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Detman101
14 hours ago, Grayspoole said:

 

 

 

These look very similar to the Zebra or vintage dip pen nibs that I have turned into Frankenpens on occasion with good results.

 

When you are ready to try again, I would second SpecTP’s suggestion to use a very smooth paper—Tomoe, Rhodia, Clairefontaine or, to a lesser degree, something like HP Premium 32 lb.

 

Dip pens are typically held at a shallower angle to the paper so try modifying your grip to accomplish this.

 

And finally, a little careful smoothing on Micro-Mesh, Arkansas stone, or another fine abrasive may help.  The nib is not tipped, after all.


All very good recommendations to be taken into consideration at a later date, thank you.

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Posted Images

Dip pen smoothing and upstrokes:

large.OcamIMG_20210223_025633-01.jpeg.468646865e11dde533953a8662a8ed45.jpeg

The top sketch above shows a magnified view of the tips of the tines of a new unused dip pen. 

 

The central sketch shows how the tips tend to wear down in use. The same result might occur by smoothing the tip on a fine oilstone if the pen is held at one angle only when smoothing.

Down-strokes and side-stokes are now much smoother, but in an up-stroke the sharp chisel edge at the upper edge of the tip is liable to dig into the paper. 

 

The third sketch shows a pen that has been smoothed mainly on the paper contact surface, plus any sharp chisel edge on the upper edge has been rounded off. Up-strokes are now possible.

 

The sketches are exaggerated, for clarity.

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Detman101
On 2/22/2021 at 10:29 PM, dipper said:

Dip pen smoothing and upstrokes:

large.OcamIMG_20210223_025633-01.jpeg.468646865e11dde533953a8662a8ed45.jpeg

The top sketch above shows a magnified view of the tips of the tines of a new unused dip pen. 

 

The central sketch shows how the tips tend to wear down in use. The same result might occur by smoothing the tip on a fine oilstone if the pen is held at one angle only when smoothing.

Down-strokes and side-stokes are now much smoother, but in an up-stroke the sharp chisel edge at the upper edge of the tip is liable to dig into the paper. 

 

The third sketch shows a pen that has been smoothed mainly on the paper contact surface, plus any sharp chisel edge on the upper edge has been rounded off. Up-strokes are now possible.

 

The sketches are exaggerated, for clarity.

Awesome detail! I will perform my usual smoothing and rounding on one of the Blue Dew nibs this upcoming weekend.

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Here is an unexpected deep connection between two unrelated activities.

 

A ) Modifying a pen nib for flex.

B ) Making a traditional wooden archery bow.

 

The remarkable connection between A and B is that both activities involve making fine adjustments to a pair of irregular elastic cantillevers. Both arts aim to achieve some desired movements and spring-back of the cantilever tips, at some target of applied force, without the cantilevers permanently deforming or breaking.

 

In a pen the elastic cantilever arms are the two tines of the nib. Metal, joined at their base to the stiffer nib shank, and both pointing in the same direction, each tine is some fraction of an inch long.

In an archery bow the elastic cantilever arms are the two limbs of the bow. Made of wood, joined at their base to the stiffer handle section, pointing in opposite directions, each limb is around three feet in length.

 

I have made a few longbows in past years, and the skills learnt then do help me now when adjusting my pen nibs.

 

Naming of names:

Nibmeister == Bowyer (pronounced bow-yer)

Tuning a nib == Tillering a bow

 

Perhaps we can learn something from an expert bowyer?

 

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So I have been fiddling around with Jinhao nibs to get flex.  The most successful design so far has been to grind the sides of the shank down to the silver inlays of a 2 tone #6 nib and then do the same on the tines.  I get good line variation from 0.4 to 1mm and it is a smooth writer.  On another note, Kanwrite makes #6 flex nibs in EF to broad and ultra flex fine nibs which all write great off the bat with no mods necessary.

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On 2/24/2021 at 9:04 PM, dipper said:

Here is an unexpected deep connection between two unrelated activities.

 

A ) Modifying a pen nib for flex.

B ) Making a traditional wooden archery bow.

 

The remarkable connection between A and B is that both activities involve making fine adjustments to a pair of irregular elastic cantillevers. Both arts aim to achieve some desired movements and spring-back of the cantilever tips, at some target of applied force, without the cantilevers permanently deforming or breaking.

 

In a pen the elastic cantilever arms are the two tines of the nib. Metal, joined at their base to the stiffer nib shank, and both pointing in the same direction, each tine is some fraction of an inch long.

In an archery bow the elastic cantilever arms are the two limbs of the bow. Made of wood, joined at their base to the stiffer handle section, pointing in opposite directions, each limb is around three feet in length.

 

I have made a few longbows in past years, and the skills learnt then do help me now when adjusting my pen nibs.

 

Naming of names:

Nibmeister == Bowyer (pronounced bow-yer)

Tuning a nib == Tillering a bow

 

Perhaps we can learn something from an expert bowyer?

 


Precisely the technique I use to get flexier tines on ultraflex nibs.
I dont' think I'll ever need a gold nib...steel is just fine.

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Would not rule out gold nibs, some are worthless nails indistinguishable from a steel nib in their overall writing characteristics and the experience they provide however, there are some real jewels out there. Omas immediately comes to mind, their 18 karat gold nibs are extremely flexible, springy durable and provide an amazing writing experience, tremendous wine variation and shading in addition to being exceptionally smooth. The same can be said for Pelikan both vintage and modern nibs in this product line are fantastic. I have an M1000 with a broad nib that is exquisite, Ultra Flex and ultra-smooth and wet!

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