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Waterman 100 Nib/feed Separated From Section


jmccarty3
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This morning I uncapped my Waterman Le Man 100 Opéra. The nib/feed assembly stayed in the cap, separated from the section. I took everything apart--the nib/feed can be inserted into the section, but it remains loose. There are no threads to screw the nib into the section. There were no loose parts visible when I took the pen apart, like a gasket or O-ring. Anyone have an idea what has happened?

 

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Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

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Unless it has broken off that should screw back into the end of the section. You can see screw threads right at the end of the gold plated band.

 

They aren't normally loose so hopefully it won't come unscrewed again.

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Actually, there are no thread on the nib assembly or the section, although in the photo it may appear so, and the nib assembly does not screw in. Is it possible that the nib assembly was held in place with some sort of adhesive like shellac? The assembly fits right in, but just turns and turns in the section without anything catching on it.

Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

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I believe the threaded back end of the plastic nib carrier, which should be where the tail of the feed shows in your photo, has snapped off and is still screwed in, down in the brass "inner section".

 

Here are some photos:

 

https://pennibink.weebly.com/3--change-yourself-the-nib-of-a-man--changez-vous-mecircme-la-plume-dun-man.html

fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
-- John Purdue (1863)

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I've disassembled my Opera, and can verify that Tweel is correct. The photos show that the nib assembly has a threaded tail that screws into the section. This appears to be true of all LeMan 100s, including our Operas and the Harlequin.

I'd be tempted to apply, very sparingly, some JBWeld to the broken area of the nib assembly, making sure that no excess is present to bond the threaded part even more strongly to the inside of the section, let it set, and hope that you can unsrcrew it. I'd also give a try to gently applying a thread tapper to the inside of this broken threaded part, and attempting gently to unscrew it, in hopes that it may be cemented to the nib section again.

But the odds are long. I think you need a new section and nib assembly.

post-95794-0-94518300-1511738195_thumb.jpg

post-95794-0-45434900-1511738223_thumb.jpg

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You're probably right. This problem is above my pay grade. I have an email in to Ron Zorn to see if he can replace the parts. I do hope to save the nib, though.

Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

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The broken part can probably be extracted from the section, and the nib and feed will pull out of their current housing and can be transferred to a new one.

fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
-- John Purdue (1863)

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The broken part can probably be extracted from the section, and the nib and feed will pull out of their current housing and can be transferred to a new one.

 

That would be wonderful, but Ron says he doesn't have the parts. I emailed him back and told him I have a spare Le Man 100 that we could cannibalize for its feed (and section, if needed), but haven't heard back from him. If he doesn't respond, does anyone have any other ideas about who might attempt this? I am anxious to save this wonderful fine nib.

Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

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I haven't tried to extract the broken part. I'm afraid I would get glue all over everything, since it's down fairly deep within the section. Still haven't heard back from Ron about whether he's willing to do the repair if I supply the parts, so I'm open to suggestions about others who might be good at this.

Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

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You need to find a way to remove the broken off piece. I'm not sure what is the best way. Maybe an eraser on the top of a pencil? Does that fit inside?

 

If you can get it out then you will be able to screw in the spare that you have.

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Any cementing or solvent-welding of the broken point housing would be done after the feed is pulled out of it, and after the broken piece is unscrewed and removed from the interior of the section (that might take some heating of the brass; I think Waterman used a little sealer on the threads). After it's cured and any necessary cleanup of the joint is done, the nib and feed would be reinserted into the housing, and the housing screwed back in to the section.

 

It may be that the broken housing can't be reliably repaired, or the threaded part can't be extracted from the section without tearing it up, and then you'll need a donor part. I think, from what I can see, that the point housing is the only donor part that you'd need. You don't necessarily need to sacrifice your other pen for it, it may be available as a part from someone who has already torn down a broken pen for parts. Try contacting FPN member Dutchpen to see if he has one on hand (one with a gold ring, or that he could replate with gold).

 

I'm sorry I can't immediately recommend a repairer. A number of people should be able to do it if they see the problem (try e-mailing them a link to this thread) and have the part available.

fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
-- John Purdue (1863)

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Thanks for all the replies. The pencil eraser trick was a good idea, but didn't work. As I suspected, the broken part that is screwed into the section is pretty well stuck (which probably is why it broke in the first place).

 

Having done business with Dutchpen before, I tried to contact him, but have had no reply. Also have not heard back from Ron Zorn about whether he is willing to use my supplied spare parts to repair the pen.

 

I will try to contact them again.

Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

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Update: Dutchpen didn't have what I needed, but another member here put me in touch with a member from France who has the parts. I'm ordering an extra feed just for insurance.

Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I received the feed/section assembly from France today, along with a spare feed, but still don't have anyone to install the old nib. I'll try one more time to communicate with Ron Zorn about doing this, but he appears not to want to do business with me. Any other suggestions are welcome.

Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

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I received the feed/section assembly from France today, along with a spare feed, but still don't have anyone to install the old nib. I'll try one more time to communicate with Ron Zorn about doing this, but he appears not to want to do business with me. Any other suggestions are welcome.

Why not attempt a DIY transplant? The nib and feed will pull out of the broken sleeve.

In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

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I just don't trust myself to do it. I know it's easy. I can always take it to the next show I go to and have someone do it there.

Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

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... I can always take it to the next show I go to and have someone do it there.

I think that will be best when you are not comfortable doing it yourself.

In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

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  • 9 months later...
  • 7 months later...

The same recently happened to me. I am now trying to remove the nib/feed from the (broken rest of) section, but it is stucked. Soaking did not help, it did not come out even with quite a bit of force (but not too much, I am worried about eventual damaging the feed).
Any ideas?

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