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Sheffield Pen


mitto
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Last night a local antique dealer showed me a very beautiful red marbled body vintage button filled pen inscribed on the barrel as 'Sheffield Pen'. There is no country of origin on the pen and the nib is "warranted 14k". I assume it is a UK made pen. Does anybody know about these 'Sheffield Pen(s)' and their history.

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_v0YzkCPJQ3RGRULVpscHNEelE/view?usp=drivesdk

Edited by mitto

Khan M. Ilyas

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Will be following this topic.

 

Curious because historically Sheffield is the steel making town in the UK, especially cutlery and not known for any other manufacturing.

 

Interesting that it does not say Made in England or other references.

 

Recently bought a Danish made Parker with no other markings apart from LONDON. Including no Parker marks.

 

Being a 2017 Detective on 1930 pens is not easy.

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The inscription and filling mechanism:

 

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_v0YzkCPJQ3eWR3VW03aGxmbTQ/view?usp=drivesdk

 

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_v0YzkCPJQ3NEpzclZCUWFOdDg/view?usp=drivesdk

 

 

Nib and section:

 

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_v0YzkCPJQ3OVFTXzVyUkZMems/view?usp=drivesdk

 

The bad quality pictures are provided by the owner.

Edited by mitto

Khan M. Ilyas

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I'm not aware of any British-made Sheffield pen, though that's no guarantee there isn't one. Stephen Hull's "The English Fountain Pen Industry 1875 - 1975" doesn't list one either. 14k rather than 14ct is usually an indicator of US manufacture.

Regards,

Eachan

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Interesting pen, the brass threads are less common, usually a sign of better quality.

 

Shot in the dark - could the reference to Sheffield Pen, be not a makers mark but a personalisation - a give away - for a Manufacturer?

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Interesting pen, the brass threads are less common, usually a sign of better quality.

 

Shot in the dark - could the reference to Sheffield Pen, be not a makers mark but a personalisation - a give away - for a Manufacturer?

The marking is not a white enamel paint/print. It is proper pen barrel marking. Chalk has been used before taking the picture to make the marking prominent and visible.

 

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_v0YzkCPJQ3WUpfWTQxdHp3dWM/view?usp=drivesdk

Edited by mitto

Khan M. Ilyas

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Could this be a German pen using an English name for marketing purposes? "Karat" is "carat" in German (and possibly other languages as well).

 

As far as I know, Sheffield was not know for pens (even steel dip pens, that was Birmingham), but a foreign company may have just used the name as a brand since it was a well-known manufacturing town. Just a thought.

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

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I have been searching but haven't been able, as yet, to find anywhere any mention of Sheffield Pens. I am more inclind to guessing the pen as being of English origin.

 

Let us hope someone chime in with a definitve answer.

Khan M. Ilyas

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I also have no insights however my guess is that it is American and was sold by mail order by a chain store.

 

 

I would agree, the pen doesnt look English to me. The script is also not in an English style and doesnt look to be manufacturers work, looks like something later for marketing or mail order.

 

Pen is not listed by Stephen Hull, a definitive reference work.

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If it is American then the nib, at least, is not. An American pen would have a nib that says 14k.

Edited by AAAndrew

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

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If it is American then the nib, at least, is not. An American pen would have a nib that says 14k.

It looks it is a (rare?) mystery pen. :)

Khan M. Ilyas

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  • 1 month later...

Looking around I saw a Skribent pen (which I think was a sub brand of Penol) with the same nib. Warranted in a horse shoe with 14 in the middle and KARAT underneath

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I think the nib might be a red herring here.

 

Can you provide a photo of the pocket clip, and the stud / cowling on the cap.

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I'm pretty sure that Sheffield is a Danish pen name (not to say who made it for them). I wouldn't be surprised if was made by Penol

 

 

There were some pens for the Danish market that used English city names as their brand. I have an otherwise unmarked pen that has the name London on the barrel, very similar in style, design and colour to the 20s Duofold but better quality.

 

These pens were either made by or commissioned by the Miller Pen Company in Copenhagen.

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Reading the responses I have started loving this pen. The nib looks and feels to be a bit springy. I haven't got the time as yet to restore the pen, though.

 

And yes, beechwood, the build quality of the pen seems and looks to be quite high.

Khan M. Ilyas

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  • 5 months later...

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