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Moving My Collection Of Ink



yawningreyhound

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yawningreyhound

Hi everyone! I searched a little and couldn't find a good answer, so please forgive if this has been covered.

 

I'm moving my 200-bottle collection of inks. My choices are:

 

In the POD, which will be overland from Colorado to the coast, then on a boat for 7 days.

I worry about this method being too hot.

 

In a Priority Flat Rate Box (several of them, I'm sure), shipped USPS.

Again, I worry about the heat, but it will be a shorter exposure than the shipping in the POD.

 

In my checked luggage

This seems like a huge pain in the patootie and extremely heavy, but maybe the least exposure to prolonged heat. They put animals in the hold, so it can't be TOO hot.

 

Any input would be greatly appreciated!

 

 

 

 

 

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amberleadavis

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).



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No matter what method of shipping you use, Amberlea's link has good advice, particularly about the importance of getting good seals on whatever you transport each ink in.

 

As for the shipping methods...

 

The real risk of transporting your ink by air is that it will be far more likely to freeze during a long flight than for heat to be a problem.

A plane's cargo hold usually isn't hot unless the plane is on the ground in a hot place. In flight, temps can be 9.8 degrees Celsius (50 Fahrenheit) cooler than the ground temp per 1000 meters of altitude, because the higher the altitude, the higher the temp. This is why the tops of mountains are so much cooler than the base. Most long distance flights fly at around 4000 meters. That means the air temp up there could be 100 degrees cooler than on the ground.

 

Note: There is some heat effect in a baggage hold from being enclosed if it's been in a hot place (most places in the continental US during summer). How low the temp gets can also be affected by any heat buildup that seeps into the hold from the plane's operational systems and the bodies above the hold (usually not as much as you think), what kind of insulation the cargo hold has (usually not much at all) and if it's climate-controlled (HAHAHAHAHAHA! Yeah, right--as if airlines these days will waste money on that!).

 

I can vouch for how cold it can get in a plane because my ex-husband was part of a USAF flight crew. Even in the summer, he wore those thick jumpsuits with usually long johns underneath, because the USAF planes skimped on the insulation and the climate control. I took a few demo flights in some of the planes back when I was also in the service, and every time they told us to bring at least a sweater, because it might get cold enough to need it once we reached altitude. And it almost always did get that cold, especially in the flights I caught in the northern tier states.

 

Because it can get so cold in a plane's cargo hold--which any shipping firm will use for international shipments, boat transit might actually be your best option. Your ink will be stored in the cargo holds, which are in or closest to the water. This will keep them at or close to the water's temperature, which is cool, but not freezing. My experience has also been that boat shipping companies handle their cargo with better care than the airlines, which is a definite consideration. Yeah, it takes longer to ship by water, but pack sample vials of your favorite/must have inks in your carry-on, and that should tide you over until the bottled inks are back in your possession.

 

Also, if you bring any ink in a carry-on, don't overfill the bottles or sample vials. The pressurization can make for a mess, even if you seal them well. Leave at least a finger-width of air at the top (most bottled inks are already at this level), and then seal it well with plastic wrap over the bottle then screwing on the top. Or tape it well, or whatever. Then put the ink in a Ziploc bag.

 

Unless you want ink exploding all over the innards of your luggage...

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Aquarias advice is very good.

 

What you said, yawningreyhound, about pets in cargo holds is true of a *very limited* number of flights. For pets to be shipped by air cargo, the temperatures at the departure and arrival locations must be between a specific range, the airports must have veterinary holding facilities, and more. So only flights that meet stringent guidelines, and only on certain airlines, may have OK temps for the ink, but it is more likely that the temps will be extreme.

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yawningreyhound

Aquarias advice is very good.

 

What you said, yawningreyhound, about pets in cargo holds is true of a *very limited* number of flights. For pets to be shipped by air cargo, the temperatures at the departure and arrival locations must be between a specific range, the airports must have veterinary holding facilities, and more. So only flights that meet stringent guidelines, and only on certain airlines, may have OK temps for the ink, but it is more likely that the temps will be extreme.

Thank you! I'm thinking I'm going with POD packing. With careful packaging.

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yawningreyhound

No matter what method of shipping you use, Amberlea's link has good advice, particularly about the importance of getting good seals on whatever you transport each ink in.

 

As for the shipping methods...

 

The real risk of transporting your ink by air is that it will be far more likely to freeze during a long flight than for heat to be a problem.

A plane's cargo hold usually isn't hot unless the plane is on the ground in a hot place. In flight, temps can be 9.8 degrees Celsius (50 Fahrenheit) cooler than the ground temp per 1000 meters of altitude, because the higher the altitude, the higher the temp. This is why the tops of mountains are so much cooler than the base. Most long distance flights fly at around 4000 meters. That means the air temp up there could be 100 degrees cooler than on the ground.

 

Note: There is some heat effect in a baggage hold from being enclosed if it's been in a hot place (most places in the continental US during summer). How low the temp gets can also be affected by any heat buildup that seeps into the hold from the plane's operational systems and the bodies above the hold (usually not as much as you think), what kind of insulation the cargo hold has (usually not much at all) and if it's climate-controlled (HAHAHAHAHAHA! Yeah, right--as if airlines these days will waste money on that!).

 

I can vouch for how cold it can get in a plane because my ex-husband was part of a USAF flight crew. Even in the summer, he wore those thick jumpsuits with usually long johns underneath, because the USAF planes skimped on the insulation and the climate control. I took a few demo flights in some of the planes back when I was also in the service, and every time they told us to bring at least a sweater, because it might get cold enough to need it once we reached altitude. And it almost always did get that cold, especially in the flights I caught in the northern tier states.

 

Because it can get so cold in a plane's cargo hold--which any shipping firm will use for international shipments, boat transit might actually be your best option. Your ink will be stored in the cargo holds, which are in or closest to the water. This will keep them at or close to the water's temperature, which is cool, but not freezing. My experience has also been that boat shipping companies handle their cargo with better care than the airlines, which is a definite consideration. Yeah, it takes longer to ship by water, but pack sample vials of your favorite/must have inks in your carry-on, and that should tide you over until the bottled inks are back in your possession.

 

Also, if you bring any ink in a carry-on, don't overfill the bottles or sample vials. The pressurization can make for a mess, even if you seal them well. Leave at least a finger-width of air at the top (most bottled inks are already at this level), and then seal it well with plastic wrap over the bottle then screwing on the top. Or tape it well, or whatever. Then put the ink in a Ziploc bag.

 

Unless you want ink exploding all over the innards of your luggage...

Yes, I've gleaned that it's better to have heat than cold....we're going with the POD, packed near the bottom rather than the top. I've tightened all lids, will place in ziplocks, and pack in their boxes inside another box. What could possibly go wrong. :) Hey, it's just ink my husband keeps reminding me. All mostly replaceable and if I protect the surroundings from the ink, localized damage. I've stopped getting attached to ink after my GOAT Caribbean Sea turned funky green stored in a cool inside cabinet. All things are fleeting.

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Ghost Plane

Thank you! I'm thinking I'm going with POD packing. With careful packaging.

 

POD worked for me in Florida in July. Boxes stacked in plastic bins with lids. Bottles wrapped in plastic bubble in plastic bins. Everything was in good shape at the other end as the movers loaded them next to my good china in the POD.

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amberleadavis

The trick that WebGeckos taught me about the special tape was really helpful because Colorado is so HIGH that when traveling with ink bottles the lids/caps can come loose. I'd use that tape and then send them via pod.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).



Want to get a special letter / gift from me, then create a Ghostly Avatar



Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 366 Inks in 2016



Check out inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

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