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13 hours ago, bunnspecial said:

 

Photoflo is quite literally a very concentrated solution of nothing but Triton X-100, a non-ionic surfactant, in deionized water. It's likely the best consumer source of pure surfactant available, and is not expensive.

 

BTW, use it sparingly.  As a darkroom chemical, it's used as a final rinse aid on film-basically it's the last liquid the film touches before it dries, and basically lets water flow neatly off the film rather than beading up and leaving water spots. It's used VERY sparingly for this, however-1:200 is a typical dilution(meaning I put about 3/4 oz. in a 1 gallon bottle when making it). Too much actually can spot the film even worse.

 

When adding it to inks, a tiny amount goes a long way. When working with say a 5mL sample vial of an ink, I will typically add Photoflo in 5-10µL increments. If you don't have a micropipette or an easy way to reliably dispense such small volumes, I'd suggest making at least a 1:10 or so solution.

I always dip the very tip of a paper-clip into the solution and then touch it to the ink-reservoir in my "Opus-88 SODF-Demo". 
And only for the absolute driest of inks...
At that rate of use, the bottle of "White Lightning" I bought will last me 4 generations and will wind up in a museum somewhere in the apocalyptic aftemath of the earth-based society that follows this one. They will have it on display as "...an ancient tincture used in the manual production of literature...a method not seen or used in over 100 years"...
🤣

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bunnspecial
1 hour ago, Detman101 said:

I always dip the very tip of a paper-clip into the solution and then touch it to the ink-reservoir in my "Opus-88 SODF-Demo". 
And only for the absolute driest of inks...
At that rate of use, the bottle of "White Lightning" I bought will last me 4 generations and will wind up in a museum somewhere in the apocalyptic aftemath of the earth-based society that follows this one. They will have it on display as "...an ancient tincture used in the manual production of literature...a method not seen or used in over 100 years"...
🤣

 

Yep! It does take a TINY amount, and it can/will last you for ages.

 

Photographer's Formulary(a great source in general if you need bulk chemicals not easily available from other consumer sources, although you'll not find dyes for inks there) use to at least sell a much, much smaller bottle of an equivalent product. With that said, I remember the price not being significantly less than the big Kodak bottle, and the stuff doesn't go bad.

 

I first dove into film developing in 2007, and got into fountain pens in 2011. The bottle I have is one of the old Kodak "beehive" bottles, which I haven't seen in years(recent bottles of things like HC110 that use to come in it now come in a tall rectangular bottle) and after a couple hundred rolls of film, throwing out more than one gallon bottle of 1:200 stock because it grew bacteria(not uncommon) and adding it sporadically to ink my bottle is REALLY full.

 

Even with the 1:200 dilution, a gallon still lasts a long time for me. I typically either develop in a 16oz. tank, which holds 2 rolls of 35mm or one roll of 120/220(I don't have much of the latter now, only a handful of rolls of Kodak TXP320, which is also no longer made in roll film at all, and even though I buy it when I find it it's not going ot hold out forever). Alternatively, I use a 32 oz. tank, which is 4x 35mm or 2x 120/220. I rarely go up to the 48 oz. tank as it's unwieldy and not often I have that many rolls to process at a time. In all that rambling, though, here's my point: Photoflo is quite literally used for the last step of the process. After the film has been thoroughly washed under tap water, I fill the tank up with Photoflo, agitate a few times(not enough for it to foam up, which is bad news and needs a few minutes of waiting for it to settle) then dump before pulling the film out to hang and dry. That means 1 gallon can do 16 rolls of 35mm film or 8 rolls of 120/220. At 3/4 of an ounce to do that much, that's a lot for a home darkroom.

 

 

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duckbillclinton

Previously mentioned to Ines but yet to post, modified Bock titanium nib.  Increased curvature (titanium nib on the left), compared to the flatter genuine Bock steel nib (on the right).

 

A forum member wrote me and ask about it a while back, so here we go.  My apologies, I have been really busy lately.  I will still write up my reply to Mizgeorge next week.

 

The writing of an article of my findings for ink film stability has already started.  I will post it in the near future once the first part is done.

 

IMG_20210924_140747.jpg

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duckbillclinton

Increased curvature will result wider tine opening, but at the same time it will increase stiffness. 

 

More strength is required to press down and open the tines, a solution is to tilt the tip up a bit just like the classic Sheaffer integrated nibs.

 

After all the bending, my plyer left 2 marks on the side, and there's a small buldge around the breath hole, I never bother to correct or polish them, because they don't affect writing.

 

IMG_20210924_134914.jpg

IMG_20210924_134953.jpg

IMG_20210924_140858.jpg

IMG_20210924_141023.jpg

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Awesome!
I always wondered why Bock nibs were so much easier to flex once you thinned their tines down.
Now I see why...it was the flatter radius of the nib.
🤔

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duckbillclinton
On 9/22/2021 at 7:08 AM, bunnspecial said:

Photoflo is quite literally a very concentrated solution of nothing but Triton X-100, a non-ionic surfactant, in deionized water. It's likely the best consumer source of pure surfactant available, and is not expensive.

I am actually able to get Triton-X100 too, and for a >=97% purity 100ml bottle sample, it's only 1/7 the cost of a Photo Flo 200 bottle (473ml).  Do you happen to also know Photo Flo 200's Triton-X100 to deionized water ratio?  For me, Photo Flo 200 will need online ordering, thus the wait time, Triton-X100 is just a drive away from the chemical supply store, LOL.

 

By the way, I have received my Photo Flo 200 bottle delivery, and it's indeed nice.  For 50ml ink bottle, I use a syringe needle to give about 5 tiny drops.  I know, I know, it's overkill, but the bubbles and ink films form nicely.

 

At the moment, I am also experimenting with PEG-400 syrup, PEG-8000 powder, HEC 10S powder, to replace gum Arabic.  PEG-400 syrup is a bit too thin, need to add a lot to stabilize ink film, and didn't improve much on ink feathering and bleeding, also adding a lot meaning ink color is diluted by a small margin.  PEG-8000 and HEC 10S powder are very powerful, even with a small amount, ink will get so thick that my pen keeps skipping during writing or couldn't even start, fun part though, my ink can be used to blow a HUGE bubble, and when it burst, the tiny splash ink marks on everything stops all the fun, LOL.  I am still debating if I should also try out certain PEO powders, but gum Arabic, PEG, HEC, PEO are all quite similar as ink additives, they increase viscosity and stabilize ink film, reduce ink feathering and bleeding, but substantially reduce ink flow.  Flex writing require huge ink flow, so adding the above require lots experiments to get the "right" ratio (actually, it's a ratio suits your writing preference).

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 9/25/2021 at 4:45 AM, Detman101 said:

Awesome!
I always wondered why Bock nibs were so much easier to flex once you thinned their tines down.
Now I see why...it was the flatter radius of the nib.
🤔

May I humbly recommend my writings on nib design and flex nib design?

with kindness...

 

Amadeus W.
Ingeneer2

visit Fountain Pen Design

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