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My Twsbi Eco Ef Is Extremely Dry, How Can I Fix It?


antoipod
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When I got my Twsbi Eco with an extra-fine nib about 5 days ago and inked it up with Noodler's X-feather, the pen was so dry it wouldn't write without putting some weight on it while writing to flex the tines open a bit and when it would write it would skip like crazy. I then flushed the pen and inked it up with Parker Quink Blue-Black , the result was slightly better, it would somewhat write under it's own weight but would skip more often than it would put down a line. I heard Twsbi's EF nib should be a hair broader than Pilot's F nib but after comparing it to my Pilot Metropolitan, it seems to be a decent amount finer even though the tipping is bigger. I used a loupe to look at the nib and saw the tines were touching and very tight together so I tried to get the tines apart by following Pen Habit's video on the subject and flossing the nib with a post-it note and it worked to a degree. The pen doesn't skip anymore but still writes very dry making the ink look very light and hard to see with some colors. It seems to be a nib problem since I put in a juicy M nib and the feed kept up without issue. Any advice about how to fix the flow would be greatly appreciated. Here are some pictures comparing it to my Pilot Metropolitan

:post-139460-0-48558400-1518377984_thumb.jpgpost-139460-0-86007100-1518377991_thumb.jpgpost-139460-0-12666300-1518378250_thumb.jpg

Edited by antoipod
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Hi Antoipod,

 

You basically have two options:

 

Follow the sage advice given above and return it to TWSBI.

 

OR

 

Try spreading the tines for a few seconds on a hard round surface... I use a 1/2" diameter section of aluminum pipe and that works great for me... although varying diameters will also work... it doesn't have to be 1/2."

 

See it done here:

 

http://youtu.be/Ig5cTFv4lXo

 

But know if you do this and mess it up, you're o-u-t... it'll void the warranty.

 

Any questions? :unsure:

 

 

- Anthony

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Just to follow-up... with a third option... the nib and feed pull straight out on the ECO... you could just replace the nib itself and it would only cost a few bucks... I cannot recall now which # size nib the ECO uses,... (my pen is downstairs),... but I'm sure others here do. :D

 

 

- A.C.

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I would personally try a different ink first. One known for being wet as the two inks you mention having tried are on the dry side of the spectrum. Dry inks and extra fine nibs don't always play well together.

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I also had horrible experience with eco EF nib! Mine was scratchy and writed more like fat M than EF. I was too lazy to contact anything and nib was just so bad, that it could never be EF. I bought replacement nib from https://www.fpnibs.com/ XXXF, and I love it! They have eco nibs and affordable regrind service. I'm just happy customer, who returns them every time my TWSBIs need new nib.

 

I don't know what is wrong with eco nibs. I have three TWSBI with EF nibs and it just eco who had bad nib. I'm getting new Eco-T soon, but I think I order custom nib for it straight away. I just don't trust TWSBI eco EF nibs. And I have hear lot of problems with eco nibs here in fpn.

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Hi Antoipod,

 

You basically have two options:

 

Follow the sage advice given above and return it to TWSBI.

 

I already contacted Twsbi but they weren't much of a help so I will try the method show in the video you linked.

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I would personally try a different ink first. One known for being wet as the two inks you mention having tried are on the dry side of the spectrum. Dry inks and extra fine nibs don't always play well together.

I have Noodlers X-Feather, Parker Blue, Parker Blue-Black and Monteverde Emerald Green, with the wettest being the Parker inks. Would you be able to recommend me a wet turquoise ink?

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I already contacted Twsbi but they weren't much of a help so I will try the method show in the video you linked.

Hi Antoipod,

 

That's a shame; I've never needed it as of yet, but I've always heard their service was pretty good.

 

I'd give it a second shot, maybe you just got someone who was having a crummy day.

 

If all else fails, I'd try the Mottishaw method that MikeDoc recommended above first... and if that doesn't pan out, try the Frank Dubeil method in the video that I posted. I wish you the best. :)

 

 

I have Noodlers X-Feather, Parker Blue, Parker Blue-Black and Monteverde Emerald Green, with the wettest being the Parker inks. Would you be able to recommend me a wet turquoise ink?

Hi again, Antoipod,

 

I know this question wasn't directed towards me, per se; however, I would recommend Diamine Asa Blue... it's a deep turquoise, (despite being called "blue"),... and very wet.

 

Be well. :)

 

 

- Anthony

 

 

EDITED for typos.

Edited by ParkerDuofold
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Hi Antoipod, et al,

 

Just to follow-up... When I responded; I was getting tired and forgot to mention one salient point... if you're like me... and you keep your hands well-groomed... the Mottishaw Method may not work for you.

 

I keep my thumbnails trimmed short... and when pulling the shoulders of the nib apart... they'll often pop out freely... accomplishing nothing... you need longer thumbnails to maintain that "grip" under pressure.

 

Either technique is effective and either technique can be as vigorous or gentle as you choose it to be... it all depends on how much pressure or strength you choose to exert. ;)

 

 

- Anthony

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Note - the pushing the pen on the thumbnail method puts you at risk of bending your nib (Speaking from experience) which adds a new problem to your current one. It may result in widening the gap in your nib - which is the desired result - but I would try the Motishaw method first. Some nibs are impossible to grab as Anthony notes - I don't own a TWSBI so I can't speak to what the nibs look like.

 

Good luck!

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Note - the pushing the pen on the thumbnail method puts you at risk of bending your nib (Speaking from experience)...

Hi MikeDoc, et al,

 

I know what you mean... I've had the same experience... that said, I've moistened around 15-20 nibs using the Dubeil method and have only sprung one... a Pilot Metro... so it wasn't much of a loss.

 

But I encourage everyone to carefully experiment with both techniques... in time, you'll discover which technique works best for you... and as you say, sometimes the nib itself will dictate the terms. :D

 

I recommend to explore every avenue and leave no road untravelled... and eventually you'll discover the best course for you.

 

The main thing is patience, gentle pressure and slowly building it up... continually test your progress... and begin using a few cheap Chinese pens... most are dirt cheap and naturally dry... which makes them perfect to practice on. :thumbup:

 

Be well and enjoy life. :)

 

 

- Anthony

 

 

EDITED for typos and to clarify text.

Edited by ParkerDuofold
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Hi Antoipod,

 

You basically have two options:

 

Follow the sage advice given above and return it to TWSBI.

 

OR

 

Try spreading the tines for a few seconds on a hard round surface... I use a 1/2" diameter section of aluminum pipe and that works great for me... although varying diameters will also work... it doesn't have to be 1/2."

 

See it done here:

 

http://youtu.be/Ig5cTFv4lXo

 

But know if you do this and mess it up, you're o-u-t... it'll void the warranty.

 

Any questions? :unsure:

 

 

- Anthony

I tried the method you linked since my nails are very short and it worked well. My Twsbi eco now writes wet enough and stopped skipping, thanks for the help.

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I also had horrible experience with eco EF nib! Mine was scratchy and writed more like fat M than EF. I was too lazy to contact anything and nib was just so bad, that it could never be EF. I bought replacement nib from https://www.fpnibs.com/ XXXF, and I love it! They have eco nibs and affordable regrind service. I'm just happy customer, who returns them every time my TWSBIs need new nib.

 

I don't know what is wrong with eco nibs. I have three TWSBI with EF nibs and it just eco who had bad nib. I'm getting new Eco-T soon, but I think I order custom nib for it straight away. I just don't trust TWSBI eco EF nibs. And I have hear lot of problems with eco nibs here in fpn.

 

I of course went to check this out, as I'm currently contemplating finer nibs and I too have had horrible experience with my ECO EF - which I was hoping would be my EDC. I am instead using my Pilot metro F and started thinking I need EF lately - (waterproof inks tend to double the line size put down & I need fine lines) This might be a better option than the Platinum 3776 UEF just from an ink capacity standpoint (writing about 30+pp daily)

 

Which size nib did you get? There's a section for TWSBI nibs, but I see no XXF :)

To think one can write Truth is but an illusion of words. Now BEAUTY! That's a poem of words & forms!

profile pic credit: Tashi Mannox

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I of course went to check this out, as I'm currently contemplating finer nibs and I too have had horrible experience with my ECO EF - which I was hoping would be my EDC. I am instead using my Pilot metro F and started thinking I need EF lately - (waterproof inks tend to double the line size put down & I need fine lines) This might be a better option than the Platinum 3776 UEF just from an ink capacity standpoint (writing about 30+pp daily)

 

Which size nib did you get? There's a section for TWSBI nibs, but I see no XXF :)

https://www.fpnibs.com/eco/784-10381-ef-tip-spare-nib-for-twsbi.html#/

If you scroll down, there is option to get regrind to XXXF, which is nib size I got.

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I tried the method you linked since my nails are very short and it worked well. My Twsbi eco now writes wet enough and stopped skipping, thanks for the help.

Hi Antoipod,

 

That's great! :thumbup:

 

You're welcome. I'm glad it worked out for you... it usually does the trick for me, too.

 

Be well and enjoy your new Eco. :)

 

 

- Anthony

 

 

Typo.

Edited by ParkerDuofold
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https://www.fpnibs.com/eco/784-10381-ef-tip-spare-nib-for-twsbi.html#/

If you scroll down, there is option to get regrind to XXXF, which is nib size I got.

OOoh! Thanks for that! I just completely decimated my F nib on my Pilot Metro that I had tuned myself to perfection! :yikes: (rolled off the table & landed point down of course!) so now I am REAALLLLY needing an XXF nib

 

 

As further contribution to getting TWSBI ECO nibs to function optimally, I've used Brian Goulet's little teacup technique with great success.

(Turn your mug/tea cup upside down - many of them have a ring of unfinished surface that you can use as a super fine grind 'sanding stone' to clear off any sharp bits on your nib. It doesn't take much and you can do it when the pen has ink in it easily enough - this works best with stoneware or fine bone china)

You simply move your nib across the stone in a circular motion for general smoothing and if there's a spot you can feel then strokes work better.

To think one can write Truth is but an illusion of words. Now BEAUTY! That's a poem of words & forms!

profile pic credit: Tashi Mannox

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...As further contribution to getting TWSBI ECO nibs to function optimally, I've used Brian Goulet's little teacup technique with great success.

(Turn your mug/tea cup upside down - many of them have a ring of unfinished surface that you can use as a super fine grind 'sanding stone' to clear off any sharp bits on your nib. It doesn't take much and you can do it when the pen has ink in it easily enough - this works best with stoneware or fine bone china)

You simply move your nib across the stone in a circular motion for general smoothing and if there's a spot you can feel then strokes work better.

Hi Yarn Yogini,

 

That sounds like a great smoothing technique... thank you! :thumbup:

 

Be well and enjoy life. :)

 

 

- Anthony

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