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New Pilot Ch 92, Ink Dried In The Barrel & Top Of The Piston Sac


YordleLife
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Good Day FPN,

 

I'm finally back to the Fountain Pen club since my first encounter with fountain pens in Middle School. I really like the appearance of demonstrator fountain pens and so I got myself a Pilot CH 92 for the holiday.

 

That said, I inked up my new arrived pen, without flush with water, with Diamine Majestic Purple. Dry ink formed on Day 2, but I've been using my pen everyday! I'm not sure how good my phone camera picks up the dried ink sitting on top of the piston sac (is that how you call it?)

 

I'm worry a simple flush of water will not remove this dried ink and then it will take-up space for already a small barrel ink capacity. What happens if I change color with other brands of ink? Would other ink reacts to the dried ink inside the barrel? How should I approach this issue?

 

I thought ink at this caliber, from Diamine, should be free of issues like this or is it normal? Considering the winter here rarely gets below 50F. I don't see any other way to explain ink dried up inside the barrel..

 

All helps are appreciated!

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Edited by YordleLife
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unable to identify the dried ink in the pics. Can you circle or mark the area that you think is the dried ink?

 

if you are worried, dump the ink in the pen, and fill & expel normal temperature tap water in the pen. Do this several times till the water runs clear. Then fill it with another ink you feel comfortable with.

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unable to identify the dried ink in the pics. Can you circle or mark the area that you think is the dried ink?

 

if you are worried, dump the ink in the pen, and fill & expel normal temperature tap water in the pen. Do this several times till the water runs clear. Then fill it with another ink you feel comfortable with.

Yes! I outlined the dried ink in new pics. I will need another refill in about 2~3 days with the same ink. Should I flush the pen then or wait until I switch to other color? I'm not a clean-freak per se, but I would hate to see dried ink eating up space for an already small ink capacity barrel...Build-in piston filling system is cool and all that, after this lesson I would see why I might prefer a piston-converter pen.

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ok, now i see it.

 

it can be anything, look up SITB.

 

i suggest you dump this fill of ink. Flush the pen thoroughly by filling pen with clean normal room temperature water. See if the buildup has gone away after flushing.

 

try some standard ink like Quink blue or Pelikan 4001 or one of several others.

In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

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look up SITB.

 

i suggest you dump this fill of ink.

Not going to give up on a new $15 bottle ink just for this one little short-coming. :P Now, what got me thinking is the barrel should be air tight sealed AND with the piston pushing out all the air before the fill should eliminate any oxygen inside the barrel after fill. This means there should be no air interacting with ink inside the barrel, and thus ink is intact.

 

However, I didn't fully submerge my nib when filling the pen. That might have gotten air inside the barrel...Well, Pilot CH 92 by no means expensive, not cheap either, at least I figured out I would prefer piston converter pen from now on if I'm buying any pens that are expensive! I would be greatly distress if I put this ink in a much more expensive pen.

 

Good thing I enjoy clear demonstrator pen, which is my ink testing pen before filling any fancy pen if I ever buy one :)

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Air in the barrel won't cause that. Every fountain pen has air in the ink reservoir.

 

Try a thorough flushing, as Hari said, until the goop is gone. Then try a fill of a different ink.

fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
-- John Purdue (1863)

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Now, what got me thinking is the barrel should be air tight sealed AND with the piston pushing out all the air before the fill should eliminate any oxygen inside the barrel after fill. This means there should be no air interacting with ink inside the barrel, and thus ink is intact.

 

 

No, this isn't even remotely true. Even if you get every bit of air out of the reservoir while filling, air would get in anyways because a fountain pen functions through a controlled interchange of air and ink. If there were a vacuum, the pen wouldn't work at all.

 

I'll echo the other comments - dump the ink, give the pen a thorough rinse and clean (first with water with a touch of dish soap, then just water) and try again.

Edited by jekostas
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No, this isn't even remotely true. Even if you get every bit of air out of the reservoir while filling, air would get in anyways because a fountain pen functions through a controlled interchange of air and ink. If there were a vacuum, the pen wouldn't work at all.

 

I'll echo the other comments - dump the ink, give the pen a thorough rinse and clean (first with water with a touch of dish soap, then just water) and try again.

 

 

Air in the barrel won't cause that. Every fountain pen has air in the ink reservoir.

 

Try a thorough flushing, as Hari said, until the goop is gone. Then try a fill of a different ink.

I used up every last drop of ink in the barrel and then flushed with warm water, which solved everything...The light purple stain seems to washed-off the ink window too! The only down side is ink dried up in the barrel (I wanna see if this happens again with second fill, and now I find out a single fill lasts me ~10 days). 10 days is not that long to make ink dry up inside the barrel? I hate to lose ink that way because I paid for it and I DEMAND to use every last drop!!

 

Sorry, but I am going to test the claim that so many fountain pen users say "FP is a great long-term investment because the lower overall cost compare to buying non-reusable pens" My main work-horse pen in school is Uni-ball vision rollerball pens (0.7mm). Disregard the cost of my Pilot CH 92, $15/bottle 80mL Diamine ink would last me about 22 months. I got this number from knowing the ink capacity of Pilot CH 92 is 1.2mL, and so a 80mL bottle ink gives me about 66.67 times refill. Then 10 days per refill gives me 666.7 days or 22 months.

 

On the other side, $15 can get me 13.37 Uniball rollerball pens, round it down to 13, and I still don't recall I used up 13 Uniball rollerball pens in a time-span of 2 years! I am going to retest my theory again using only a brand new Uniball rollerball, and see how long it's going to last.

 

​To make my test more credible or less bias, I'm going to record the total number of hours using such pen while studying. And also the total number of A4 size papers I filled.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Ink will not "dry up" in a barrel of fountain pen as far as certain amount of ink still remain in the barrel. I believe the humidity inside the barrel will be nearly 100%.

 

It's not a "dried up" ink but a "clogged" ink.

According to my limited experience, Diamine inks are reliable and stable.

I've never experienced clogging with them.

 

As you mentioned, you didn't flush the pen before use, some unknown residue in the barrel may have reacted to the ink and caused clogging, I suppose.

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