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Dip Pens? Glass Or What?


CharlieAndrews

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Hey Y'all!

 

So I have been taking an interest in dip pens lately.. I have a glass dip pen from Rohrer and Klingner and I love it! It's fantastic, but since it is made of glass, I don't want to EVER drop it. What's the best material for a dip pen? Glass, resin, a nib holding dip pen? I don't know much by way of dip pens. Can you make one yourself? Are they only to be found as vintage pens? :wacko:

 

Sorry for the bombardment of questions, I just like to be thorough. :)

 

Thanks!!!

-Charles

Edited by CharlieAndrews
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Hi,

 

I do not have extensive experience with dip pens, so other Members will have much to add.

 

Many dip pens are not at their best when paired with FP inks. :(

 

Some nibs / pens are vintage or discontinued, plus a thriving population of current production.

-> Not to plump a Vendor, but to give an idea :

=> https://www.scribblers.co.uk/product-category/dip-pens-and-nibs/

=> http://shop.kallipos.de/de/produkte/bandzugfedern (Makes me dizzy

 

I have settled on the Brause Ornament series. They have dual over-under reservoirs, so I can use FP inks and write a fair bit until I need to recharge them. The nibs I use are in the FP range of widths, which are smooth ball-shaped mono-lines. (I have enough trouble running a 1.1mm Stub at pace, and am not the least shadow of a whisper of a calligrapher)

 

They are sufficiently consistent that I can read across to what a 'normal' FP would deliver, so I use them for ad hoc ink sampling, and for the times that I choose a non-FP ink for a bit of jotting.

 

For square-tip I prefer the Tachikawa series.

 

Member dcwaites has what might be a better solution, but I've not had the time to give it a fair go: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/246789-a-better-dip-nib/?p=2690628

 

Bye,

S1

 

__ __

 

Brause Samples, from Gal-Lexi recipe :

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/FPN_2012/Mix%20Noodlers%20Lexington%20Gray%20Galileo%20Manuscript/INK776_zpsa5c68e2a.jpg

Edited by Sandy1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

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I have a couple glass dip pens and a couple nib holders. The glass ones work well for just plain writing, but you can't do anything with the nib. I prefer a regular nib holder because you can swap out the nibs as often as you want. Plus, glass doesn't flex, so you can't use it for any type of flex writing...or for getting any type of line variation for that matter.

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It's just a thought but I have a glass dip pen which is just lovely; but recently I bought a dip pen from Ranga Handmade Pens; it's fitted out with a standard nib and feed and I find this better for longer ink tests.

 

Al

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It really depends on what you want to do with your dip pen.

Glass dip pens are nice, but the nib, being glass, has little character.

 

With metal dip pen nibs there are so many different designs, depending on what you want to do with it - plain writing, drawing, calligraphy of various sorts, etc.

 

For plain writing, I now prefer one of the Falcon nibs, either by Esterbrook or Eagle. But others, like the Brandauer Scribbler or J-Pen might be interesting -- https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/75953-dip-pens-for/

 

And yes, I still use the FP nib mounted in a dip pen holder that Sandy1 referred to --

 

fpn_1370171562__fpdipnibs.jpg

 

I use the one on the right, a Huashilai nib mounted in a Tachikawa holder for testing and comparing inks.

It has little character, but gives me consistent results when comparing different inks.

fpn_1412827311__pg_d_104def64.gif




“Them as can do has to do for them as can’t.


And someone has to speak up for them as has no voices.”


Granny Aching

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It really depends on what you want to do with your dip pen.

Glass dip pens are nice, but the nib, being glass, has little character.

 

With metal dip pen nibs there are so many different designs, depending on what you want to do with it - plain writing, drawing, calligraphy of various sorts, etc.

 

For plain writing, I now prefer one of the Falcon nibs, either by Esterbrook or Eagle. But others, like the Brandauer Scribbler or J-Pen might be interesting -- https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/75953-dip-pens-for/

 

That post was super helpful! Thank you so much!

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I bought a collection of nibs a while ago, and one of them was a huge gold Mabie Todd nib with extraordinary flex. I sold it on to an FPN member who McGyvered it into a big Waterman. This got me interested in collecting a few of these survivors, and they're a treat to use. They were the precious tools of calligraphers and engrossers, and built of very nice materials. If you can find one in good shape it'll be worth adding to your collection.

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  • 2 weeks later...

TL;DR: If you like the experience of a glass dip nib, then you'll LOVE a real dip nib.

 

Dip pens are actually "my thing" more even than fountain pens. As DCWaites points out above, a glass pen is fine if you're just looking for monoline writing. They hold a decent amount, but they are nothing like using a real steel pen. For about 70 years steel (dip) pens were the primary tool used for writing in this country. They came in thousands of styles with hundreds of different writing experiences. They're relatively cheap, if you stay away from the ones treasured by calligraphers, and you can thrown them away if you drop it or if it wears out. There were so many made that even ones not made for 70 years are still disposable.

 

And you can do so much with them. Even if you have no interest in learning to write with a flexible nib, you can always use one of hundreds of types of stub nibs. (the left was written with a stub nib, on the right a flexible nib)

 

fpn_1461765040__stub_pointed_comparison.

 

http://pendemonium.com/ will be happy to put together a beginner's kit of nibs and a holder. Just write Sam and ask what they have. They also sell individual nibs from a rather extensive list. No connection to Pendemonium beyond a satisfied customer for 18 years.

 

“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928

Check out my Steel Pen Blog

"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne

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