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Tom's Studio Dip Pen Holders?



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New to learning Copperplate, I just got the most basic Tom's Studio oblique pen holder (the plain brass one) which is supposedly a present from my husband so I can't open it til my birthday. In the meantime, I realised I need a straight holder as well so I got the matching straight holder to play with...

 

Can find the Testimonials on Tom's Studio website but not many reviews of his pens. Just wondering if anyone here has used them and if so, what do you think?

 

http://www.tomsstudio.co.uk/shop/brassholders

 

 

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  • Pendarion

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I think a lot will depend on how your hand likes holding the slim shaft.

I like slim fountain pens, but I'm not sure about the oblique holder.

If your hand likes the straight holder, you will probably like the oblique.

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If the slender, smooth, shaft works for you then look no further. My hand requires a bit of traction and I like a lower inertia

holder so it would not be my choice. It is an individual thing and don't be surprised if your tastes change with time.

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Thanks both. Yes, I like really skinny FPs and the lighter the better! But you're right, I'm sure the more practice I get, the more likely my tastes might change, as well.

 

If anyone here has one of Tom's pens, I'd love to read your feedback and I will post here after my birthday when I have both and have used them for a couple of weeks... They are such handsome pens, I was surprised i couldn't find much about them online.

Edited by Pendarion
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An interesting design choice. I'm a straight holder person, myself. I like a little curve to my straight holder. I'm also not a fan of metal pens as my hands get sweaty. But it's a fun old world, and everyone is different. Good thing, too. Curious how you like them

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

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It would matter if I used my holders....I have some straight ones, that are old, @ 1900, a couple are metal, including a Russian one.

A no name plastic one with a feed.

I have a whole slew of wooden straight ones, Eberhard Faber, Swan and other common ones; in slightly different shapes.

Then I bought three oblique ones, one very fancy, one coated and one small one. They were ones well thought of by those who use them.

Someday.....someday, I'll get around to using them. Sigh Cubed. :rolleyes: :blush: :blush:

 

If I ever clear off my desk, I do have more than enough inkwells....even got Higgins, and Windsor&Newton inks in different colors.

Got good papers.

Got some twenty nibs, not counting a box of Esterbrook ones. All ready to go....but it requires work learning to draw the letters properly. ;)

 

If you want to make your dip pen write longer, take some of a beeswax candle, warm it, fit it under your dip pen nib with home cut comb/rills like a feed.

 

Yours look thinner than most of mine, but you are going to use it, go for it.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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...

 

If you want to make your dip pen write longer, take some of a beeswax candle, warm it, fit it under your dip pen nib with home cut comb/rills like a feed.

 

...

 

Ok, that's a new one on me. Not quite sure about it, but then again, in the famous words of Samuel J. Snodgrass, "It just might work...!"

 

I'll have to try that one one day. Where did you hear about this, or was it a personal discovery?

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

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It was here on the com, with pictures.

 

perhaps 'beeswax' in our search section, could bring up pictures if the poor fella wasn't on Ransom Bucket.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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