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Mystery Aurora (Optima?) Id?


requiescat
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Hello! I purchased this gorgeous mystery Aurora from Peyton Street Pens--the listing said that they couldn't figure out what model it was. I adore the pen to pieces but I'm curious as to whether anyone here might know. It's black and dark gray in what looks like auroloide, with gold-colored trim, and the cap band style is a dead ringer for that of my Aurora 75th Anniversary (red), ditto the imprint. The box and pamphlet give no clue--it's just generic care & feeding of fountain pen instructions. Anyone?

 

http://yoonhalee.com/images-pens/2017-07-24-aurora-black01.pnghttp://yoonhalee.com/images-pens/2017-07-24-aurora-black02.png

Honestly, my first thought was Monviso but I could have sworn those had chrome/silver-tone trim, and that the auroloide was black and light gray, not a very dark gray as shown here...Googling hasn't helped me either.

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It's definitely an Aurora Optima, and although I have seen this colour a couple of times I don't know what it's called. It's not a Monviso or an Abissi. I don't think it's a LE version. It's lovely though. :wub:

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Thanks, Chrissy! I'm not fussed about LE or non-LE--I mainly collect based on appearances and when I saw this one, I knew I had to have it. :3

 

(I wouldn't mind an Abissi or maybe a Nero Perla someday, haha. But probably not today! I need to save up some more.)

 

I can't get over how beautiful and reliable Auroras are. I really love vintage pens, but some of them are prima donnas about air travel so I can't carry them inked or SPLUT! :P

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I remember reading on FPN that Aurora originally reintroduced the Optima in grey and brown flaked colors. As you can see, the section is straighter than the current Optima pens; that is the first modern iteration of Optimas (the vintage ones were from the thirties i think). I don't remember exactly what year these were introduced, but I'm sure someone else will chime in. Also, I think this is from an earlier year than the red anniversary one. Also, fwiw the nib looks newer than the body of the pen; this version would have had longer tines.

Edited by oregano

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I remember reading on FPN that Aurora originally reintroduced the Optima in grey and brown flaked colors. As you can see, the section is straighter than the current Optima pens; that is the first modern iteration of Optimas (the vintage ones were from the thirties i think). I don't remember exactly what year these were introduced, but I'm sure someone else will chime in. Also, I think this is from an earlier year than the red anniversary one. Also, fwiw the nib looks newer than the body of the pen; this version would have had longer tines.

 

I agree this is the first generation of re-introduced Optima. There was an Emerald Green one, too.

 

I read some articles on FPN about this, but cannot locate it right now.

I think I used 'Aurora optima first generation' or something like that on Google.

 

Then again, it seems not every one of the first generation had longer tine nibs. Some has longer ones, and some has shorter ones. I guess it's a model of transitional period.

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This is the Aurora Optima Grey Cellulose Acetate (first generation). It was discontinued due to shrinkage issues. The shrinkage is visible on your pen as well near section and cap.

 

I collect these pens myself.

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This is the Aurora Optima Grey Cellulose Acetate (first generation). It was discontinued due to shrinkage issues. The shrinkage is visible on your pen as well near section and cap.

 

I collect these pens myself.

Thank you for the ID, AurorasLover! As long as the pen remains usable I don't mind--the material is so beautiful. I'd heard about the shrinkage problems with the earlier Auroras so I am not surprised, even though my eye is not good enough to pick up on it. I will enjoy it as long as it lasts, anyway. :)

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Be carefull also with the knob you turn to move the piston,

The screw is in plastic, and it could early brake.

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Be carefull also with the knob you turn to move the piston,

The screw is in plastic, and it could early brake.

Noted, thanks!

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