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New And Improved ‘Triveni Junior’, From Fountain Pen Revolution



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Fans of Kevin Thiemann from Fountain Pen Revolution will know that he’s been selling Indian-made pens for several years now – initially sourcing and selling pen from established manufacturers, before branching out to commission and produce fountain pens, nibs and inks under his own brand name. I can no longer remember when I bought my first pen from his website – it’s lost in the mists of time! – but I can tell you that I now have a sizeable collection. It’s hard to pick a favourite from among the pens, but I do have a soft spot for his more premium quality ebonite and acrylic pens – especially the Himlaya and the Triveni. Until recently, these pens both came with the ‘traditional’ #5.5 sized FPR nib – but as of January, the Triveni is has been redesigned to incorporate the larger #6 sized nibs. And it’s one of these newer pens I want to review today – the redesigned FPR Triveni Junior, in 'Dark Blue ebonite'.

 

If you’ve followed FPR as closely as I have, you’ll know the Triveni line has undergone a number of changes over time – the first version was designed to house a plastic “Serwex MB” grip section, and typically came with a #5 flex nib. Kevin later introduced the shorter Junior version, and both were redesigned to come with their own integrated grip section in matching material… Then, more recently again, the Triveni line was redesigned to accommodate a #6 nib. Here’s a picture of four representative grip sections (with nibs) from ‘down through the ages’:

 

[Correction: top left pen is FPR Himalaya; top right is original Triveni with Serwex grip section; bottom right = Triveni 'version 2', and bottom left = the latest iteration with #6 nib.]

bEnYG6g.jpg

 

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Appearance & Design

What I’ve always appreciated about the FPR Trivenis is their no-fuss, fairly straight lines. The cap of the pen posts over the top of the barrel, so the cap is slightly larger in diameter, and both cap and body taper slightly towards the ends – but it’s not a very pronounced taper. The grip section is comparatively short, but the threads for the cap are not sharp, so gripping the pen higher up is no problem.

kznz2fN.jpg

I like the aesthetic of the Triveni Junior better than for the full-length pen – the latter I find looks a little long and thin. Then again, to be honest, I like the look of the Himalaya even more (the more tapered cap I find more aesthetically pleasing) – but these are good looking pens. I really enjoy the materials, too – the acrylic Trivenis are wonderfully colourful, while the swirled ebonite pens look sturdy and serious. I *really* like the dark blue-green accents of this model – the “deep blue” version, which to my eyes is more of a teal-black swirl.

XswwwoA.jpg

 

Construction & Quality

The Triveni is solidly constructed and well-made. I can see some scratching on the surface of the pen, probably the product of the machining process, but they’re faint enough to not bother me. Overall the Triveni is of higher quality than the cheaper pens in the Triveni line. The threads on the barrel, and between barrel and grip section, are smooth and easy to turn; the fit and finish is of good quality.

 

Weight & Dimensions

My new FPR Triveni is a fairly light pen, weighing in at 18.7g (with a converter full of ink) – the cap’s contribution to that is 6.8g. The pen cap’s diameter is 15mm at its thickest, and the barrel 13mm, while the grip section tapers down from 11mm to roughly 10.5mm – a very comfortable size (for me) for extended writing sessions.

The capped length of the pen is 130mm, and uncapped 122mm. For my hands, the pen is long enough to write with unposted, but the posted length (~160mm) will be better for some – and given the light weight of the materials, it writes comfortably either way.

 

Nib & Performance

I’ve always liked FPR’s #5.5 nibs, but have been impressed with the performance of the #6’s I’ve purchased more recently (I have a few Darjeelings, which use the same nib and feed) – and this pen was no exception. The EF nib lays down a fine, wet line, and writes very smoothly. The feed in these pens is plastic (unlike the Jaipur and Himalaya, which rely on an ebonite feed) – and may have a little more trouble keeping up with a flex nib. Nib and feed are friction fit into the grip section, but come out relatively easily.

An advantage of the Triveni over most of the other pens made by FPR (apart from the Darjeeling) is its capacity to take a #6 nib. Though the FPR nib is a little wider at the base than a #6 JoWo nib, the latter will fit very comfortably in the pen if you want to swap one in.

Here's a comparison of the new Triveni Junior to the old Triveni Jr (red swirl) and a Himalay (green swirl):

8f2pfXP.jpg

And a writing sample:

MitRdeN.jpg

 

Filling System & Maintenance

The Triveni can be used as an eyedropper pen, and can take a standard international cartridge or converter. I haven’t tried this pen in eyedropper mode – but the converter that came with the pen works well.

 

Cost & Value

The Triveni (and the Triveni Junior) is available from $39 in ebonite material, and from $45 in acrylic. That’s a little more expense than the (slightly more stylish) Himalaya – the most expensive in the FPR range, but still a pretty good price for the materials and the quality of the workmanship – and it now comes with the added advantage of a #6 nib.

 

Conclusion

I’ve always like the FPR Triveni, and over the past 5 years I’ve accumulated 7 (mostly when they were on special!). The latest iteration is my favourite, though – and it travels with me almost everywhere. It's a great pen, a great writer, and well worth the expense!

T1PtEFV.jpg

Edited by Jamerelbe
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writerstephen

Thanks for this review. I'm a fan of FPR--I have 2 Jaipurs, a Himalaya, and an Indus--and I'm ready to try the #6 Triveni Jr. Deep blue ebonite is the color I would choose. Headed over there now, I think.

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Thanks for the reply @writerstephen - I'm sure you won't regret it!

 

Just make sure you're clear what kind of nib you want: they come with the dual-tone (gold/stainless steel) nib by default, but I prefer the plain stainless steel. Kevin is more than happy to swap one in, but you *do* have to ask! (Unless you're happy with the dual-tone.)

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amberleadavis

Thank you for sharing and for the history!

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).



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Have become a huge FPR fan also. The selection and value of the pens Kevin offers is pretty close to outstanding. I currently have 2 Dilli, 2 Gurus, 3 Indus, two Jaipurs and an outstanding red acrylic Himalaya. And just for good measure, I got a Guider Marala in the teal and black ebonite which is an 11 on the scale of 10 for looks. Been looking wistfully at the Trivenis in ebonite but just haven't pulled the trigger yet. I think your review has started an itch I may have to scratch.

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Thank you for sharing and for the history!

 

Thanks for the comment! Speaking of history, this is the YouTube review that first sparked my interest - from none other than Mr SBRE Brown:

 

 

The Triveni has come a long way since then - and so has the Fountain Pen Revolution brand!

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Have just emptied the Triveni of its first converter-full of ink (Rober Oster School Blue), and reloaded with an ink that's a touch less dry. With the original ink, I found the flex nib writing a bit dry - with Noolder's Steel Blue it's fantastically 'flowy'. Here's a new writing sample, using the flex nib:

 

mOSMPYG.jpg

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Thanks for the excellent review! I especially appreciate the information that these pens can take JoWo nibs.

The size of this pen looks absolutely perfect for me. I really enjoy my Himalaya, but had wished it was just a couple millimeters shorter for my stubby fingers.

I only wish this came with an ebonite feed!

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Honeybadgers

What's the difference between this and the himalaya?

Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)

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I just made a ‘no more pens’ resolution that you made very hard to maintain now :-/

 

73 and counting: 50 here, 23(!!) to arrive.

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I just made a ‘no more pens’ resolution that you made very hard to maintain now :-/

 

73 and counting: 50 here, 23(!!) to arrive.

 

Wow! That's a lot to have in the mail at once. After surpassing 100 pens recently, I've finally figured out what types of pens I prefer and am beginning to weed out my collection. In the near future I hope to give or sell anything that doesn't get inked often.

 

Since I definitely like the Himalaya and the proportions on this one seems just right, this one is definitely on my radar for my next FPR order!

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What's the difference between this and the himalaya?

 

The Triveni comes in two sizes - the Junior and the regular (or full-size) versions. The Triveni Junior is quite close in size (i.e. length) to the Himalaya (a couple of mm shorter perhaps), while the regular pen is about 1-1 1/2 cm longer. The Trivenis are a little more cylindrical in shape, tapering only a little along the length of the barrel and hardly at all along the length of the cap - which makes the Himalaya a little more 'elegant' in my books.

 

Functionally the main differences (with the new #6 Trivenis) are as follows:

  • The Triveni has a #6 steel nib (and can easily accommodate a JoWo #6 nib), the Himalaya a #5.5 (it'll take a #5 JoWo).
  • The Triveni has a plastic feed, the Himalaya an ebonite feed.
  • The Triveni takes standard international cartridges or converters, or can be eyedropperfilled; the Himalaya has a proprietary piston-fill mechanism or can be eyedropper filled.
  • Price-wise the Himalaya has a definite advantage - $30 for ebonite or acrylic, whereas the Triveni is $39 for ebonite or $45 for acrylic. According the website the Trivenis are handmade (hand-lathed?), which may explain the price difference - but for all I know the Himalaya may be made by a similar process, just by a different manufacturer??

I really enjoy both models of pens - stylistically I favour the Himalaya, but for daily use I'm a real fan of the Triveni - despite the added cost. I now own 4 Himalayas (with one on the way), compared to 3 full-size Trivenis and 4 Triveni Juniors (with one more on the way). Only two of the Triveni Jrs have the new #6 nib, though - I bought (most of) the rest before the Himalaya came onto the market.

 

I don't *expect* to buy any more - but the new acrylic colours, combined with the Easter 20% off special, forced my hand last weekend - and for all I know a similar madness could come over me again down the track...

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ReadyFireAim

I'm glad I got a Triveni before the change.

 

For those who prefer a #5/#5.5, I know Desiderata sells a nib unit that will fit a #6 Jowo & takes the smaller Zebra-G nib size.

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I'm glad I got a Triveni before the change.

 

For those who prefer a #5/#5.5, I know Desiderata sells a nib unit that will fit a #6 Jowo & takes the smaller Zebra-G nib size.

 

So the Desiderata nib uses a #6 JoWo nib unit (the outer sleeve) but has a handmade ebonite feed which would fit #5 nibs or just the Zebra-G nibs?

Edited by TruthPil

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ReadyFireAim

 

So the Desiderata nib uses a #6 JoWo nib unit (the outer sleeve) but has a handmade ebonite feed which would fit #5 nibs or just the Zebra-G nibs?

 

The outer sleeve will fit in the Triveni and the ID of the nib unit is smaller than a regular #6 but the feed will not work on a #5 nib.

You have to make your own feed if you want to use a stainless #5 nib in the Desiderata nib unit.

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/331675-6-jowo-flex-nib-units-available/

 

I have done it and it works great but requires some effort. (Desiderata unit pictured above pen)

post-135048-0-39023500-1523089867_thumb.jpg

Pen is a Ranga 3CS-5 with Desiderata nib unit sleeve + Creaper nib & custom feed made from a FPR 6.3 mm ebonite.

Sac is Parker 51 bonded to a cut off converter and friction fit into the section.

Creaper nib ground to XXF and modified for flex.

Edited by Nail-Bender
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Very nice! So will a JoWo nib unit actually screw into the new Triveni models or are the threads different?

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ReadyFireAim

Very nice! So will a JoWo nib unit actually screw into the new Triveni models or are the threads different?

 

YIPES!...Maybe not :blush:

 

I just assumed it would but it now looks like it might not.

https://fprevolutionusa.com/collections/6-nibs-and-nib-units/products/fpr-6-chrome-flex-nib-unit

You may be stuck with a #6 nib in the new Triveni :o

 

Disregard my post #15 & #13

Edited by Nail-Bender
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Very nice! So will a JoWo nib unit actually screw into the new Triveni models or are the threads different?

No, the Triveni doesn't take a JoWo nib unit - as far as I can tell, it isn't designed to take the new nib assemblies designed for the Darjeeling either. The nib and feed are friction fit within the grip section, so they can be removed/replaced that way.

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No, the Triveni doesn't take a JoWo nib unit - as far as I can tell, it isn't designed to take the new nib assemblies designed for the Darjeeling either. The nib and feed are friction fit within the grip section, so they can be removed/replaced that way.

 

That's what I figured. You can swap a JoWo #6 nib into the FPR assembly, but you can screw in a JoWo assembly. Good enough though!

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