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Victorian Dip Pen Identification Help Please?



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So, I got this retractable Victorian dip pen today. It's my first dip pen. It writes nicely and I am enjoying it.

I was told this was made in late 1800's or early 1900's, but I don't have any other information.

I appreciate it if you could help me identify this pen :)

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Dream, take one step at a time and achieve. :)

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Unmarked European ring top retracting dip pen..silver {? any hallmarks} with a scroll relief pattern.

Timeline appears to be correct.

 

Fred

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Unmarked European ring top retracting dip pen..silver {? any hallmarks} with a scroll relief pattern.

Timeline appears to be correct.

 

Fred

Thank you! I don't see hallmarks other than the word "sterling," but it is so fun to imagine how this pen was made, cared and came to the US :)

Dream, take one step at a time and achieve. :)

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No idea what it is, but it's very pretty!

Thank you! I will need to polish a little bit (enouh to still show the relief contrast) :)

Dream, take one step at a time and achieve. :)

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Very lovely little pen. What ink are you using so far? With a dip pen you are not limited to fountain pen inks.

You are right! Inks are unlimited :)

I have only tried fountain pen inks so far, and learning that some inks are more watery and do not stay behind the nib as long as others.

 

So far Iroshizuku Tsukushi works great for this pen.

 

I will keep exploring :)

Dream, take one step at a time and achieve. :)

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What you have appears to be a cedar pencil holder, intended to hold a short wooden pencil insert, the insert usually but not always having a threaded end. Is there anything holding the nib in place other that the tube into which it fits? That is to say, something to press the nib against the tube from the inside, whether a split plug or fingerlike tabs?

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The nib is a steel replacement (Joseph Gillot). The original would have been gold.

Thank you!

I will look up Joseph Gillot to see if there is other kind of nibs I can replace :)

Dream, take one step at a time and achieve. :)

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What you have appears to be a cedar pencil holder, intended to hold a short wooden pencil insert, the insert usually but not always having a threaded end. Is there anything holding the nib in place other that the tube into which it fits? That is to say, something to press the nib against the tube from the inside, whether a split plug or fingerlike tabs?

Thank you David for your response!

Yes indeed there is a split plug in the tube holding the nib.

Do you think someone made a pencil holder into this dip pen?

 

Tai

post-134999-0-84277300-1502647178_thumb.jpg

Dream, take one step at a time and achieve. :)

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Tai, it's tough to say without further inspection, but I wonder if there was a conversion -- the holder portion added (threaded into?) the carrier for the pencil insert.

Normally retracting travel dip pens have a provision so that the overall length of the holder can be extended.

 

Oh I see...I have seen one with both ends of the pen extend.

Whoever converted this into a dip pen has done a good job making the nib holder secured tightly in the insert.

Thank you David. If you are going to SF show, I hope to meet you there :)

 

Tai

Dream, take one step at a time and achieve. :)

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How are people at the San Francisco show going to recognize you? Are you the person pictured in your profile photo?

Yes, I am the person in the photo.

If I remember, I will wear the same glasses, too.

If you see me there, just yell at me :)

My name is Tai Goto (as in neck TIE). I have a longer first name but will keep it short :D

Dream, take one step at a time and achieve. :)

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In there is no hallmark, the original nib could have been bronze and or as well as steel. There were a lot of silver plated or the 'new' German Silver, a nickle alloy pens.

""""Nickel silver, Mailechort, German silver, Argentan, new silver, nickel brass, albata, alpacca, or electrum is a copper alloy with nickel and often zinc. The usual formulation is 60% copper, 20% nickel and 20% zinc. Nickel silver is named for its silvery appearance, but it contains no elemental silver unless plated.""""""""""

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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In there is no hallmark, the original nib could have been bronze and or as well as steel. There were a lot of silver plated or the 'new' German Silver, a nickle alloy pens.

""""Nickel silver, Mailechort, German silver, Argentan, new silver, nickel brass, albata, alpacca, or electrum is a copper alloy with nickel and often zinc. The usual formulation is 60% copper, 20% nickel and 20% zinc. Nickel silver is named for its silvery appearance, but it contains no elemental silver unless plated.""""""""""

Hmmm...mystery...

I am grateful for all of the information.

It is exciting to understand this pen more and more.

Thank you!! :)

Dream, take one step at a time and achieve. :)

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It's a pretty Vest Pocket pen.

 

@1895 shirt pockets and attachable clips for fountain pens came in. Attached cuffs and collars in women could sit down and peddle the wash machine; so Monday wasn't the only wash day.

Vests slowly went out of fashion.... :) due to the shirt pocket, and fountain pens too long for a vest pocket. :huh:

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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It's a pretty Vest Pocket pen.

 

@1895 shirt pockets and attachable clips for fountain pens came in. Attached cuffs and collars in women could sit down and peddle the wash machine; so Monday wasn't the only wash day.

Vests slowly went out of fashion.... :) due to the shirt pocket, and fountain pens too long for a vest pocket. :huh:

Thank you!

 

I have some polo shirts with a pocket short enough for fountain pens but probably good for the little dip pen :)

Dream, take one step at a time and achieve. :)

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