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Hello

It's all about Parker 45! as a Pen, nib or any part...

photos, links or even drawings will help us to know more about this mighty Pen and its variety models.


Best regards

H1N

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Nice P45 pens. Do you want others to show their 45s? The P45 and its models/versions are among the most discussed pens on FPN.

Khan M. Ilyas

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yes, nice pens ........... the variation seems almost endless. Have tried not to duplicate any of he o.ps. colours/combinations, so here are a few more. Why don't I have one with a gold coloured barrel terminal? :)

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Nice 45s there. It would be difficult for me to capture the variety of my 45s since I have around 200 of them and are lying scattered in different storage cabinets, cases, pouches and drawers.

Khan M. Ilyas

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“Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery that mediocrity can pay to greatness” - Oscar Wilde

If this is an open topic on all things P45-related, then the imitators have their place. Here is a quick, sunlit photo of some of the clones.
The Hero 800 on the left is emulating a blacktail flighter, the Wilson in the middle would be quite a find if it were an authentic Parker goldtail paired with the rare chocolate brown epoxy finish seen on some later 45s, and the Hero 1079 on the right (shown in profile) is more of an homage, since the one-piece all-metal hooded section is quite different than the removable plastic nib assembly of a 45, but it has been clearly machined to give the pen the iconic beak-like profile of a 45.
fpn_1499354737__p45_clones.jpg
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Interesting 45s and clones.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

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sorry to go off-topic slightly - in the U.K., a P45 was a document handed to you by your employer when your were sacked (forgive the pun) or your employment was terminated for some reason. You took this piece of paper to your next employer so that they might see details of you tax coding etc. etc.

 

and do these imitators live up to the quality and abilities of their hero ( :D ) - or do they fail to impress?

 

In the U.K., the P45 is probably the most commonly found modern Parker - understandable since the model was in production for so long - they can be bought in charity shops for £5, and often much less.

Edited by PaulS
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and do these imitators live up to the quality and abilities of their hero ( :D ) - or do they fail to impress?

 

 

 

To tell you the truth, I have so much enjoyment using the real thing (see the case below) that I haven't inked up the two straight-up clones. However, I can say that the feed and collar assembly on the Wilson is clearly inferior from a fit and finish standpoint, and the nib appears to have been stamped from sheet metal stock without a lot of care. The silver Hero appears to be much more in the same class as the Parkers when it comes to the nib (marked 12k for what it's worth) and overall construction and feel. I've read that Hero purchased some of the Parker machine tooling and continued using it to make clones, but I don't know that for sure. I also wonder about the collector on the copies - that little multi-finned bugger annoyingly holds a lot of ink when you are trying to clean out a 45, but I'm sure it plays a role in the reliability and writing characteristics of the pen.

 

I wasn't expecting much when I recently purchased the black Hero, but it's actually a well-made pen with some heft to it due to the metal barrel and section. It remains to be seen how well the glossy black finish will hold up, but I'm carrying it daily right now and it might become a favorite pen for me because it checks all the boxes I look for in a shirt pocket pen:

- Inexpensive and readily replaceable
- Medium size and diameter - slimmer than a P51 but thicker than a P15 or 180/Classic
- Metal barrel
- Hooded nib
- Writes well with Manuscript black - a pure black everyday fountain pen ink which starts out inexpensive but then it becomes really cheap because it is readily available at retail stores that have ubiquitous 40% off coupons (Michaels and Hobby Lobby)
A Parker 45 flighter will of course fit all of these characteristics except the first one - I wouldn't want to lose one!
Here is an assortment of Parker 45s with only a few duplications, including a half-demonstrator, a full demonstrator, some Argentinian Parker 61-style clips, a few Coronets and two TXs (which I would carry around every day if I could replace them for $20). The top row does include some predecessors on the left (Parker 19s) and two relatives sharing the same nib assembly on the right (a Varsity/School pen the New Slimfold). I store them with the caps loose, just in case that mitigates the tendency of some 45s to suffer from section warping. It may in reality just be inevitable shrinking of the polymer over time, but some people attribute it to the tension from the cap clutch.
fpn_1499378998__p45_case.jpg
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Nice P45 pens. Do you want others to show their 45s? The P45 and its models/versions are among the most discussed pens on FPN.

Thanks mitto (Khan) for the question, yes my aim is to open a window to its huge variety world

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To tell you the truth, I have so much enjoyment using the real thing (see the case below) that I haven't inked up the two straight-up clones. However, I can say that the feed and collar assembly on the Wilson is clearly inferior from a fit and finish standpoint, and the nib appears to have been stamped from sheet metal stock without a lot of care. The silver Hero appears to be much more in the same class as the Parkers when it comes to the nib (marked 12k for what it's worth) and overall construction and feel. I've read that Hero purchased some of the Parker machine tooling and continued using it to make clones, but I don't know that for sure. I also wonder about the collector on the copies - that little multi-finned bugger annoyingly holds a lot of ink when you are trying to clean out a 45, but I'm sure it plays a role in the reliability and writing characteristics of the pen.

 

I wasn't expecting much when I recently purchased the black Hero, but it's actually a well-made pen with some heft to it due to the metal barrel and section. It remains to be seen how well the glossy black finish will hold up, but I'm carrying it daily right now and it might become a favorite pen for me because it checks all the boxes I look for in a shirt pocket pen:

- Inexpensive and readily replaceable
- Medium size and diameter - slimmer than a P51 but thicker than a P15 or 180/Classic
- Metal barrel
- Hooded nib
- Writes well with Manuscript black - a pure black everyday fountain pen ink which starts out inexpensive but then it becomes really cheap because it is readily available at retail stores that have ubiquitous 40% off coupons (Michaels and Hobby Lobby)
A Parker 45 flighter will of course fit all of these characteristics except the first one - I wouldn't want to lose one!
Here is an assortment of Parker 45s with only a few duplications, including a half-demonstrator, a full demonstrator, some Argentinian Parker 61-style clips, a few Coronets and two TXs (which I would carry around every day if I could replace them for $20). The top row does include some predecessors on the left (Parker 19s) and two relatives sharing the same nib assembly on the right (a Varsity/School pen the New Slimfold). I store them with the caps loose, just in case that mitigates the tendency of some 45s to suffer from section warping. It may in reality just be inevitable shrinking of the polymer over time, but some people attribute it to the tension from the cap clutch.

 

 

 

To tell you the truth, I have so much enjoyment using the real thing (see the case below) that I haven't inked up the two straight-up clones. However, I can say that the feed and collar assembly on the Wilson is clearly inferior from a fit and finish standpoint, and the nib appears to have been stamped from sheet metal stock without a lot of care. The silver Hero appears to be much more in the same class as the Parkers when it comes to the nib (marked 12k for what it's worth) and overall construction and feel. I've read that Hero purchased some of the Parker machine tooling and continued using it to make clones, but I don't know that for sure. I also wonder about the collector on the copies - that little multi-finned bugger annoyingly holds a lot of ink when you are trying to clean out a 45, but I'm sure it plays a role in the reliability and writing characteristics of the pen.

 

I wasn't expecting much when I recently purchased the black Hero, but it's actually a well-made pen with some heft to it due to the metal barrel and section. It remains to be seen how well the glossy black finish will hold up, but I'm carrying it daily right now and it might become a favorite pen for me because it checks all the boxes I look for in a shirt pocket pen:

- Inexpensive and readily replaceable
- Medium size and diameter - slimmer than a P51 but thicker than a P15 or 180/Classic
- Metal barrel
- Hooded nib
- Writes well with Manuscript black - a pure black everyday fountain pen ink which starts out inexpensive but then it becomes really cheap because it is readily available at retail stores that have ubiquitous 40% off coupons (Michaels and Hobby Lobby)
A Parker 45 flighter will of course fit all of these characteristics except the first one - I wouldn't want to lose one!
Here is an assortment of Parker 45s with only a few duplications, including a half-demonstrator, a full demonstrator, some Argentinian Parker 61-style clips, a few Coronets and two TXs (which I would carry around every day if I could replace them for $20). The top row does include some predecessors on the left (Parker 19s) and two relatives sharing the same nib assembly on the right (a Varsity/School pen the New Slimfold). I store them with the caps loose, just in case that mitigates the tendency of some 45s to suffer from section warping. It may in reality just be inevitable shrinking of the polymer over time, but some people attribute it to the tension from the cap clutch.
fpn_1499378998__p45_case.jpg

 

So nice

Edited by H1N
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Nice 45s there. It would be difficult for me to capture the variety of my 45s since I have around 200 of them and are lying scattered in different storage cabinets, cases, pouches and drawers.

Wow.... it seems you are our main source for that knowledge, 200 p45 is not a small number, what about to bring some to the light! especially those models/versions that are not shown on the net !!!

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yes, nice pens ........... the variation seems almost endless. Have tried not to duplicate any of he o.ps. colours/combinations, so here are a few more. Why don't I have one with a gold coloured barrel terminal? :)

Nice group

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Wow.... it seems you are our main source for that knowledge, 200 p45 is not a small number, what about to bring some to the light! especially those models/versions that are not shown on the net !!!

My interest has been in the variety of nibs that came in the P45s and not the versions/colors of the pen, per se.

 

And, I have been sharing on FPN pics of my 45 pens/nibs from time to time.

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/319518-p45-white-gold-nibs/?do=findComment&comment=3798633

Edited by mitto

Khan M. Ilyas

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Such a clever nib design, easily stripped for cleaning but well made and so very useable.

 

Terrific value new and one of the best Parker pens of the modern era, at any price.

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Nice. I have equipped all my happy color 45s with solid 14k gold nibs. And in some cases with gold rings and period correct gold clipped caps.

Khan M. Ilyas

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Such a clever nib design, easily stripped for cleaning but well made and so very useable.

 

Terrific value new and one of the best Parker pens of the modern era, at any price.

Agreed... :thumbup:

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