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Lifehacker Weighs In On Pens



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  • Honeybadgers

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Bo Bo Olson

The ultimate of weirdness,, is a Mao Jacket.

 

I have no need of 70-90 or more pens. could get by just fine with 20....or even 15; but one has to find out exactly what one likes and that takes a few pens too many.

Do have a need of the 70 inks,and could do with half the 50 papers I have.

 

Mechanical watches, cost so much more in upkeep than a battery one.....and I like the ones of my youth, thin..the thinner the better the watch, not so 1890's huge thick one has to wear it on the outside of one's long shirt sleeve. Finally got the De Ville, next up a Constellation; automatic of course.

 

Have just enough pocket knives....7-8, though could go for the right bladed real stag Remington, that I once had eon's ago. I do admire a pretty knife. And even some ugly ones from the '20-30's when function and balance was what those three masters made fro every day users. Ruana, Bill Scagel... :notworthy1: :thumbup:...those were a bit before my time

Morseth.........dam I always regret not getting one of them....His Cascade was the first knife that impressed the hell out of me....even if it was not a Bowie.

 

I ran into this picture yesterday......a most efficient cut and thrust Bowie from a time when not everyone had one of them newfangled 5 shot Colt Patterson revolving pistols.

6IMQOSt.jpg

Antique Bowie Knife c. 1840's-1850's by Sheffield, England maker, Edward Barnes, who devoted much of his energies toward the American market in the years prior to The Civil War. 17 inches overall and weighing 2 ½ pounds, it is fitted with a 12 inch single edge blade with a long, arched, clip point having a 6 ½ inch " false" edge. Though called a "Bowie," it does not have the shape of the original used by Bowie himself.

No one knows what the original Bowie looked like.

 

I do not believe James Black ever even made a Bowie knife; much less The Bowie...in when a bit demented couldn't make one ... and I don't think something that important in one's life would have been forgotten. Number two, a black smith likes money like anyone else, and would have made made many more Bowies....and never did....being only known because he in his old age claimed he did, and would give the secret of what the original Bowie looked like, in folks were taking care of the old man, who'd never saved for old age.....

 

 

 

More than likely the one at the Sandbar fight was much like the one made for Jim's brother Rezen by Searles of Baton Roughe....slightly swept point, no clip , .... more than likely wasn't a clip blade knife; which were not IN yet. Nor were fighting guards.... From the 1780's on the Americans on the frontiers were called Big Knives by the Indians.....being part Indian...am not going to be politically correct. The Antler or deer foot handled knives were long bladed, but....nothing to get into a knife fight with. :P So long bladed knives were common. The next generation....Rezin Bowie, had a good handle. But no fighting guard..

 

Clip bladed knives were not foreign to Europe. The falchion was one and many a Bowie look like a shrunk down falchion.

The George Wostenholm company claims Jim Bowie had a Wostenholm I*XL Bowie with him at the Alamo....and it is possible. Sheffield knives were better than US made knives. And George the third made many selling trips to America.....so could well have sailed from NY to New Orleans to speak to the famous knife fighter; any really astute business man in the knife making business would have. One would have sent Bowie one for free....what great advertising.

 

Handle of the Barnes knife could be better...but not all that bad for the times. (But one must remember the 'coffin handle was stylish on Bowie's then also). The blade could be a tad thinner ...a bit lighter....but the percussion point 1/3 into the blade makes this a very efficient hacking blade. On second thought, the false edge is just right....so one can grip and throw the the little monster, it wouldn't be a safe thrower with the sharp false edge going all the way up.

 

That is something that could have been made by Ruana, himself.....not the stuff they make under his name now that he's been dead so many decades. The big hefty ugly functional, don't care if it's the "Alamo or big Grizzly" type of Bowie, that could be thrown.

 

I've been weird about knives ever since I was a kid watching Daniel Boone, and Davy Crocket movies and TV shows in the late '50's.....and Mac the Knife was a neat TV show, of a knife thrower in modern times. And we all grew up with that little murderess, Orphan Annie.....who with an underhand thrown knife. killed a man a month in the daily comics So I can understand that part of my weirdness.

The biggest shock of my whole 8 years was at the Alamo, Davy Crockett was wearing a SUIT!!! :yikes:.....and didn't look anything like Fess Parker. :huh:

 

Have to admit, coming from the days of One Man, One Pen....having 70-100 of them is a tad weird. :bunny01:

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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Calling a fountain pen user a weirdo is the same to me to call a mechanical watch wearer a weirdo. It's the same thing.

Guess that makes me king weirdo. Mechanical pocket watch.

Peace and Understanding

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if my kids (very grow up now) would spend one tenth of the time they spend ruining their eyesight on a 5 inch screen, writing with a fountain pen (of which they could borrow several different versions at no cost from dad...), I'd be happy if anyone found that weird...

When the money goes into those instruments of "depravation" (as I am forced to use one too) I know it doesn't cost less than my pens... and they have a rate of breaking them and losing them that sometimes I wonder whether it's a "sort of" collection...

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Lifehacker = Philistines! ;)

 

I suspect that rather than philistinism, that article was mostly down to Uniball and Muji paying them a substantial bribe.

:P

(I love that there's a non FP using fan of disposables blathering that he likes to refill his gel pens with Noodlers ink, though: I suspect he won the office hipster-off the article documents...)

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Bo Bo Olson

What is wrong with pocket watches? Any good jeans has a pocket watch pocket. B) ....do have to admit, my 14 K gold inherited one is battery :( .....all rest 19) including the machined silver hunter cased Omega are mechanical.

 

See my signature.....found a gold mine of very good pocket watch chains, just a month ago.

My few (all but the gold one) are too cheap to really display and the gold chain is really too much for a metal or silver pocket watch. But an 80 year old watch repairman I ran into a month or so ago, has a lifetime's worth; so many fine designs. :notworthy1: :puddle:

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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My favorite is a Turkish railroad retirement watch, commissioned by Demirylo(sp?) and made in the U.S.S.R

Peace and Understanding

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Never heard of LifeHacker.

 

Like fountain pens.

 

Pity the unwashed masses.

Consider yourself lucky to have never hear of them.

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You're all much too weird for me. I'm out. LATER NERDS.

A quote from earlier this week at work. "When you're the weird guy in a room of weird guys, you're effing weird." :lol:

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Honeybadgers

Some people think I'm weird for using a fixed blade knife on my belt when I'm on duty (the CRKT obake) But being able to just reach behind myself and pull a knife out in half the time it takes anyone else to get theirs out has certainly expedited aspects of patient care.

Edited by Honeybadgers

Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)

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SoulSamurai

Some people think I'm weird for using a fixed blade knife on my belt when I'm on duty (the CRKT obake) But being able to just reach behind myself and pull a knife out in half the time it takes anyone else to get theirs out has certainly expedited aspects of patient care.

How about something with an Emmerson Wave?
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Honeybadgers

How about something with an Emmerson Wave?

 

Just googled it and it's a bad idea to draw a knife that you can't guarantee will hit its lock. Also, most of us have a flashlight and/or trauma shears over our pockets, and when you're down on your knees doing CPR, your pockets are pinching anything in there. I've been in more than enough situations where my assist opener was just binding in my pocket as I tried to get at it. With the Obake on my belt (it mounts in-line with the belt and is held in with friction) I can pull it in a quarter second with absolute certainty that it'll be ready to go. It's great for hitting seatbelts, tape, bound clothes, IV bags taped to the pole, all sorts of stuff.

Edited by Honeybadgers

Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)

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Bo Bo Olson

CRKT obake....looks small enough and fancy.

 

I've grown to like the Finnish knives-,puukko, simple, well balanced, fully hand fitting handle.Inexpensive.

I have two, my fancy one is Beech burl, flat antler grip top, with four thumb blood grooves on the left side for right handers, in it has no real hilt. The other one has a bit of a bottom hilt. Don't know anything about the blades other than they are and remain very sharp. One is stainless, the other carbon.

Knives I'd not admired when young and dumb '50-70's.

 

The first Book of Knives come out @ 1970, which I have.** We have come a long way since then....but a well made knife, can be factory also. Buck makes a knife for every use, and everyone's taste of blade configuration. If you don't like the blade bevel there are other fine factory knives.

Enough blade masters to stop collecting pens for one of your exact choice for which ever job you wish to show off with. In a good pocket knife will do most of it.

** Had I gone back to the States instead of marrying a wise German wife, I'd made some....hopefully professionally....in one needs at least a garage.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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