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Stub Nib Seen On A Waterman Charleston... Source?


Guest jonathan7007
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Guest jonathan7007

Dear FPN people,

I have a Waterman Charleston purchased in 2009. Mine is a "M" as marked on the feed. The small nib is stock - marked PARIS 18K-750" It flows/writes well.

 

I found a Spanish-language video that demonstrated the pen. At the beginning (time mark 1:50) however, when the cap comes off we see a wide stub with the Waterman logo. At 3:50 approx the reviewer shows the somewhat flexible and free-flowing capabilities of this nib. No indication that there is a different feed.

 

Please, if you have time, take a look at this video and tell me if you know how I can find the nib pictured. I love broad italics and stubs. My handwriting suits these nibs well; I just write letters, cards, and research notes. No calligraphy business or craft - just fun everyday stuff.

 

Seen at 1:50 (not while writing) and then writing at 3:52 in a video (Spanish-language) posted here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FnxEmLVcnM8

Be aware that on my computer I had to turn the volume WAY up to hear the commentator. Wish I understood Spanish!

Thanks, in advance, for any comments.

Jonathan7007

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Waterman makes a stub nib for the Charleston (I believe the designation is "SU"). Nibs.com has them currently listed for $129, and there are other sellers as well, e.g. on Amazon. You might be able to get one from Waterman in an exchange.

 

As for the flex in the video, who knows how hard he's pushing that nib?

Edited by Tweel

fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
-- John Purdue (1863)

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Guest jonathan7007

Tweel,

Thanks for the information. I had visited nibs.com but hadn't found the info... will revisit. $129 may dissuade me. I bought the pen from a stationery store back in 2009 for $65. I can't think they'd offer a low-price exchange given the age of the pen. I'll ask.

 

I avoid the very appealing high end pens and nib swaps because I budget a little less than some others to this wonderful hobby. I have been communicating for a few days with Waterman Customer Service and am trying to get a answer from them. It is interesting that their representative wrote me that the little nib now installed (in my case the "M") was the "most flexible" of their stock nibs. Here are her exact words, because I infer some of the context above.

"The nib is a medium (M) 18K Gold with rhodium over it. This is the most flexible nib we offer. You will not be able to keep the nib and swap out a feed section. The nib, feed, and gripper section are all one piece. "

Odd reference to an unrequested feed swap as I only wanted to know what nibs were offered. I assumed the section and or feed might need to come along for the ride.

 

Tweel, you watched the video - did that look like their SU nib unit?

 

Thanks again for the answer.

Jonathan7007

Edited by jonathan7007
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I also have a few Waterman Charleston pens. Really like the way they write and fit in my hand.

I had not thought about a stub nib in one of them, but now you have me wanting one.😋

 

The way the Waterman customer service person was talking it sounds like the feed and grip section are meant to be one piece. The nib itself should just pull out. There has to be a nib out there that will fit in these pens. Hopefully someone will come up with the answer.

Thanks for the post.

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Guest jonathan7007

Has anyone reading these posts ever used one of the Waterman-made stubs - and willing to write a quick review? Or just note some impressions?

 

One big help would be a translation of the Spanish-language comments about the pen and nib in the YouTube video!

Here:

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Tweel, you watched the video - did that look like their SU nib unit?

 

It looks like a couple I've seen pictured, but I don't own a Charleston and can't say for sure.

 

Here's one image: http://www.leighreyes.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/charlestonstub.jpg

 

Has anyone reading these posts ever used one of the Waterman-made stubs - and willing to write a quick review? Or just note some impressions?

 

I have a Carène Deluxe with a stub nib. It's fairly crisp, writing more like an italic than a rounded-off stub, but very smoothly without catching on the paper. As I recall, the line width is somewhere around 0.7 - 0.8 mm. It's a Carène, so zero flex.

fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
-- John Purdue (1863)

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I tried out a stub nib Carene a while back (didn't buy it as I had splurged the previous month). Very smooth, really good line definition, and a nice softness (not flex) - a very pleasant experience. I find Waterman stub and broad nibs always deliver a good experience and lay down a good solid line.

 

I have a Charleston 'ivory' and you have me thinking a stub nib for it would be rather nice...

Too many pens, too little time!

http://fountainpenlove.blogspot.fr/

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Guest jonathan7007

A Portuguese YouTube video presented the ivory Charleston and I really liked the color combination of the gold and ivory body. I have the black with Rhodium plated nib and silvery trim. Boring!

 

Thank you to you and Tweel for the impressions of the Carène version. I may keep an targeted background search at eBay for a couple of months to see if it will rope in a used or otherwise less expensive Waterman stub replacement. Perhaps the experienced collectors are used to buying a nib for twice the cost of the whole pen, but I'm not there yet.

 

I had found Ms. Reyes' blog a couple of days ago where I saw a writing sample of the stub. so I will search out that post, perhaps the one I saw.

 

(EDIT) No, that's a 2009 page new to me and I am trying to find her matching 2009 written content within her blog... Very useful sample, thank you. She has a nice lettering style.

Edited by jonathan7007
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Thank you to you and Tweel for the impressions of the Carène version.

 

You're welcome.

 

Perhaps the experienced collectors are used to buying a nib for twice the cost of the whole pen, but I'm not there yet.

 

:) The ratio wasn't quite that bad: $280 for the pen (a Deluxe with vermeil cap and Prussian blue lacquer), $170 for the replacement nib. I'm not wealthy, but I was able to do it, and wanted to because I thought it would make a pen (but not nib) that I loved perfect. And it really did -- I'm happy as a clam with the result and have no desire to collect any more Carènes. I have a lifetime pen.

fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
-- John Purdue (1863)

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Guest jonathan7007

Tweel,

I am "there" in spirit, just working my way to that threshold of pen-world confidence that I will get effective use out of any big-ticket writing instrument. As a professional photographer I've had to make some gulp-inducing purchases of camera gear or lease for studio.

 

I did find at least one more writing sample and a written description of the feel of the Charleston stub.

 

I have a plan for getting the white one combined with the stub nib I want, but it might take a while to find a new-old-stock or "un-used" white unit. Patience is key.

Edited by jonathan7007
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  • 5 weeks later...

The guy in the video is a german calligraphy master...watch his other videos. the nib is tuned by him, as he mentions in a comment below the video.

he also says, he is selling the pen, he also speaks english, so just drop him a note via youtube.

ciao

ralf

Edited by fightersmurf
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It is Peter Unbehauen, he has some videos on youtube and a website or two.

 

You can google his name to learn about him and his pens, etc.

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