Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network Messages

Back Online Again!

Dearest Members and Visitors of the Fountain Pen Nuthouse,

NOTE: Your new login user name now is your old Display Name, alternative login option is your email address!

For more details, please check FPN News, here: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/356406-finally-back-online-again/?tab=comments#comment-4371649

Warm regards, The FPN Admin Team

Rate Topic 0

Recommended Posts

I may be missing the point here by a mile, so apologies if I've misunderstood - might the John Brindle M.T. list give you some of the information you you want?? Cob and greenie will perhaps know more of what I'm saying, and can confirm or rubbish my suggestion - I attached a link for this list very recently, but not sure now which thread that was. If that is of interest we can locate it again - if not ignore me. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems there are a whole load of SM numbers not listed, or I’ve missed them, or their numbers correspond to the L patterns and I’ve missed that description somewhere... for example, the L205/59 is described as “Italian pattern” and mine was described to me as “Italian Marble”, but the L is leverless, and mine has a lever.

Hi, I'm Mat


:)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Haha! Just having typed that, I was struck with inspiration! Its on the elusive Page 3...! Those pages arent on the drop-down menu.

 

So thats the listing, but I was also wondering why we have 205, or 59 for that matter!

Edited by MercianScribe

Hi, I'm Mat


:)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no list of numbers but I can offer some information from experience which is certainly not complete.

 

As far as am aware the series began with SM1 & 2 (the numbers of course being nib size. These were quite long pens, the SM2 having longitudinal chasing which is often worn away. The material was either 60, black Celluloid or 61 - Mabie Todds code for hard rubber, and the Minors I have seen with this code were Mottled m- i.e. Red hard rubber called by some people "woodgrain" which it isn't. The model number was stamped on the end of the barrel. If fitted the clips were step types; the SM1 having chrome and the SM2 having gold plated clips./ I have seen some of the early SM2s with a cap band but cannot remember if these had a different number which they should have had. These early pens had a handsome shape with a barrel that narrowed down towards the section.

 

There were some lovely materials available. Here's a SM2/58 in "Marine Bronze"

 

fpn_1510916813__1.jpg

 

And a SM1/57 (Blue-bronze)

 

fpn_1510917018__1.jpg

 

The range changed when the shorter models were introduced. The base numbering (according to nib size) was SM100/ or SM200/. There were no hard rubber versions. The /60s were in attractive chased black Celluloid; this seems to have been very successful as there are many about. These pens were supplied with chrome-plated inserted clips. There was a SM205/ this had a single cap band in gold plate with clip to match and I think, but am not certain, a SM206/ the same but in chrome. The smaller SM100s were not offered with cap bands.

 

As mentioned above there was a great range of delightful materials: I do not know if all were employed in the SM range, certainly as mentioned above there was 59 Italian Marble and I have right now a handsome SM205/63 (Russet & Green).

 

fpn_1510916612__1.jpg

 

Then of course there were the famous snakeskin and lizard skin materials number being mostly in the 80s. here's one a SM205/85, my camera has not recorded the colour correctly it is supposed to be ruby snakeskin in fact.

 

fpn_1510917260__1.jpg

 

I am sure I am not alone in thinking that Mabie Todd produced some of the finest and most handsome pens in their heyday in the 1930s.

 

Cob

Edited by Cob

fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like the SM1s and SM2s for their shape, step type clips and the lovely material and patterns. The #1 and #2 nibs I have seen on these were all soft to super flex.

 

Right now I have a SM1/57 inked. The nib on this one is super flex.

Khan M. Ilyas

Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like the SM1s and SM2s for their shape, step type clips and the lovely material and patterns. The #1 and #2 nibs I have seen on these were all soft to super flex.

 

Right now I have a SM1/57 inked. The nib on this one is super flex.

Yes I should have added that I have found many of the nibs fitted to SM models very good indeed in flex terms. I have also had some lovely flex obliques; in particular I remember a lovely SM1/60 I wish I still had!

 

Cob

Edited by Cob

fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg


Link to post
Share on other sites

SM 100 has a #1 nib, no band

SM 200 is #2 nib, bandless

SM 205 is #2 nib, with a single narrow band

 

The color codes are a whole different list! My personal list is cobbled together.

 

 

A very long thread all about this numbering question

 

 

For the group - is there a posted list someone can link to??? Is there a public version of the comprehensive Hull list?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...