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Pen Recommendations For Pigmented Inks



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I have found some lovely pigmented ink colors. The problem is they clog my pens rather badly. Are there any relatively inexpensive pens that are resistant to such clogging and/or work well with highly pigmented inks?

 

Thanks!

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Are they fountain pen inks? Knowing which ones (or at least the brand) might help. I've had no trouble, for example, using Sailor's pigmented ink in any pen.

 

On the other hand, the highly saturated, but not pigmented, Organics Studio Ralph Waldo Emerson Twilight Blue was too quick to dry in my Pilot Stargazer, F. I'm now thinking it would do better if I diluted it a little.

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Are they fountain pen inks? Knowing which ones (or at least the brand) might help. I've had no trouble, for example, using Sailor's pigmented ink in any pen.

 

On the other hand, the highly saturated, but not pigmented, Organics Studio Ralph Waldo Emerson Twilight Blue was too quick to dry in my Pilot Stargazer, F. I'm now thinking it would do better if I diluted it a little.

 

I've had problems with a couple of inks but the ones that I'm really keen to find a good pen match for are the J. Herbin 1607 inks. They're fountain pen inks but are almost excessively pigmented.

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I think I would use a Pilot Prera or cheaper pen like the Plumix. I swapped the Prera EF with the Plumix stub. These are decent pens. I would not use that kind of ink in my Montblancs or Parker 51s, but a Parker 45 might be a good choice. You might plan on doing some nib flossing, so I would get a few brass shims.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

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Bo Bo Olson

I think you are mistaken "pigmented" inks for supersaturated....or for glitter inks.

Herbin is not pigmented as you think.....there are Higgins, Winsor & Newton...art inks that are good for dip pens....no matter if the the box or bottle says, they are not fountain pen inks.

 

Pelikan India Font ink is OK in fountain pens....but that is not really India ink...which again is not for fountain pens.

 

By the time you chop up glitter small enough....and if glitter works instead of gold or silver....you could long before bought a bottle of that glitter ink.

Diamine may be cheaper than Herbin in glitter inks. I have the Herbin gold grey and a Diamine blue silver or such. Don't remember the costs....was a couple years between buying.

 

I don't use them much, but you can not mash, pulverize your glitter small enough to really work.

 

Two weeks of no hamburger, can of coke, cup of Starbucks less diet, or beer will give you the money for a glitter ink.

 

I gave up collecting single malt scotch for pens, papers and inks.................well almost....now down to a bottle a year....and then what? I have an empty bottle :unsure: ....can't even fill it with ink. :doh:

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Which pens?

 

I haven’t used any of the glitter inks, so I don’t have specific advice. But in general if you’re dealing with an ink that’s a suspension rather than a solution, you’ll want an easy to clean pen. Most cartridge/converter pens will be fine. They might need a long soak, an ammonia bath, some detergent or an ultrasonic cleaning, but it’ll eventually wash out.

 

Other modern easy to take apart pens like TWSBI may work.

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ErrantSmudge

You could also consider a pen that is easy to fully disassemble for cleaning.

 

 

I have a Jinhao 991 that was filled with Rohrer & Klingner SketchINK (a pigmented ink). It clogged after sitting for too long, but I was able to pull the nib and feed to thoroughly clean them.

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I would use a pen that can come apart for thorough cleaning. The easiest ones to disassemble and have become my test beds for new inks are the Esterbrook J and Parker 45. In seconds, they are apart. The Parker 45 pieces find themselves in the ultrasonic bath, and the Esterbrook gets a thorough soak when I'm using a glitter ink.

 

Buzz

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I've had problems with a couple of inks but the ones that I'm really keen to find a good pen match for are the J. Herbin 1607 inks. They're fountain pen inks but are almost excessively pigmented.

 

I have a Jinhao X450 permanently dedicated to my 1670 Herbin Rouge Hematite. That ink stains pretty bad so it's not allowed in any other pens. I once used the pen continuously for several months, just refilling it without cleaning it, and although there was some glittery crust on the nib, I never had any problems with clogging.

 

I also have a Jinhao X750 which gets a healthy diet of 1670 Herbin Emeraude de Chivor and has never clogged. EdC seems thinner and has less glitter than RH, so there's less nib crust and it cleans out of the pen easier.

fpn_1451608922__truthpil_signature_small

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  • 4 weeks later...
C-InPenmanship

Before I became aware of the difference between ink for dip pens & fountain pens, I used a bottle of ink that came in a glass dip pen set in my Parker Vectors and my Lalex Zebra (my favorite workhorse) with no problems. I've still got three bottles of the "dip" ink that I'll continue using in these pens because it's my favorite color of all time- Tobacco- a perfect brownish red. For my Waterman pens and others, if I want this color I mix Waterman Audacious Red & Brown. Hope this helps.

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