Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

InkyPoetess
 Share

Recommended Posts

I haven't gotten huge into inks yet, mostly playing around with Goulet samples. Currently, I have a nearly full bottle of Noodler's, but I can imagine that bottle being a pain to use once it gets low. I've been playing around with the idea of adding an empty bottle to my next order. There are a couple that are just gorgeous and seem like they would be much more practical when low.

That said I have a small income and even smaller apartment (one of the big reasons I got into fountain pens was to reduce my carbon footprint and clutter of having half-empty pens everywhere). Is this a good functional investment? For those of you who have done this is it worth the time and effort of decanting the ink into the new bottle or is it one of those things where you could take it or leave it?

 

I realize it's a low cost item, it's more being in a place of reducing my consumption in general.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 21
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • PAKMAN

    1

  • Bo Bo Olson

    4

  • sidthecat

    1

  • InkyPoetess

    2

Im pretty sure you can buy empty bottles vs an actual ink well. Iroshizuku bottles hold 50ml and have a divit in the bottom to help with those last drops. Another easy and likely less expensive option is to get an ink syringe to use in any bottle that is running low

Link to comment
Share on other sites

+1 on the syringe, they are super useful anyway. Save a couple of those sample vials. You can dump the dregs into one of them when the big bottles get to low for your pens.

 

That or get a vintage Sheaffer snorkel...

 

Cheers!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

buy an ink which come with a functional bottle and re use / recycle it after the ink been exhausted, that's what most of us do. Yes there are inkwell to be had but I've found that basically unneccessary ; unless you are dedicated artist / calligrapher. Instead I just goto the kitchen and outcome that shooter glass. I too use syringe but as a scale modeller ( my other hobby ) I use industrial grade precesion syringe ( used to appl;y adhesive ) that measure 1ml with a screw on blunt tip ( which I can replace if damaged and had different gauge and length to match the need, long one for those tricky bottles ). I use the syringe to transfer ink to the shooter glass which also function as my inkwell when I am doing art , drawing etc with dip pen. and that shooter glass serve well enough when I need to just re fill my fountain pensl; any left over I can either drain it back into the bottle or I can use the syringe to again transfer it back. The syringe is really useful for that last 10 or less ml of ink indeed.

 

Some of those ink sample container ( actually they are lab sample vial ) could be useful but generally I've found them to be a hassle since they are usually too narrow to allow for many of my pens. Empty ink bottles can be sourced easily, and some of the best ( and worst ) can be found on online retail.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have the little Goulet sample bottles, pour remaining bottled ink into those. They are easy to fill from. But without a syringe it's almost impossible to avoid inky waste.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ink wells unless they are screw caps, are not for modern change your ink weekly time. The ink will dry out fairly quickly. If you are using just one ink....inkwells are fine. or just two pens each with it's own ink

If not bottles are the way to go. If the ink was any good, then just pour it into the new bottle. If the ink was not worth buying again, needle syringe it....if it is worth it.

 

Double inkwells were for business....black or blue and red for bookkeeping.

Single are of more use, in you can use the ink up faster.....if you let the ink set too long, some of it will evaporate so you will need to add a few drops of water. If you use only that ink, you have no problems.

The problems start when you butterfly between inks. There are screw top single ink wells, I do have a couple.....but most of my singles are the old flip top ones.

 

Sterling silver top, crystal well @'30's?....and a classic bollard style @1880-1920s in silver plate. The little brush is for cleaning your nib.

kjcOV93.jpg

 

1920-30's

SJwaZUl.jpg

Art Nouveau 1900-1910

L5Re5lC.jpg

 

 

Art Decco 1920's black glass, gilded brass, and crystal inkwells.

eVDStJt.jpg

 

Art Decco, French 1925 birds eye maple veneer.

pCCFiwl.jpg

 

Bauhaus....1920's

z7EDizq.jpg

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a plastic syringe that was designed for dispensing oral medications to a cat. It is useful not only for getting the last fills of ink out of a bottle, but also for flushing pens with distilled water to clean them. It is very common for a vet to include a plastic syringe with a prescription, so if you have friends with pets, they might have extras.

 

If you decide you want to be able to decant ink from a larger bottle to a small one--for example, if you were going on a road trip and wanted to take a smaller rather than a larger bottle of ink--spending money on an empty ink bottle is not the only option. When I use the last of a spice that comes in a little glass jar, I often save the jar to use as an inkwell for brush calligraphy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When ink gets low, especially in some of the bottles that are hard to fill from, it might be worth getting some sample vials to decant into. I find that they are very useful to use as inkwells (rather than pouring from one bottle into another, even of the same ink) and double as great traveling inkwells. You can use an eyedropper or syringe to empty the bottle and then fill the vials. The vials are cheap and easier to refill than a full bottle, and way more transportable.

The only downside is that they tend to multiply -- especially when you start buying samples, because then you have to buy the vial trays to store them, and then you have to figure out an inventory system.... :rolleyes:

Ruth Morrisson aks inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It might also be worth a trip to your local pharmacy and buying a universal sample container. They are leak proof and hold up to 30ml usually and the internal base normally has a dip which is suitable for nibs. Cheap and ideal for travelling.

 

If you get stuck on this pm me and I can post you a couple to try out.

 

Al

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you do go the route of buying an empty ink bottle from Goulet, there are some good discussions in the "Inky Thoughts" forum on the most liked/most useful ink bottles by manufacturer.

 

 

Edited by ErrantSmudge
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

If you decant into an empty bottle, it would assist memory to label the bottle with the ink name.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Very unfunctional inkwell. ;) In I would need a lots bigger desk.

Was given to someone(s) of importance after a major German victory on the Eastern Front in 1915. It's a foot high. Silver plated.

 

SUbl67h.jpg

CECyonf.jpg

 

d4q2rug.jpg

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My solution for an almost empty bottle is to break out a Sheaffer Snorkle and draw out that last bit of ink!

PAKMAN

minibanner.gif                                    Vanness-world-final.png.c1b120b90855ce70a8fd70dd342ebc00.png

                                                 My Favorite Pen Restorer                                 My Favorite Brick and Mortar Store

                                                                                                                                Vanness Pens - Now selling Online!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a number of syringes around the house from several bouts of wound care, and I like to store inks in 30ml Nalgene bottles, which are a better shape for my smallish pens. For my smallest pens, those 10ml sample bottles are very useful.

 

The problem with most inkwells is that they're not airtight, so the ink will dry.

Edited by sidthecat
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't gotten huge into inks yet, mostly playing around with Goulet samples. Currently, I have a nearly full bottle of Noodler's, but I can imagine that bottle being a pain to use once it gets low. I've been playing around with the idea of adding an empty bottle to my next order. There are a couple that are just gorgeous and seem like they would be much more practical when low.

 

That said I have a small income and even smaller apartment (one of the big reasons I got into fountain pens was to reduce my carbon footprint and clutter of having half-empty pens everywhere). Is this a good functional investment? For those of you who have done this is it worth the time and effort of decanting the ink into the new bottle or is it one of those things where you could take it or leave it?

 

I realize it's a low cost item, it's more being in a place of reducing my consumption in general.

 

I *really* like the Caran D'Ache bottles. They are functional and an excellent aesthetic addition to your desk. To my knowledge, Goulet are the only ones selling these empty (and a full bottle is rather expensive) and they have a very limited amount on hand. Basically the empties from their ink sample business.

 

I keep a giant bottle of Pelikan 4001 hidden away from sight, also a couple of Pilot 350ml "Coke bottles" and refill the little glass bottles as needed.

 

-k

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ink wells can be very cool and fun decorative items, but not so practical. I write with dip pens a lot and even I don't use them. I use Dinky Dips with screw-on caps. Ink wells were made for extensive, daily use and the ink would evaporate and have to be filled every day.

 

For your use, getting the last of the ink from the bottle, I agree with the suggestion of the ink sample vial. My only problem with these is their tendency to tip over. I solved this by building a quick holder out of Legos. They fit into a 2x2 Lego square perfectly. Build up some sides around it, put it on a wider base and you have a great ink sample vial holder.

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do have a few screw on silver cap inkwells and one real nice round bubbled glass softball sized press down to seal one.

 

Ink wells like I have are great for the one or two ink man. Then there is no problem.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      37808
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      30915
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. jar
      jar
      26101
    5. wimg
      wimg
      25595
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • Matthew TWP
      @Ruaidhri This was an absolutely wonderful bit of writing, and I hope that you're able to maintain the style once all of the medications are out of your system.  Take care and recover quickly!
    • Dr.X
      Very punny daniel
    • danielfalgerho
      These comments make me sad as I sympathise with Ruaidhri, having great difficulties in being taken seriously. Or being taken at all (no off-colors jokes, please!) In spite of overwhelming odds,  Ruaidhri -now I know how to spell it- made a courageous decision and stuck to it. I was diagnosed with a similar growth in a place I will not reveal. Oh, well, if you insist it was Mount Sinai Hospital. But I firmly intend to walk in Ruaidhri's footsteps, if he will let me, on my next visit to Dublin.
    • ParramattaPaul
      Reminds me of the day my associates and I developed a cure for all mankind's ills and mistakenly wrote it down with invisible ink.
    • AnneD
      Was that the end of the Laboratory? Somehow the exactitude created a fully destructive device, as always!
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Expiring Soon

    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 11 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 11 months
  • Random Adverts

    • By jiamu166
      51 years and 11 months
    • By Miles R.
      EXPIRED
    • By jhsd1124013561
      51 years and 11 months
    • By alfarome
      51 years and 11 months
    • By ravatar
      51 years and 11 months
  • Files

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. alborticus
      alborticus
      (40 years old)
    2. ardvarticus
      ardvarticus
      (28 years old)
    3. BB Crafts
      BB Crafts
    4. bbqncigars
      bbqncigars
      (82 years old)
    5. Caneta
      Caneta
      (55 years old)





×
×
  • Create New...