Jump to content

Deconstructing A Rhodia Pad



Recommended Posts

pepsiplease69

Hello dear friends in FPN-land.

I wanted to discuss a topic related to Rhodia pads. I love the paper for everyday use. The thing I do not like about the regular top-staple bound rhoda's is that there's an awful lot of paper being wasted.

 

The way it's constructed, it's virtually impossible to use the reverse side of each page without tearing the page off the pad entirely. And then you have to figure out where to store the loose sheets.

 

I do understand that in this scenario, a top-spiral bound pad would be better suited, but I wanted to put to good use a staple bound regular rhoda pad which I've already been using.

 

So I decided to pull apart a No 12 Rhodia pad ( 3.3" x 4.7" grid ruled, top staple bound ).

 

I noticed that all pages, front flap, all the way to the cardboard backing, is bound together with one sturdy staple at the center. The orange flap in the back is not stapled but it glues over the open ends of the staple pin.

 

So I pulled off the glued portion and used a staple removal tool to get at the staple pin, once that was removed, I extracted the staple pin from the pad. But then I realized that the pages have a second glue-backed binding so they don't all scatter once the staple is removed.

 

This way the binding is more open and I can use the reverse of each page more easily.

 

Anyone tried this? Do you have any other ideas for increasing the utility?

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 10
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • pepsiplease69

    4

  • ReadyFireAim

    2

  • Inkling13

    1

  • LizEF

    1

Top Posters In This Topic

Rhodia is for ballpoints

 

They lost it

 

Enjoy my money...You won't see anymore of it.

Edited by Nail-Bender
Link to post
Share on other sites

Rhodia is for ballpoints

 

They lost it

 

Enjoy my money...You won't see anymore of it.

I haven't bought any in a while. Did something change?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I have no idea what that means. I bought Rhodia A5 dot pads at Christmas and they're as good as ever.

 

As to the inconvenience of using both sides - have you considered the top spiral bound instead of staple bound?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with you that this way of using a pad is a waste of paper. In my case, I use Rhodia dot pad paper to make my own Midori TN refills. I loose part of the paper when cutting the paper to the Midori size (4 cm would say) but then I can use both sides of the sheets (there are lots of tutorials showing how to do these refills). In my opinion, this is a nice paper to write with fountain pens.

 

Bye!

Link to post
Share on other sites
pepsiplease69

Sorry Im not sure where youre getting these ballpoint-Rhodias. I use my juiciest nibs on Rhodia and never any feathering or bleed through.

 

I purchased mine not more than a few years in the past. So unless they started churning out substandard paper in the past few months ( in which case something did change for the worse, not for the better). Its hard to believe that an established name like Rhodia would mess about with their paper quality willy nilly. I mean they have their own paper factories. Its not like they are bound by what the suppliers give them.

 

As for the idea of using spiral bound. I think thats what I should have originally bought exclusively. Unfortunately I went and bought these staple bound ones indiscriminately because they were so ubiquitous. Id keep buying them wherever I would see them, Barnes and Noble, Container Store, etc. now I have buyers remorse.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't use a steel, flex nib on one without picking up fibers.

 

You should be ok with anything iridium tipped except for a Mottishaw XXF.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats the best part of Rhodia paper, by the time I think about organizing the sheets I realize it isnt worth it and throw it all out.

Link to post
Share on other sites
pepsiplease69

You can't use a steel, flex nib on one without picking up fibers.

 

You should be ok with anything iridium tipped except for a Mottishaw XXF.

Yeah I noticed that too. Flex or XF nibs wreak havoc with the fibers of the paper.

 

Realistically though, almost 98% of what I write with is stubs and italics. Rhodia is the paper of choice for my needs ( thats if I cant get Tomoe).

Link to post
Share on other sites
pepsiplease69

I agree with you that this way of using a pad is a waste of paper. In my case, I use Rhodia dot pad paper to make my own Midori TN refills. I loose part of the paper when cutting the paper to the Midori size (4 cm would say) but then I can use both sides of the sheets (there are lots of tutorials showing how to do these refills). In my opinion, this is a nice paper to write with fountain pens.

 

Bye!

I like the idea of converting Rhodia pads to TN notebooks. Im going to look for tutorials on that.

 

This will find a good purpose for all the complementary reels of dental floss my dentist keeps giving me every visit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used the Rhodia A5 size top spiral bound with a Pilot broad steel stub nib with no issues. For me the top spiral is the lesser of evils.

CFTPM

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now







×
×
  • Create New...