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Enjoying Montblanc Pens — Broad, Oblique, Extra Fine, Le & Bespoke



Tom Kellie

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~ zaddick:

 

Too cool, my friend.

Great Montblanc action shots.

The classic Montblanc vs Pelikan face-off.

Love both of these!

Tom K.

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Meisterstück Biloba Collection.

Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword, obviously never encountered automatic weapons." – General D. MacArthur

 

 

“Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.” W. Churchill

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georges zaslavsky

Tom -

 

But are they all the same model of pen?

 

-Yee

Yes they are all 149s

Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

 

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fpn_1510464371__ginkgo_biloba_pen.jpg

Tom. Great sketch. You may have just planted the seed in Hamburg for a future Montblanc special edition pen and ink! :D

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https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/258970-show-off-your-non-german-mbs/page-5 Post #82



fpn_1510500704__spain_44.png




~ The above confirms what a long-time friend told me about a visit to ‘Pen Cluster’ in Tokyo's Ginza.



He saw and handled a number of vintage Montblanc pens in superb condition, including an assortment of Montblancs made in Barcelona, Spain.



What especially caught my attention was his comment that several Montblanc pens over fifty years old had remarkable flex.



After reading that, I gave it no more thought until reading tonight the description by ivyman of his EF 44 flexing up to BBB (!!!).



What other nib wonders may be out there, deserving good homes and regular use?



Tom K.


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Followed by the limited edition yellow known as Falling Leaves?

 

~ Replete with miniature faceted peridots and chrysoberyls in classic ginkgo patterns.

The limited edition Ginkgo Green ink merits its sky-high pricing by having droplets of fossilized persimmon added for sheen intensification.

The discreet advertising campaign will feature a close-up of a snow leopard resting on fallen ginkgo foliage with pen and ink prominently placed.

“For the discerning Montblanc Ginkgoist...”

Tom K.

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Happy Birthday, sir. It is always a great pleasure to read your interesting posts, Tom. They are even more special today because they include not only your ideas & opinions, but your beautiful photographs of some extraordinary nibs, and your lovely art. Thank you once again from an old retired overseas teacher to one who remains youthful & in the game. Many happy returns. Best wishes, Barry

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Remedial penmanship

Is there any such animal as a Hemingway O3B? Couldnt imagine its impossible as a #9 nib. Just curious as an exception to the 149-only rule.

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Is there any such animal as a Hemingway O3B? Couldnt imagine its impossible as a #9 nib. Just curious as an exception to the 149-only rule.

Two points in response.

 

1, The Hemingway uses a standard 149 nib so yes, O3B is feasible.

 

2, O3B is available on the #9 size nibs that are also used in large size special edition pens like the skeletons so it is not unique to the 149.

 

Hope it helps. It is probably easier to swap an O3B into a Hemingway than find one that has it already. It would have to have been a nib swap even when new.

If you want less blah, blah, blah and more pictures, follow me on Instagram!

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Is there any such animal as a Hemingway O3B? Couldnt imagine its impossible as a #9 nib. Just curious as an exception to the 149-only rule.

Two points in response.

 

1, The Hemingway uses a standard 149 nib so yes, O3B is feasible.

 

2, O3B is available on the #9 size nibs that are also used in large size special edition pens like the skeletons so it is not unique to the 149.

 

Hope it helps. It is probably easier to swap an O3B into a Hemingway than find one that has it already. It would have to have been a nib swap even when new.

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/97685-mb-hemingway-vs-mb-dumas/

 

~ Remedial penmanship and zaddick:

 

In several places I've read that the #9 nibs used on the 149 and Skeletons are also used on the Hemingway and the Dumas.

If that's the case, are those the only other models using the #9 nib? One post suggested that it's because they're based on the #139 pen.

Has anyone seen, handled, or read about examples of Hemingway or Dumas pens which have been fitted with OBBB nibs?

Are they out there somewhere? With a photo or two?

Thank you for raising this question.

Tom K.

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I foresee a second career in marketing...

 

~ Ghost Plane:

 

Those of us with an affinity for Montblanc's broader nibs, and other specialized nibs, might band together to toss advertising copy to Hamburg's marketing department.

To appeal to their sense of luxury, the terms of choice might include:

discerning, rare, exclusive, distinctive, refined and sophisticated

Perhaps it might be best to avoid any of the following, no matter how apt:

snooty, pretentious, blingy, ostentatious, high-falutin’, and excessive

Marketing Montblanc products would be an exciting challenge. Avoiding stodginess or visual clichés while evoking contemporary preferences with traditional elegance.

With a global market stretching from boutiques in Johannesburg to Tokyo, there's such a range of tastes to be accommodated.

The reliable 149 is often characterized as iconic, due to its widespread acceptance over several decades. Yet other Montblanc pens have an equal measure of utility and style.

Were yours truly in Montblanc international marketing, I'd tend toward associating products with vivid natural objects, in addition to the celebrity endorsements currently used.

But, after all, what do I know?

Sketches of fantasy pens may be the equivalent of on-line fan fiction, wherein stories about popular characters are posted.

Whenever I encounter Montblanc advertising in international airports — typically in the Persian Gulf or in Africa — I pause to look, no matter how familiar they might be.

Someday, just maybe, the Ginkgo Green ink may be released. Until then, Montblanc Irish Green writes very well in OBBB nibs.

Tom K.

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The 129, 139, 149, Dumas, Hemingway, 2000 Year of the Dragon, and any limited editions based on the 149 platform (many LE pens are based on the 146 size) including a lot of skeleton pens and 149 special editions are the only pens with the #9 size nib.

 

The 129 nibs and many of the 139 nibs were labeled with the size of "250" before the nubs started to be marked L139 and the 149. The special edition pens do not have such a 149 marking.

 

I don't know how far back MB was making the 03B size. I have never seen a 129 or 139 nib in that width myself, but I have only seen a few 129s and maybe 25 139s so that is hardly an exhaustive sample. So it is possible the size was not available before the 1950s.

Edited by zaddick

If you want less blah, blah, blah and more pictures, follow me on Instagram!

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