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Platinum #3776 Century Uef Dry?



mavinster

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I got a fountain pen for Christmas :D

It's a Platinum #3776 Century with an ultra-extra-fine nib. I normally write with a Pilot Penmanship (or that nib in another pen) which is an Extra Fine, so I was expecting it to be finer than that. I was surprised to find, though, that the Platinum seems to be very dry, and that the black ink I'm using looks more like grey - actually it looks more like pencil, to me. I can make more ink come out, without really noticeably affecting the line width, but only if I apply quite a bit of pressure - I normally write quite lightly. I've flushed the pen through with water (I originally inked it as soon as I took it out of the box, but then thought I should have a go at flushing it!) but that hasn't made any difference. I've tried the pen with Noodler's Black in the converter, and with a standard Platinum black ink cartridge.

 

I was wondering if this is normal for this pen, or not? This is my first pen of this level of fineness, so I don't know if I have unrealistic expectations or not!

 

I've attached a photo of the 3776 alongside the Penmanship for comparison. To be honest, the line with the 3776 is light enough that I have some trouble reading my writing, as I found when I wrote a page with it!

 

post-125263-0-35671900-1514259407_thumb.jpg

 

I'd be greatly appreciative if anyone can give me some advice about if this is normal, and if there is anything I can do make it wetter.

 

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You should normally use both water and dish soap to flush it out because water on it's own is not going to remove oils I'm afraid. Once you've done that, do this:

1) draw up ink into the converter until full

2) screw converter back down to release the ink back into the ink bottle

3) repeat 5 times until you have a full converter.

 

 

Enjoy your new 3776.

Edited by Bluey
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How much dish soap (I'm thinking that that's something like Fairy Liquid?) should I use? I don't want anything to be left in - and I've only ever flushed with plain water before!

Thank you so much!

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A drop or 2 of Fairy Liquid mixed in an old cup of warm or tepid tap water will do.

 

Fill the converter with the mix, and then plop the nib section in the cup. Leave for around 5 or 6 hours, or overnight. Then empty converter of the mix and screw up and down a few times in some clean water, then drain off. Then rinse the nib section using clean water

 

Voila.

Edited by Bluey
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That does seem to have helped - I think perhaps as I write with it more, it may get even better :)

 

I don't tend to leave pens soaking overnight when new (I'm impatient)- I run some soap water through it (with a bulb syringe if CC or by working the piston mechanism) and follow with clear water, then suck the excess water out with a paper towel, ink and go.

 

I do find pens get wetter after a week or so of use.

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Thank you, Bluey and KellyMcJ - I soaked it in the soapy water for a few hours, and have reinked it now. It's noticeably darker (and smoother to write with), much more pleasant to use, and I suspect it will get better still with use.

 

Thank you very much for your advice. I was a bit nervous about the pen - this is the most expensive pen I've ever owned, and if I broke it, I could not replace it!

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its good to know the problem solved, my experience though, Platinum tend to require the pen be used a while to get run in , that happens with my vintage Platinum as well as new ones ... running flush over and over again kind of speed up the process

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btw I forgot to explain to the OP(in my first post in this thread) the meaning of doing the following, but it's to saturate the feed, which is useful to do immediately after flushing the pen. Sometimes with some drier and fine pens the feeds don't become fully saturated until after you've written for a while, so this technique merely speeds up the process. If you don't do this with such pens you may find that the ink starts off very watery and light, and becomes darker later on:

 

1) draw up ink into the converter until full

2) screw converter back down to release the ink back into the ink bottle

3) repeat 5 times until you have a full converter.

 

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btw I forgot to explain to the OP(in my first post in this thread) the meaning of doing the following, but it's to saturate the feed, which is useful to do immediately after flushing the pen. Sometimes with some drier and fine pens the feeds don't become fully saturated until after you've written for a while, so this technique merely speeds up the process. If you don't do this with such pens you may find that the ink starts off very watery and light, and becomes darker later on:

 

 

That makes sense!!!! I am too impatient so I let that process happen in the process of writing, although I might do better to do it ahead of time.

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If you just think the tines are too tight, the nib and feed pull straight out, place the nib wings-down on a hard surface and press down gently but firmly a bit right on the breather hole. it should open the tines up a bit.

Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)

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Bluey, that's really good advice.

 

My ha'porth:

My UEF and EF 3776s also tend to write dry, and I tend to be choosy about the inks I use with them - something good and wet. I find the ink choice with them is much more critical than with other pens and other nibs. My Pilot Royal Blue (vintage, found for 15 baht in a shop in Bangkok's Chinatown) makes them cranky and scratchy, Waterman blue makes them work the way they ought to. It's worth checking the 'wet/dry inks' threads in the inky forum and picking accordingly.

Too many pens, too little time!

http://fountainpenlove.blogspot.fr/

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I would NOT try pulling the nib out and messing around with it. It's too easy to make it useless.

 

This is a problem that often comes up with regards to Japanese fine (and EF and UEF) nibs. Because part of their fineness comes from their dryness. Use a (very) wet ink in these pens. And yes, the advice about flushing with dish detergent does sound ridiculous, but it works. This worked with my Pilot Elite 95S (with extra fine nib). Note that the nib will still be very dry, but at least will become usable. :)

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