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Found This In My Attic


joesaladino
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I 1970-71 I used to both write for and sit on the editorial board of a local fourtnighly Urdu language magazine - in Faisalbad (the then Lylpur) - the copy of which would be written by caligraphers / Katibs on buttor paper using dip pens. A couple of the caligraphers working for the magazine had colections of very beautiful silver as well gold color bodied dip pens. It was fascinating to see them writing with such a speed and with hardly any mistakes. All is gone now. Feeling nostalgic I took a journey from the Capital - Islamabad where I reside now - to Faisalabad and visited the office of the magazine a fews years ago especially to ask about the fate of those caligraphers but I found none among the staff who may know anything about them. Technology has played great role in kind of disconnet from our glorious past.

 

Sorry to the OP as I am clueless about his pen.

Khan M. Ilyas

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I'd hazard a guess and say that the brand "E Faber" might be related/connected to Faber-Castell. But beyond that, sorry, no clue.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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E. Faber / Eberhart Faber had nothing to do with Faber-Castell. I do have wooden dip pens from them, bought in Germany.

I was under an impression it was a NY company.....but then can't explain why I have so many wooden dip pens from them in Germany, other than they may have been international.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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E. Faber / Eberhart Faber had nothing to do with Faber-Castell. I do have wooden dip pens from them, bought in Germany.

I was under an impression it was a NY company.....but then can't explain why I have so many wooden dip pens from them in Germany, other than they may have been international.

Not entirely true. It's all the same family. All three Faber companies. But they were fierce competitors in the old days.

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E. Faber / Eberhart Faber had nothing to do with Faber-Castell. I do have wooden dip pens from them, bought in Germany.

I was under an impression it was a NY company.....but then can't explain why I have so many wooden dip pens from them in Germany, other than they may have been international.

 

Eberhard Faber was a US pencil company in Brooklyn, NY, maker of the famous Mongol pencils and the Blackwing ("Half the pressure - Twice the speed"). They were founded by a member of the German pencil-making Faber family, who owned what became Faber-Castell pencils. Eberhard-Faber was seperate, and, as Astron mentions, E-F and F-C competed fiercely. For details, see "The Pencil", by Henry Petroski.

 

Just to make "pencil-spotting" confusing, in the mid-90s, Faber-Castell bought Eberhard-Faber, part of a process by which F-C also bought Venus ("Velvet") and Berol ("Mirado"). In the late, '60s, by the way, Venus had merged with Esterbrook. That's when Esterbrook moved from Camden, NJ to Cherry Hill, and the Esterbrook corporate records ended up in a town dump.

 

By about 2000, Newell Rubbermaid had bought Faber-Castell, which is how the conglomerate came to own the rights to the Esterbrook name. They used it for a line of "magic markers" in Latin America.

 

"E Faber" might have been an Eberhard Faber product. It would have fit as another writing product. (However, it might have been the trade-mark of yet about member of the writing Faber family!)

Edited by welch

Washington Nationals 2019: the fight for .500; "stay in the fight"; WON the fight

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Adding to the Faber trivia fest: Faber-Castell, along with Staedtler, Rotring and Koh-I-Noor, was a major supplier of drafting pencils and pens in the middle to late 20th Century.

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I think we’ve succeeded in thoroughly muddying the waters, but it looks like a cool old pen that could be a lot of fun with some fresh nibs.

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I 1970-71 I used to both write for and sit on the editorial board of a local fourtnighly Urdu language magazine - in Faisalbad (the then Lylpur) - the copy of which would be written by caligraphers / Katibs on buttor paper using dip pens. A couple of the caligraphers working for the magazine had colections of very beautiful silver as well gold color bodied dip pens. It was fascinating to see them writing with such a speed and with hardly any mistakes. All is gone now. Feeling nostalgic I took a journey from the Capital - Islamabad where I reside now - to Faisalabad and visited the office of the magazine a fews years ago especially to ask about the fate of those caligraphers but I found none among the staff who may know anything about them. Technology has played great role in kind of disconnet from our glorious past.

 

Sorry to the OP as I am clueless about his pen.

 

Look HERE

 

I had written a response but my post has disappeared :o

Anyhow, it seems to me you have got many informations here ;)

WomenWagePeace

 

SUPORTER OF http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/100x75q90/631/uh2SgO.jpg

 

My avatar is a painting by the imense surrealist painter Remedios Varo

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I'm glad there are stubborn people in the world like that newspaper and it's 27,000 readers.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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There was a thread a while back about not restoring pens and leaving them to show their age, I got a lot of stick for that thread and the majority of people said that they wanted their pens to look like they were made yesterday and I didnt know what I was talking about.

 

Perhaps this pen is a candidate to leave it as it is?

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There was a thread a while back about not restoring pens and leaving them to show their age, I got a lot of stick for that thread and the majority of people said that they wanted their pens to look like they were made yesterday and I didnt know what I was talking about.

 

Perhaps this pen is a candidate to leave it as it is?

 

I would agree, it's got a lovely color to it.

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It's a traveling pen. As you've figured out, when you want to carry it in your pocket, you slide the section with the nib inside the handle and the nib is protected. You want to write, you pull it out, turn it around and stick it into the holder with the nib out to make a nice pen.

 

Yes, it's Eberhard Faber, and if I had to guess, I'd say 1880's to 1910 or so. That looks like a Tedella nib. As far as I can find, Tadella was an independent company and made their pens in Minneapolis until sometime between 1891 when I find them as still listed by themselves, and 1900, by which time they were owned by Turner & Harrison.

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

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It's a traveling pen. As you've figured out, when you want to carry it in your pocket, you slide the section with the nib inside the handle and the nib is protected. You want to write, you pull it out, turn it around and stick it into the holder with the nib out to make a nice pen.

 

 

I agree that it is a traveling pen. I have a similar pen, although made by Dixon (also known for pencil making). Mine is different in that the other end of the barrel conceals a wooden pencil, and the section with the nib has an eraser, A very clever design IMHO.

post-265-0-05104500-1508726461_thumb.jpg

post-265-0-23078400-1508726480_thumb.jpg

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There was a thread a while back about not restoring pens and leaving them to show their age, I got a lot of stick for that thread and the majority of people said that they wanted their pens to look like they were made yesterday and I didnt know what I was talking about.

 

Perhaps this pen is a candidate to leave it as it is?

 

I once volunteer work for an archaeologist in my student days, and I think his professional opinion regarding these are most insightful. During the summer I working with him ( together with several other volunteer and intern ) He did teach us the basic motto about preserving artifacts. What he basically said is " We try to preserve them as possible as we can to the original state it came in, but on the condition that it would not further deteriorate. If such process is occurring then its our job to made repair, restoration, and made it so that we can halt this deterioration and keep the artifact as close to its original state as possible"

 

I think he got a point ; luckily for us interns and volunteers we mostly work on pottery fragments, and these usually only require a simple wash and rinse

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