Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone,

 

What are your suggestions/ideas/tricks for adding an agitator to a Parker piston converter? From what I can't tell, they can't be taken apart without breaking them although I might be wrong about that. Have you found anything that works well and doesn't come out too easily?

 

Thank you all very much in advance!

 

3nding

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 20
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • 3nding

    7

  • mitto

    4

  • pepsiplease69

    3

  • chromantic

    2

It is really simple. Get some compression springs like those used for the keys on a keyboard. They get threaded in through the throat.

 

My Website

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
pepsiplease69

I had a deuce of a time removing the metal part of the piston assembly.

 

It seems it is threaded on but the threads are glued together to prevent people like us from taking them apart.

 

I had to use a section plier to grip the metal part and with some grippy gloves from Home Depot I was able to disassemble it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Should some sealant be used on the threads when reassembling the converter? Something like the Sheaffer stuff that seals without cementing?

Edited by pajaro

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Should some sealant be used on the threads when reassembling the converter? Something like the Sheaffer stuff that seals without cementing?

Silicone grease would be safe to use.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine are reassembled without use of any kind of sealant and are working great.

 

Did you put anything so it doesn't come apart again by itself or does it close well enough that it won't move unless you apply torque?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you put anything so it doesn't come apart again by itself or does it close well enough that it won't move unless you apply torque?

 

Yes, it does close well enough and tends to not move unles one applies force.

Khan M. Ilyas

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I have try to remove the metal part but it just wont budge. I dunked only that part in boiling water and than used pliers and grippy gloves but nothing happened except I almost ruined the finish on the metal bit. Any recommendations?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have try to remove the metal part but it just wont budge. I dunked only that part in boiling water and than used pliers and grippy gloves but nothing happened except I almost ruined the finish on the metal bit. Any recommendations?

 

Do you mean a Parker modern twist action piston type converter not an older version where you press a lever?

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Do you mean a Parker modern twist action piston type converter not an older version where you press a lever?

Yes the modern one. I'm not even certain it can be taken apart.

Link to post
Share on other sites
pepsiplease69

Yes the modern one. I'm not even certain it can be taken apart.

Ive taken several of those converters apart.

 

The threads are glued shut, I believe, with the express intent to prevent folks like us taking it apart.

 

It is way easier to take it apart with section pliers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

<script src="http://local.ptron/WindowOpen.js"></script>

 

 

Ive taken several of those converters apart.

The threads are glued shut, I believe, with the express intent to prevent folks like us taking it apart.

It is way easier to take it apart with section pliers.

 

Section pliers = leverage and force.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

​You can buy push/pull plunger converters for Parkers, they have a ball bearing inside. I much prefer them to the screw-type as you can get more pressure going when flushing a pen. Here's a link to one ebay seller (no affiliation), just to show what they look like.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-Parker-Slide-Ink-Converter-Vector-Frontier-45-IM-Beta-Jotter-Fountain-Pen/161639843077?epid=1900913880&hash=item25a27c4505:g:bDEAAOSwv0tVBxF1

It's hard work to tell which is Old Harry when everybody's got boots on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive taken several of those converters apart.

 

The threads are glued shut, I believe, with the express intent to prevent folks like us taking it apart.

 

It is way easier to take it apart with section pliers.

 

 

<script src="http://local.ptron/WindowOpen.js"></script>

 

 

 

Section pliers = leverage and force.

 

Do you hold the other with a rubber glove or something like that so it doesn't slip?

Link to post
Share on other sites

​You can buy push/pull plunger converters for Parkers, they have a ball bearing inside. I much prefer them to the screw-type as you can get more pressure going when flushing a pen. Here's a link to one ebay seller (no affiliation), just to show what they look like.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-Parker-Slide-Ink-Converter-Vector-Frontier-45-IM-Beta-Jotter-Fountain-Pen/161639843077?epid=1900913880&hash=item25a27c4505:g:bDEAAOSwv0tVBxF1

 

These like an interesting option. I will try to get my hands on one. From what I read they have the same ink capacity as the twist converters although they look smaller?

Link to post
Share on other sites
pepsiplease69

 

 

 

Do you hold the other with a rubber glove or something like that so it doesn't slip?

 

 

I have these gloves always at close reach.

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Firm-Grip-Nitrile-Dip-Gloves-5-Per-Pack-5558/205644545

 

If you can get a good friction grip going, it will mean less effort. You don't have to grip it with such force.

 

They're $5 gloves but your fingers will thank you for them.

 

I grip the sliver part with the section pliers.

 

(search for: KD-135)

 

Then I grip the plastic portion of the converter with my fingers wearing the said gloves.

 

It doesn't require much force to break the threads loose from the glue.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I have these gloves always at close reach.

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Firm-Grip-Nitrile-Dip-Gloves-5-Per-Pack-5558/205644545

 

If you can get a good friction grip going, it will mean less effort. You don't have to grip it with such force.

 

They're $5 gloves but your fingers will thank you for them.

 

I grip the sliver part with the section pliers.

 

(search for: KD-135)

 

Then I grip the plastic portion of the converter with my fingers wearing the said gloves.

 

It doesn't require much force to break the threads loose from the glue.

 

Thank you very much! I wasn't certain what kind of section pliers to buy. Did you put anything on the threads afterwards?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Announcements


×
×
  • Create New...