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Platinum Procyon New Model


Olya
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I had done it on a inexpensive Chinese pen so not too bothered by the warranty void (even if there is any).

 

Regarding the wetness of the ink, I completely agree. My Pilot Metro usually lays a thin controlled line with Diamine inks, but put the J.Herbin EoC and then boom, it turns the line wider. Love the Pelikan inks for the reverse effect, their dryness sometimes has it moments.

 

By the way, sorry if this topic derails the thread. It is an interesting discussion topic, couldn't resist

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I got mine a few days ago (in dark blue - nice finish, it looks as if it will hold up well) and out of the box, the medium nib was super dry. I have to say this was expected, based on the reviews I've seen and read.

 

Mind you I did NOT flush it before popping in a cart, and had no knowledge of the wetness / dryness of the ink (mine came with the 3 Platinum mixed ink carts - the one I am using is called Dark Violet). It was super dry. Upon inspection with a loupe, the tines were too tight, which explains why I really had to press down to get it flowing.

I removed the cart, and pulled the nib + feed unit from the section (friction fit). I did not remove the nib from the feed as it's kind of clamped on (and I did not want to muck around with it too much) - cleaned them in soapy water, spread the tines and reassembled the thing and now it works like a charm. If this seems like too much work, you might want to get something else.

 

Is this pen ever going to be a super wet and juicy writer? Of course not. However, it writes well, the flow is decent if on the dry side, but that's what I expected, based on my experience with the Plaisir / Preppy. That's the model type. Like every fountain I've ever owned, I had to tweak it to get it to write like I want it to. This pen is no different. It's the extent of the tweaking that varies, from pen to pen and model to model.

 

Anyway, the nib is smooth, I like the weight of the pen, it's solidly built, it's got a screw cap which I like, the cap seal is good, the metal on metal threads are smooth. All in all I got what I paid for (the seller even supplied a converter - which I don't think is always the case with this model). Do I like it more than my 3776 pens? No. It's another model, and it serves another purpose.

Edited by dan in montreal
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I think it has been generally known that the 3776 is a feedbacky pen, especially the finer nibs.

 

It depends entirely upon your choice of paper.

 

Use your #3776 with CD note's premium (Japanese) CD paper and the nib is as smooth as butter.

 

if your #3776 is scratchy, try a different (Japanese) paper.

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I think it has been generally known that the 3776 is a feedbacky pen, especially the finer nibs.

 

It depends entirely upon your choice of paper.

 

Use your #3776 with CD note's premium (Japanese) CD paper and the nib is as smooth as butter.

 

if your #3776 is scratchy, try a different (Japanese) paper.

 

It is actually kind of feedbacky in my experience, don't take this as the same as scratchy though.

Even on smooth Pelikan paper notes souvenir that was provided on the Hubs yesterday (which is one of the smoothest paper I owned), I can still feel the feedback 3776 gives.

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  • 5 weeks later...

I got mine a few days ago (in dark blue - nice finish, it looks as if it will hold up well) and out of the box, the medium nib was super dry. I have to say this was expected, based on the reviews I've seen and read.

 

Mind you I did NOT flush it before popping in a cart, and had no knowledge of the wetness / dryness of the ink (mine came with the 3 Platinum mixed ink carts - the one I am using is called Dark Violet). It was super dry. Upon inspection with a loupe, the tines were too tight, which explains why I really had to press down to get it flowing

I bought the blue procyon as well, medium nib. The purple cartridge did ok for a day, then it got drier until it barely wrote

 

I now have Noodler's walnut in it, and it writes like a dream ❤

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By cracking I of course mean it's a good pen rather than any materials issue.

 

Thanks for the British-to-English translation! :lol:

Scientia potentia est.

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Interesting-looking pen, but since at this point every seller on Rakuten and Amazon.co.jp want ¥5,400 (inclusive of 8% consumption tax in Japan) for it, yet I can get a Platinum #3776 Century 'Black in Black' with a 14K gold EF nib for ¥5,697 (tax inclusive), I just can't bring myself to do it, even if free engraving service is thrown in for the Procyon at the list price.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct, and valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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I own 6 of those pens. None fit your description and never did.

 

I've had one 3776 SF that I bought as a gift that was scratchy and way too dry. It needed to be tuned, but doing so took two minutes.

 

I had to return a UEF since it was unusably scratchy and dry. But that nib is probably a NIGHTMARE to grind an I do not doubt it has a higher number of duds than anything else in the line.

 

But all four 3776's I have now are superb, if a bit dry for my specific tastes (which border on "firehose? Yes please.") from the factory (easily remedied)

 

I'm into the procyon but not at that price. Let me pick it up for $30 and I'll buy one.

Edited by Honeybadgers

Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)

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  • 2 weeks later...

I got one, Porcelain White, Fine. Have been writing exclusively with it for maybe 2 weeks now.

 

Disclaimer, I'm rather new in this hobby. My other pens are a Pilot Metro F, Lamy Safari EF, Platinum Preppy EF, TWSBI Go EF.

 

I love the Procyon. I've been waiting for it to get to me for over a month (+ shipping time) due to restock delay in North America.

I've had my eyes on it ever since I became fascinated by the smoothness of the Preppy.

 

The nib is as smooth as the Preppy EF, the construction solid, the weight distribution is great; although it's the first time I feel a pen to be comfier posted, which is how I more often use this one. Unposted it's the shortest pen I own, a bit shorter than an unposted preppy.

 

It feels as if Platinum put a lot of thought in this design. I love how the feed and the section are flush at the base of the nib. When this pen gets inked it's really easy to clean as there are no crevices which hold ink through surface tension.

The barrel and section screw in neatly, it's satisfying to open and close. Also, the threads on the section aren't bothersome in any way, they're smooth. Even the metal accent at the base of the cap has been designed to screw in neatly with the barrel. The curves are very subtle in every aspect of this design, just feels like everything comes together beautifully.

 

It seems to be a wet writer but just enough wetness to keep up with fast writing, never had any hard starts nor skipping. There is also no nib creep. The nib is flexible, but it's not a flex, the line variation doesn't come from the tines opening, but from the pressure spreading the ink on the higher surface being in contact with the paper.

 

It honestly feels like the ultimate fountain pen for me. The finish feels great, it's a modern, classy, satisfying design, immediate writer, reliable, clean filling system, good weight, solid build (but not as solid as a Metropolitan), smooth nib.
I place it in a league of its own, in the lower end of the mid-price range. If it can compete with any pen, as far as design and nib smoothness go for a mass-produced pen, it would probably be the Lamy Aion (if the nib feels anything like a CP1 or Safari because I'm not certain about that).

 

For now I can say with certainty that it's a better writer and offers a better writing experience, plus the pleasant aesthetics and subtle design elements, than all the other pens I own. I honestly feel it's worth its price at 52.80 USD.

 

I've tried also the Faber-Castell Loom because I've heard many people praise it and the Procyon still feels better.

Oh, maybe the Pilot Prera can compete with the Procyon in build quality and writing experience. I'm not a big Prera fan design-wise, but it's a really nice writer and the capping experience is highly satisfying.

These two comparisons are only from what I tried in a shop though, so take that with a grain of salt.

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For now I can say with certainty that it's a better writer and offers a better writing experience, plus the pleasant aesthetics and subtle design elements, than all the other pens I own. I honestly feel it's worth its price at 52.80 USD.

 

I've tried also the Faber-Castell Loom because I've heard many people praise it and the Procyon still feels better.

Oh, maybe the Pilot Prera can compete with the Procyon in build quality and writing experience. I'm not a big Prera fan design-wise, but it's a really nice writer and the capping experience is highly satisfying.

These two comparisons are only from what I tried in a shop though, so take that with a grain of salt.

 

Very interesting claim on the comparison with FC Loom. The price is still the thing that makes me itch about the Procyon, maybe if it is $10 cheaper then I would take a punt at it.

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Platinum's quality control is good. What varies is the wetness of the nibs.


What I mean by that is -- the actual nib, tine cut, and tipping of Platinum nibs is very consistent... but the gap between the tines or the tightness at which they touch has a lot of variation. (Same for Pilot, especially, and also Sailor to some degree. And other brands.) This gap (or tightness-of-touching) is what determines wetness. Wetness plays an enormous role in how smooth a nib feels on paper.


In regards to wetness, there is a chance you will get a 3776 Century that writes too dry for your preference, and there is a chance you can get one that is so dry it won't write at all. Of the 15 or so I've purchased this has happened at least three times.


More rarely you may get a 3776 Century that writes too wet. Just recently I bought an EF and an F at the same time and the EF wrote wider out of the box as a result.


Platinum pens are known for having "feedback." Some people refer to this feedback in regards to the finer nibs: F, EF, UEF. Others are referring to dryness.


Some people get an overly dry 3776 Century and confuse the nib feel with being "scratchy" -- but scratchiness is a subtly different issue, and requires a different solution than wetness.


People keep saying Platinum or Pilot make their pens "dry for the Japanese market." But that doesn't explain why some of them arrive writing unusually wet. I've also gotten Lamy nibs with the same issue, and I don't think Lamy is making nibs "dry for the German (or American) market."


What we're talking about here is a manufacturing tolerance in regards to the tine gap. It explains why people have such strong and different opinions. They're having actual differences in experience.


It's important to note that the wetness of a nib is the easiest thing to correct. The tipping, the tine cut, the fit of the nib to the feed - all of those things Platinum gets right.


I would advise anyone with a dry Platinum nib to check out this link: https://imgur.com/a/owGN5mZ as well as the links and writeup below.


Never would I advise someone to adjust their own expensive nib if they don't know what they are doing, but the info there can at least help someone understand the correction their overly dry Platinum nib needs.

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with so many people proclaiming they will get the pen, has anyone gotten one yet? looking forward to your pleasant experience.

Well many people do have it and have written about it, myself included.

 

I've tried also the Faber-Castell Loom because I've heard many people praise it and the Procyon still feels better.

Oh, maybe the Pilot Prera can compete with the Procyon in build quality and writing experience. I'm not a big Prera fan design-wise, but it's a really nice writer and the capping experience is highly satisfying.

These two comparisons are only from what I tried in a shop though, so take that with a grain of salt.

The Procyon feels sturdier than both the Loom and Prera. Perhaps it's just an impression. Time will tell. For now, I prefer it to both these models. Is it overpriced? I don't know. Is the Prera? I have all three of these models and I tend to prefer the Platinum because of the screw cap and the fact it feels so robust and solid.

 

 

Very interesting claim on the comparison with FC Loom. The price is still the thing that makes me itch about the Procyon, maybe if it is $10 cheaper then I would take a punt at it.

I'm thinking of getting a fine nibbed version, but I'm holding off until the price lowers (I imagine it will, eventually). It's in a weird category. It's only slightly less expensive than a gold nib Century shipped from Japan, but more expensive than the FC Basic / Loom. and Pilot Prera. About the same price as the Lamy Aion. Perhaps this is the model I would liken it to most. Same feel, althought the Procyon has a much shorter section and the threads might be bothersome - personally, I don't mind.

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I'm thinking of getting a fine nibbed version, but I'm holding off until the price lowers (I imagine it will, eventually). It's in a weird category. It's only slightly less expensive than a gold nib Century shipped from Japan, but more expensive than the FC Basic / Loom. and Pilot Prera. About the same price as the Lamy Aion. Perhaps this is the model I would liken it to most. Same feel, althought the Procyon has a much shorter section and the threads might be bothersome - personally, I don't mind.

 

It is in a confusing price range for the reason you stated, probably the same as the Sailor ProColor range (although the ProColor has some unique finishes like the Stardust)

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Can anyone who currently owns a Procyon tell me: is the section any thicker than, say, the Pilot Custom 74. The section, to my eye, looks a bit thick.

 

Thanks!

Adam

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Can anyone who currently owns a Procyon tell me: is the section any thicker than, say, the Pilot Custom 74. The section, to my eye, looks a bit thick.

 

Thanks!

Adam

The Procyon's section is thicker near the nib. Here it is with the 74:

 

post-26075-0-66986100-1544199308.jpg

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