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Platinum Procyon New Model


Olya
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The section on Procyon looks exactly like that of 3776. Just wondering if anyone has tried swapping the sections?

 

I had not thought of doing this, but yes, they are swappable. I just checked.

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Can anyone compare the Procyon's new steel nib with the 3776 gold soft nib? How do they compare in terms of softness and flex?

 

The metal nib is pretty stiff. My medium 3776 14K is much softer / has more spring to it. Actually, I have a couple of older steel nibbed 3776 pens and they are also springier than the Procyon's. If you want line variation, I would not recommend this pen.

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The metal nib is pretty stiff. My medium 3776 14K is much softer / has more spring to it. Actually, I have a couple of older steel nibbed 3776 pens and they are also springier than the Procyon's. If you want line variation, I would not recommend this pen.

so they are blatantly lying about the pens features?

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so they are blatantly lying about the pens features?

Are you specifically referring to, "The pentagon-shaped large nib that offers a superb resiliency and flexibility" and/or "Its resiliency realizes a writing feel similar to that of a gold nib in spite of being made with stainless steel"? I'd happily bet you the Japanese list price of a Platinum Procyon that I can flex its F nib and obtain as much line variation, with my usual writing style and technique for cursive English, as I do a 14K gold #3776 F nib, and that's something of a leap of faith on my part, since I don't have a Procyon (yet) but only four pens with 14K gold #3776 F nibs.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct, and valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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so they are blatantly lying about the pens features?

 

I certainly did not get it because I wanted a flexible nib. Just didn't pay any attention to the hyperboly.

 

Are you specifically referring to, "The pentagon-shaped large nib that offers a superb resiliency and flexibility" and/or "Its resiliency realizes a writing feel similar to that of a gold nib in spite of being made with stainless steel"? I'd happily bet you the Japanese list price of a Platinum Procyon that I can flex its F nib and obtain as much line variation, with my usual writing style and technique for cursive English, as I do a 14K gold #3776 F nib, and that's something of a leap of faith on my part, since I don't have a Procyon (yet) but only four pens with 14K gold #3776 F nibs.

 

Perhaps you could, but I'm pretty sure you would have to exert much more pressure to do so and frankly, I'd be worried about springing the nib. It's somewhat strange that the photo accompanying this claim shows writing with zero line variation, is it not? Draw your own conclusions.

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It's somewhat strange that the photo accompanying this claim shows writing with zero line variation, is it not?

I don't think it's strange at all. Some folks here seem to have a very narrow and inflexible view of what flex or flexibility means; worse still, they logically equate 'flex' – as a characteristic of the nib – with line variation in (specifically, cursive English) writing output that requires little effort. Why would anyone expect Platinum to showcase line variation in a writing sample, as if it was a capability on which it was selling or marketing the product?

 

I don't have a Procyon to try out, but there is no reason for me to believe its nib cannot produce something similar to this:

fpn_1545140910__flexing_a_platinum_balan

 

That was written with a similarly shaped steel F nib on a Platinum Balance pen. I could see the tines elastically deform (without spreading apart sideways all that much) without 'springing', when I apply deliberate pressure when writing; they return to their original shape quickly once I release the pressure. That speaks to flexibility (or 'springy-ness') of the nib material. My Platinum #3776 F nibs and President F nibs aren't any softer or more flexible than that.

Edited by A Smug Dill

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct, and valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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A soft nib is not a flex nib, it is a soft nib. That one may obtain minor line variation with a soft nib does not change it's function or manufacture. If you want a flexible nib for the purpose of line variation, you buy a flexible nib. Softness is a nib characteristic that is experienced by the user of the pen, not the viewer of the written line.

"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."

~ Benjamin Franklin

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I had not thought of doing this, but yes, they are swappable. I just checked.

Thanks for this. When you insert the 3776 section on the procyon, did you have any problem closing the cap (since the nib is much bigger)?

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A soft nib is not a flex nib, it is a soft nib. That one may obtain minor line variation with a soft nib does not change it's function or manufacture.

My point is that nobody here can dictate the frame of reference by which Platinum made its statements about the resiliency and flexibility of the Procyon's nib. The statements do not necessarily mean that the tines with spread apart or splay elastically when (minimal?) pressure is applied, thus allowing the pen user to achieve swells in calligraphic or cursive writing; 'flexibility' can be evidenced in elastic deformation (and then springing back) in any plane or direction, in response to variation in the pressure applied to the nib.

 

Therefore, even if the Procyon nib does not do what sneak3 (or anyone else who is after their preconceived idea of a 'flex(ible)' nib) expects of it, it still does not follow that Platinum is 'blatantly lying'. The manufacturer cannot be held responsible for the individual prospective customer's or user's misunderstanding and/or misinterpretation arising from personal wants and biases.

 

Softness is a nib characteristic that is experienced by the user of the pen, not the viewer of the written line.

The same is true for flexibility of a nib.

 

Now, dan in montreal says that his 14K gold Platinum #3776 'is much softer' and 'has more spring to it' while his Procyon's nib is 'pretty stiff', and disputes Platinum's claim that, "Its resiliency realizes a writing feel similar to that of a gold nib in spite of being made with stainless steel," that's a different matter. I haven't tried using a Procyon pen or nib myself and don't have access to one today, but I certainly have Platinum steel F nibs in a similar shape to that on the Procyon that feels 'softer' and 'springier' than the Platinum #3776 F nibs (and I have several of the latter as well as the former). Could Platinum's statement about the Procyon's nib be true after all? I certainly still think so, even if one Procyon user reported his subjective experience to be otherwise.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct, and valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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My statement was to be taken on it's own, in reflection of the recent posts in the thread but not in any direct contradiction or commentary to any particular post (well, the post that suggests "softness and flex" was certainly an inspiration).

As to someone talking about marketing copy being about lying, it's advertising. It isn't testimony in court - every single alphanumeric character should be taken with a mountain of salt.

Edited by JonSzanto

"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."

~ Benjamin Franklin

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So called soft nibs are not flexible by any stretch of the imagination. Not at all.

{When you wish upon a star Your dreams come true..Pinocchio..1940 Jiminy Cricket ..conscience}

 

Advertising..most dunno a thing about it 'cept it's nice sounding.

 

Quite true. One man's good old advertising hyperbole is another man's major league irritant.

 

Fred

 

Are you trying to show contempt for this court?....Judge

 

No, your honor, I'm doin' my best to hide it. ......Flower Bell Lee..My Little Chickadee..1940

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Thanks for this. When you insert the 3776 section on the procyon, did you have any problem closing the cap (since the nib is much bigger)?

Steve, they are compatible. Having put the 3776 nib and section in the Procyon, the Procyon's cap screws on just fine, despite the nib being much larger.

 

Just to be super clear: the 3776 section and nib fit the Procyon's body.

The older 3776 pens without the updated cap seal do not fit the Procyon's body and cap.

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Steve, they are compatible. Having put the 3776 nib and section in the Procyon, the Procyon's cap screws on just fine, despite the nib being much larger.

 

Just to be super clear: the 3776 section and nib fit the Procyon's body.

The older 3776 pens without the updated cap seal do not fit the Procyon's body and cap.

Thanks again for the info. There a crack developing in my 3776, so this would be useful should it become unusuable.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Haven't seen many reviews of this pen.

Are the threads on the section sharp, smooth, distracting, not?

When writing, does the nib feel more like the steel-nibbed Platinum Cool/Balance or like the even softer gold-nibbed Platinum Kanazawa/PTL5000?

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Yes there are a few of the reviews online and suddenly it seems that online retailers are not promoting the product at all.

Wonder what is going on.

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It's not the gold nib, or less than $25.

 

In one youtube review, it seemed the nib had a distinct softness, more like a Kanazawa nib than a Cool nib. I'm curious if that's typical or if that reviewer was heavy handed...

Then there's threads on the section...

Edited by cattar
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  • 3 weeks later...

How does the Procyon's feed / ink flow keep up with very fast lines (e.g. in the case of drawing)?

(As a comparison what I call good or bad: the Lamy Safari clearly cannot handle fast lines, while a 3776 surely can.) Thanks!

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  • 8 months later...

Is the finish of the pen sturdy? In an other thread I saw somebody complaining about the finish flaking off after two months ownership. Is this something that other people experienced as well?

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