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Pen Flexibility, Size/weight And Calligraphy



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I just ordered a Jinhao X450 with a Zebra G nib. Cost all of £12 including postage :-)

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Nice writing!

How does such a heavy pen feel for such intricate writing?

I have small hands, so the X750 gives me cramps when I have a long writing session and need to write quickly.

I'm wondering if the extra size and weight may help control the pen for flex writing.

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Compared to a Parsons pen this is light! I don't think it is heavy at all.

For long writing sessions, especially if writing quickly I would rather use a standard pen with a standard nib. This sort of pen may just complicate things. Having said that, Jake Weidmann seems to have done okay when he was taking notes at lectures! :-) but then again, he is a special sort of fella eh!

 

The nib on this does just glide along, which is what I have found with most Chinese pens.
I know that my Manuscript italic pens are very light, in case you want to try one of those? Also, very low in price, which is always good!

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  • 2 months later...

Just an update on my search for the "perfect" flex nib pen. After much patience and obsessively frequent checking of Minuskin's site, I was able to snag an excellent condition Waterman 52V with a factory needlepoint flex nib. I took her for a spin today and...WOW...as long as this pen works I don't need anymore flex nibs. It truly is a wet noodle that will go from 0.3 to 2mm with only slight effort and the snapback is fantastic! :happycloud9:

 

The vintage wet noodle flex may be allusive most of the time, but it does exist for those patient enough and willing to pay over $200 for a 100-year-old pen, well over $300 if it's from anyone other than Minuskin.

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JulieParadise

Congratulations! My advice would go into the opposite direction, though: Do not seek a known brand necessarily, not even a gold nib, but watch out for a decent no-name pen with a flexy nib. These can be had for much less, 20-50€ sometimes.

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Congratulations! My advice would go into the opposite direction, though: Do not seek a known brand necessarily, not even a gold nib, but watch out for a decent no-name pen with a flexy nib. These can be had for much less, 20-50€ sometimes.

 

I agree...there are some amazing no-name European pens from the 30-50s out there.

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Congratulations! My advice would go into the opposite direction, though: Do not seek a known brand necessarily, not even a gold nib, but watch out for a decent no-name pen with a flexy nib. These can be had for much less, 20-50€ sometimes.

 

Interesting Julie. What sites do you watch?

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