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What Waterman Pens Do You Own? 2018 + 19 + 20 + 21


RMN

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I recently found my grail pen, a vintage Waterman 552-1/2 — it is actually my only Waterman (though I would enjoy getting a vintage Ripple).  Good thing it took awhile because it gave me time to save for it, LOL! 

Edited by Turquoise88
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Congrats on your 552 1/2 :).  ripple pens are a lot easier to find than a 552 1/2 and would cost only a fraction of the price.

 

Congrats again, Upload some pics of your new pen :).

 

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On 12/10/2020 at 11:01 AM, SamChevre said:

This is my first fountain pen--I believe it's a Waterman Taperite Crusader.  I got it in a random box of stuff and replaced the sac (my first pen repair.)

 

20201210_115758.thumb.jpg.e4b397d7ce4d61ebe3233885aa0d3c02.jpg20201028_122524.thumb.jpg.e469914d7516319cb642fe40cc5f6a79.jpg20201028_122002.thumb.jpg.80a824599b9f9c1905af35dd70234fbd.jpg

Howdy,

How did you know what size replacement sac to buy?

Did you use shellac to seal sac to section?

 

Can silicone grease be used instead of shellac to seal a replacement sac to section?

 

thx!

  • Waterman Ideal Exclusive Black Lacquer 18K nib fountain pen.
  • Waterman Man 200 Rhapsody Fiber Tip Mineral Green rollerball.
  • Set: '72 Parker 75 Flighter Deluxe GT Fountain  Pen + '78 Parker 180 Flighter CT Floating Ball / Fiber Tip. 
  • Sheaffer Lifetime Ring Cap, Sheaffer 2d & 3d Gen Pens.
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1 hour ago, loulu10 said:

Howdy,

How did you know what size replacement sac to buy?

Did you use shellac to seal sac to section?

 

Can silicone grease be used instead of shellac to seal a replacement sac to section?

 

thx!

 

To identify the size, I used the sac size guide on Richard Binder's site (linked from the Repair Q&A forum)
https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/219105-fountain-pen-sac-size-guide-for-repairers/

I used shellac to attach the sac--I got a small bottle from David Nishimura (Vintage Pens).

 

I do not think silicone grease would work in this application, but the Repair Forum has many people with much more experience than I.

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22 hours ago, SamChevre said:

 

To identify the size, I used the sac size guide on Richard Binder's site (linked from the Repair Q&A forum)
https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/219105-fountain-pen-sac-size-guide-for-repairers/

I used shellac to attach the sac--I got a small bottle from David Nishimura (Vintage Pens).

 

I do not think silicone grease would work in this application, but the Repair Forum has many people with much more experience than I.

 

23 hours ago, loulu10 said:

Howdy,

How did you know what size replacement sac to buy?

Did you use shellac to seal sac to section?

 

Can silicone grease be used instead of shellac to seal a replacement sac to section?

 

thx!

Many thanks for the tips!

  • Waterman Ideal Exclusive Black Lacquer 18K nib fountain pen.
  • Waterman Man 200 Rhapsody Fiber Tip Mineral Green rollerball.
  • Set: '72 Parker 75 Flighter Deluxe GT Fountain  Pen + '78 Parker 180 Flighter CT Floating Ball / Fiber Tip. 
  • Sheaffer Lifetime Ring Cap, Sheaffer 2d & 3d Gen Pens.
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Recently ended up getting 2 vintage waterman 22 pens (narrow feed, 2 line pre-globe imprint), one Aiken Lambert pen and 4  parts pens with missing or broken caps (both 22 and 24, same narrow feed). I'm hoping to get some caps made for them to complete them. One of them has a start nib. Only the second so far for me.

 

IMG_20210104_170239.jpg.43cb1aad3536fc155db8a3c73efd1c29.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Good news!

 

I replaced my antique sac using supplies I bought from Anderson Pens. Took 7 long days for supplies to arrive. (I'm used to Amazon prime fast 2-day shipping).

 

It was easy to do after watching a couple of youtube videos.

 

Instead of blowing into the barrel to fill, I just squeezed the new sac a few times to fill. It WAS messy but I wore gloves - and great fun. I filled it with my own mix of 2 green inks (Thornton's Green and Diamine shimmer 'Emerald Forest' - not shaken) and it writes great.

 

After more research, seems like me pen is a cheap Scripto 'blow' pneumatic  filler pen. Must be rare because I cannot find any pens like it anywhere. I can see why there are none to find - filling it is not as easy as using a cartridge or converter or eyedropper or lever fill.

 

Until I replaced the sac, I was using it as a dip pen....

 

Thanks again for the sac repair info.

  • Waterman Ideal Exclusive Black Lacquer 18K nib fountain pen.
  • Waterman Man 200 Rhapsody Fiber Tip Mineral Green rollerball.
  • Set: '72 Parker 75 Flighter Deluxe GT Fountain  Pen + '78 Parker 180 Flighter CT Floating Ball / Fiber Tip. 
  • Sheaffer Lifetime Ring Cap, Sheaffer 2d & 3d Gen Pens.
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Long ago I posted that I had a number of Watermans; but I traded some of those that I never used (Hundred Year pens) for something more interesting.  So now my Waterman family reads thus: 

 

94 in blue and white ripple;

54 in red ripple;

55 in cardinal red;

56 in red ripple and

58 in black hard rubber...

 

All having flexible nibs (of course!)

 

I see that there is a thread now about how some people find Waterman pens becoming boring.  That's rather sad, when I compare with these lovely, interesting writing instruments that I list above!

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  • 1 month later...

Hello,

All my Waterman pens are modern. I have a couple of Carène; à deluxe white and a red. I have a “Day and Night Exception”, and a Hemisphere LE in Sapphire Blue.

the Carène are my favorites!

 

Nicole

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  • 3 weeks later...
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I love the 20’s and earlier Watermans, such a delight to use. I picked up this one with a broken cracked nib and no cap, all the more fun to use after soldering the nib and making a cap ( by hand with card stock and loctite 480) lots of fun and light as a feather. The barrel actually may be the most pristine of my bhr pens.

BFFE1D16-AD0C-4F65-963B-C625BFF7AEDE.jpeg

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BE9F36BE-D534-4CC5-98CB-515E6615ACD0.jpeg

D8720FFC-DD05-4463-B21C-49CC736EA88F.jpeg

Regards, Glen

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Sorry it’s a 12 from around 1920 the box is a reproduction I made awhile back to carry Waterman pens to work etc 

Regards, Glen

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There are some wonderful pens illustrated in this thread, especially the vintage ones. The HR Waterman pens have been my favorites to have and despite the frequency of finding a ideal 2 nib it still is my favorite of all so enjoyable to write with if you like pointed pen calligraphy.  I like Conklin Toledo 2 nibs and Wahl 2 and others but I still come back to the ideal 2. 

This little set was a gift from my daughter and although I haven’t bought any 40’s Waterman pens in this style I find them pretty and nice to use. Oddly they came in a Parker case..

50D6DA62-A86D-45A2-AC9F-1C658B820291.jpeg

Regards, Glen

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Not so odd. Easy access to many goods is a commodity of today. Back in the day you would only have access to a more reduced set and didn't care that much for matching brands, colors, etc... you would take what you found. So, if you had a pen and wanted a case, you'd go to the shop and pick the one you liked the most, without regards for matching pen and case brand.

 

I still remember the times when branding was not only secondary, but also often a matter of bad taste basting of. In that branding tried to be as discrete as possible, not a major part of any good as it is now. Most modern clothing, for instance, would have been considered in bad taste. But then, those were still the times of custom tailors and show makers. Branding only got in the way. Customized goods gave you status, branded goods marked you as a user of for-the-mass mass-produced items. Unless they were clearly of such a high quality that it obscured any branding.

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