may give a little line variation, the grip section is also prone to cracking, and the added pressure from pushing down hard on the nib would probably increase the risk of cracking.

 

IMO, if you want to get some line variation, go for a softer nib, a stub, or a section that's less likely to crack.

Thank you for the clarification!

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Have mercy on the Twsbi EF :)

 

Line variations can be had through many ways. Flexing a nib is only 1 of the many ways.

 

Please explore the different angles of a nib. Lightening the touch with a broader nib, tilting the pen, pen rotation all bring about variations in line width.

 

The EF nib on most pens are meant to be a fine line. Although line variations can be had by exploring different areas of the nib, the amount of variation is at best, subtle.

 

Please also try stub nibs for quick and easy ways to get line variations.

 

Also take a look at softer nibs - or flex nibs if you really like applying pressure to nibs. :)

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Honeybadgers

TWSBI nibs are way, way too hard to try to flex.

Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)

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Reversed, the nib will give a line comparable to a Pilot xf. Used properly, you’ll get a regular western xf, tho you can get finer if you have a light hand. That’s about the range of comfortable line variation in my book. Yes you can get a somewhat heavier line with more pressure, and you might notice some heavier bits when you write and draw. But you really don’t want to try flexing the nib. It’s not meant for it.

 

It’s got a fair bit of variety of line for an xf, and it shows it well. But usually when people ask about this, they want an experience closer to a dip nib. In that case, buy a holder and some cheap steel nibs. Your hand and wallet will both thank you.

 

I wouldn’t recommend an italic nib on a fountain pen if what you’re after is line variation. It requires a certain degree of technical skill to use effectively. If you’re prone to rotating your pen without noticing, or you have a lot of trouble staying in a fountain pen’s sweet spot, the italic won’t do what you want. And even used properly, it won’t be easy to get as fine as the xf nib, if that’s the primary line you want. If you want to try italic, I’d suggest a felt tip pen or a wide lead mechanical pencil (1.9mm mechanical carpenter’s pencils). Wait to spring for Speedball C nibs or a fountain pen italic until you are comfortable with the cheaper tool. See, it’s easier to learn the fine motor control you need for an italic nib with a big nib, because it helps you see your mistakes. And mostly fountain pens (especially the nicer ones) only offer very narrow italic nibs. And the felt tip or pencil will be less likely to shred your paper if you hold it wrong.

 

(I have and love quite a few italic nibs, but the learning curve for them can be very steep if you aren’t used to the quirks. And particularly if you’re trying to write “calligraphy” you probably want to write a hand that isn’t necessarily suitable for the nib.)

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