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Conid Materials?


Inkling13

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I was wondering what others might have to say, regarding the materials for Conid's pens. I am curious, as to the stability of the materials to environmental/time/and everyday bumps and drops. I have had a Pilot 832, currently on a trip to Pilot after the body/section joint sustained a fall, The crack apparently is not all that uncommon for this model, as I have seen several mentions of this on FPN and Reddit. It cracks just in the right place, to cause catastrophic failure of the pen, necessitating repair.

Now my concern with Conid is a similar in construction, is that the danger of a crack from a slight drop would be catastrophic as well. Does anyone have any thoughts on Acrylic vs Delrin vs ebonite in terms of risk of crack?

 

Also, in terms of longevity, what material would be most stable over time? I am aware of the oxidation of ebonite, and am concerned it may prove to be a concern, but likely not in my lifetime.

Thanks

-I

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If you're looking for that type of durability maybe consider a solid metal pen. I think there's a youtube video of someone driving a car over a Karas Kustom Ink after throwing it around a parking lot – I think Goulet made the video but I can't find it.

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I have some machined pens, titanium, steel, etc, but I am interested in a Conid pen. It seems that everyone runs their pens either on premade Bock or JoWo nibs, from Edison pens to other kitless makers out there. What I am interested in, is the purported robustness of the fill mechanism, the volume, and mechanical finesse that goes behind its creation. I am wondering what would be a fair match for the titanium hardware of the pen. Ebonite I know will oxidize, and is more sensitive to say water submersion. I just would like some input comparing it to say the Delrin or acrylic used.

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If I want an ultra durable pen,I get an opaque acrylic eyedropper. There's nothing to break in the filling system and the material is VERY durable and can be polished to remove light scratches. Some custom builders will maintain your pen for very little money for the life of the pen, too.

"Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination."

Oscar Wilde

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Now my concern with Conid is a similar in construction, is that the danger of a crack from a slight drop would be catastrophic as well.

 

Hello there - this is exactly why Conid's design approach using components and parts that are easier to replace, makes the purchase a sound decision. Even if you wind up damaging the cap or body on a Conid, the parts can often be changed out by yourself. How many great writers can you say that about :)

 

Examples:

 

http://conidblog.com/how-to-2/

 

http://conidblog.com/how-to-unscrew-a-handnut-from-a-kingsize/

Best regards,
Steve Surfaro
Fountain Pen Fun
Cities of the world (please visit my Facebook page for more albums)
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Hello there - this is exactly why Conid's design approach using components and parts that are easier to replace, makes the purchase a sound decision. Even if you wind up damaging the cap or body on a Conid, the parts can often be changed out by yourself. How many great writers can you say that about :)

 

Examples:

 

http://conidblog.com/how-to-2/

 

http://conidblog.com/how-to-unscrew-a-handnut-from-a-kingsize/

Has anyone had to do something like this? How hard is it to get replacement parts? I wouldn't want to find out while easily serviceable, the parts are rarer than hens teeth. I could have replaced the barrel on my Pilot Custom 823, but alas, no parts. Especially if one is shelling out Montblanc tier prices for a pen, I'd rather not end up with a Montblanc level servicing ability.

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Inkling, you could address your material durability question to Francis Goosens at CONID, or perhaps to his FPN username, which is fountainbel.

Reviews and articles on Fountain Pen Network

 

CHINA, JAPAN, AND INDIA

Hua Hong Blue Belter | Penbbs 456 | Stationery | ASA Nauka in Dartmoor and Ebonite | ASA Azaadi | ASA Bheeshma | ASA Halwa | Ranga Model 8 and 8b | Ranga Emperor

ITALY AND THE UK

FILCAO Roxi | FILCAO Atlantica | Italix Churchman's Prescriptor

USA, INK, AND EXPERIMENTS

Bexley Prometheus | Route 54 Motor Oil | Black Swan in Icelandic Minty Bathwater | Robert Oster Aqua | Diamine Emerald Green | Mr. Pen Radiant Blue | Three Oysters Giwa | Flex Nib Modifications | Rollstoppers

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Hi inkling13 !

I'm a mechanical design engineer and long time fountain pen user and collector,
Repairing some of my fountain pens I was regularly confronted with design flows, excessive wear and maintenance unfriendliness.
When I designed the Buklfiller pen range I logically took these experiences in account.
Aiming for a perfect pen which would last a lifetime , I designed the pen without compromises towards materials, durability and maintenance friendliness.
All parts are machined from solid barstock with extremely precise tolerances, so all parts are fully exchangeable.
Only stress free "cast" acrylic material is used for all transparent parts, avoiding any risks for stress related cracking , an inherent risk when using injection mould parts.
Conid logically keeps a stock of all spare parts, so in case something would occur, you can surely count on Conid !
Francis
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Hi inkling13 !

I'm a mechanical design engineer and long time fountain pen user and collector,

Repairing some of my fountain pens I was regularly confronted with design flows, excessive wear and maintenance unfriendliness.

When I designed the Buklfiller pen range I logically took these experiences in account.

Aiming for a perfect pen which would last a lifetime , I designed the pen without compromises towards materials, durability and maintenance friendliness.

All parts are machined from solid barstock with extremely precise tolerances, so all parts are fully exchangeable.

Only stress free "cast" acrylic material is used for all transparent parts, avoiding any risks for stress related cracking , an inherent risk when using injection mould parts.

Conid logically keeps a stock of all spare parts, so in case something would occur, you can surely count on Conid !

Francis

Would there be an option to have ebonite replaced with Delrin?
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Kingsized Streamline version, but Id be waiting for the Caiso integration. My only reason is that I worry about ebonite being more brittle compared to Delrin.

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Kingsized Streamline version, but Id be waiting for the Caiso integration. My only reason is that I worry about ebonite being more brittle compared to Delrin.

 

Hi Inkling13

Delrin is tougher, but not as has hard as ebonite.

Conid uses only high quality ebonite and - as far as I know - they never had to replace an ebonite part. The Bulkfiller design being very sturdy build I would not worry !

I d'ont know if Conid will ever produce the standard or CAISO Kingsize in delrin* (* ISO material name :"POM°)

Although the recently launched "gentleman's pen" S.E features a delrin cap and body!

See : https://www.gentlemanspen.com

Hope this helps,

Francis

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Thank you Francis. What is your experience with the acrylic vs ebonite? Which is tougher? I really appreciate your input.

Also, would you know if Conid will be attending the 2018 Chicago pen show?

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Thank you Francis. What is your experience with the acrylic vs ebonite? Which is tougher? I really appreciate your input.

Also, would you know if Conid will be attending the 2018 Chicago pen show?

 

Compared to ebonite acrylic is more brittle.

When falling down on a tile floor from desk level, ebonite will withstand the fall without problems, while acrylic could possibly crack due to the inertia reaction forces.

The Buklfiller design being sturdy this happens however very exceptional.

Francis

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If you fear breaking your pen so much..........a shirt pocket sewed narrower to a pen pocket will prevent pens falling out ....of course if you stick them in your pants pockets....buy a Kaweco. For some odd reason, they even make Kaweco in metal. :yikes:

Really! The plastic ones are quite stable enough.

 

Francis has stated they have spare parts.....having 100% choice of materials with out a bookkeeper frowning over his shoulder chose Ebonite.

In reference to P. T. Barnum; to advise for free is foolish, ........busybodies are ill liked by both factions.

 

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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