Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Pelikan M1000 Current Vs. Previous Nib


strelnikoff
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello fellow Pelikaners,

 

I would like to confirm and hear if it is accurate - what I have recently heard about M1000 nibs.

 

Short background story: I own several Pelikan pens, always had and will. Few M805s, M605s, couple of M205/215 for pockets... but my buddy is M1000 black/green with medium nib.

I don't like gold trims, but with M1000 I don't care, it suits the pen perfectly. The nib is the reason I love it.

Medium nib, soft and flexy... so being into flexible nibs, I thought of buying one M1000 with F or EF nib, thinking that line variation will be perfect (seeing that my medium nib does show nice variation). Basically, finer tip with same softness or flex will yield nicer line.

 

And when I was about to buy one - I ran into a nibsmith whot told me to forgo new M1000 and try to find one of the older pens (few years) with black top on the cap and printed logo in gold. Current one is all gold.

He claims that new nibs are made slightly less flexible or soft because people were complaining about (?????) too much flex or softness.

 

So - is it true that previous generation(s) of M1000 had slightly different nibs i.e. softer or "flexier"?

 

Should I spend time and effort trying to find pen with black top and golden logo or - it's all just a myth, and nibs have been the same for years or decades?

 

Thank you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 21
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Bo Bo Olson

    6

  • Eccles

    1

  • jmccarty3

    1

  • strelnikoff

    12

I'm not sure I'd call the M1000 nib flexy, but rather springy. Sure, you can get some line variation out of it, but I don't really try to. My M1000 and M1050 are several years old, as are the extra nibs I have for them. I haven't written with any of the current production M1000 nibs, so I can't say that they're any different, but I'm sure others on the forum will chime in. My nibs are all super comfortable, like writing on a cushion of air.

Rationalizing pen and ink purchases since 1967.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both my M1000s, with an OBB and an OM, have the more modern gold topped cap and date to around 2012/13.

I find both of them nicely springy with a decent degree of line variation, definitely softer than the 2016 B on my M805 Stresemann.

Being the less common nibs, hence discontinued, they may pre-date the body & cap to which they are attached which would account for their 'older' characteristics.

If so, I'm very happy not to have got more modern ones... they are lovely to write with.

Glenn.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

soft and flexy = semi-flex......your 800 is a nail, 600 a semi-nail and the 200's a 'true' regular flex that is now considered springy, because most folks seem to know only nail and semi-nail first.

I from the day of B&W TV just think it a regular flex nib. :)

 

Some 5 years or so ago, I tested a 1000 in my B&M, and it was semi-flex....not springy like a 'true' regular flex. It was too Honking Huge for me to even think about...same with the 149 which is a 'Springy' nib....good tine bend but only 2X tine spread. I differentiate between a 'modern Springy' MB nib and the old fashioned springy (true) regular flex with3 X tine spread. The MB has perhaps better tine bend...to go with it's lesser tine spread.

 

I have some 26 semi-flex and 13 or so maxi-semi-flex. I tend to push the Geha 790 as Best Buy in a semi-flex nibbed pen....gold or steel equally good.

 

I can well believe that that nib was changed, in so many folks came over from modern semi-nail (400/600) or any brand, or nails (800 or any nail brand); and being Ham Fisted bent the nib in it is not as robust as the vintage 14K semi-flex.

And it is such a Big Honking Huge pen can understand them having trouble handling the size to go with an unfamiliar to the user semi-flex nib.

 

Now I can understand why some folks insist it is only 'springy', in that is what it now is. :(

 

Take the man at his word, he has experience with it and wasn't wasting his breath in advising a 'better' nib. You already have a springy nibbed 200/215.

 

What about looking for stub semi-flex in the '50-65 era of Pelikan or that era's semi-flex pens? If you post a 400/400nn, they have great balance. The Oblique of that era is worth having if you are right handed......I do think any modern post '65 oblique to be a complete waste of money...having had them in nail and even W.Germany 200. Tested some 200's oblique nibs trans-mailed to a pal in England........not the real thing.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

soft and flexy = semi-flex......your 800 is a nail, 600 a semi-nail and the 200's a 'true' regular flex that is now considered springy, because most folks seem to know only nail and semi-nail first.

I from the day of B&W TV just think it a regular flex nib. :)

 

Some 5 years or so ago, I tested a 1000 in my B&M, and it was semi-flex....not springy like a 'true' regular flex. It was too Honking Huge for me to even think about...same with the 149 which is a 'Springy' nib....good tine bend but only 2X tine spread. I differentiate between a 'modern Springy' MB nib and the old fashioned springy (true) regular flex with3 X tine spread. The MB has perhaps better tine bend...to go with it's lesser tine spread.

 

I have some 26 semi-flex and 13 or so maxi-semi-flex. I tend to push the Geha 790 as Best Buy in a semi-flex nibbed pen....gold or steel equally good.

 

I can well believe that that nib was changed, in so many folks came over from modern semi-nail (400/600) or any brand, or nails (800 or any nail brand); and being Ham Fisted bent the nib in it is not as robust as the vintage 14K semi-flex.

And it is such a Big Honking Huge pen can understand them having trouble handling the size to go with an unfamiliar to the user semi-flex nib.

 

Now I can understand why some folks insist it is only 'springy', in that is what it now is. :(

 

Take the man at his word, he has experience with it and wasn't wasting his breath in advising a 'better' nib. You already have a springy nibbed 200/215.

 

What about looking for stub semi-flex in the '50-65 era of Pelikan or that era's semi-flex pens? If you post a 400/400nn, they have great balance. The Oblique of that era is worth having if you are right handed......I do think any modern post '65 oblique to be a complete waste of money...having had them in nail and even W.Germany 200. Tested some 200's oblique nibs trans-mailed to a pal in England........not the real thing.

 

I have couple of vintage Pelikan 140s (Gunther's and "regular" i.e. non-"Gunther Wagner" marked) - nibs are well... vintage and semi-flex to flexible.

 

I don't want to dive into "how would one call current M1000 nib - soft, springy, flexy, semi-flex, flex"... current nib (my new M1000) has some "give" to it... springy, softy whatever it is - it gives some line variation, but being M (medium) and on a broad side, plus quite wet - visibility of the variation is limited.

 

Thus - I am after F or EF - and I bet line variation will be more prominent.

 

But I've heard that M100)'s produced before 2010 are bit more ... springy, flexy, givey :D so I just want to confirm this - if true, I'll go after used pen from pre-2010 production.

 

Given that M1000 was introduced only in 1997 (1998 most markets, and some 1999) - I don't believe there are that many variations and alterations. It should be easy to notice any difference in nib performance.

 

I agree, my 800's are nails, 600s are less so - but I still consider them nails...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both my M1000s, with an OBB and an OM, have the more modern gold topped cap and date to around 2012/13.

I find both of them nicely springy with a decent degree of line variation, definitely softer than the 2016 B on my M805 Stresemann.

Being the less common nibs, hence discontinued, they may pre-date the body & cap to which they are attached which would account for their 'older' characteristics.

If so, I'm very happy not to have got more modern ones... they are lovely to write with.

Glenn.

 

Gold top cap is from 2010 and on. I have one from ... 2015? not sure what the stock is - but post-2010. And it is springy, softy, flexy - whatever the definition may be.

 

I have M805 Stresemann (medium) and M805 blue/black (fine). Stresemann is nail... or a brick :) I could get 0.05 mm out of F nib, but that may be just an optical illusion.

 

You may be right, OBB and OM were rare even in 2012 so they were probably made before 2010. Now, we only need you to have one recent M or F nib and we could do an experiment :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure I'd call the M1000 nib flexy, but rather springy. Sure, you can get some line variation out of it, but I don't really try to. My M1000 and M1050 are several years old, as are the extra nibs I have for them. I haven't written with any of the current production M1000 nibs, so I can't say that they're any different, but I'm sure others on the forum will chime in. My nibs are all super comfortable, like writing on a cushion of air.

 

I agree, it could be "springy" ... whatever it is - it is not a nail, and the feel is lovely.

 

I did push my medium nib a bit - it does show some line variation. In fact, the whole point about getting F or EF nib is to utilize whatever springiness or flexibility there is - to get line variation as is.

 

The only way to know - is to have side by side pens, some/one pre-2010 and some/one post 2010. Preferably F or EF - and try & compare them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, below is my M1000 with M (medium) nib - performance. Clearly there is line variation, and regardless how we define this nib (springy, soft, flexy, semi-flexible) the effect is obvious. The ink is Pelikan Edelstein Smoky Quartz.

 

post-136832-0-38682800-1497026955_thumb.jpg

 

I could pull out ~ 1.1 mm line.

 

post-136832-0-81172000-1497026986_thumb.jpg

 

 

And below is M805 with F nib - almost no variation, so it is nail... but I love it regardless...

 

post-136832-0-77389400-1497027039_thumb.jpg

 

Then M205 with B steel nib ... and there is line variation (so I agree with above mentioned)... if the nib was F or M - line variation would be more pronounced. Also - although it is marked as B (borad) - it is more on the M side, as compared to M800's and M1000... and even M600's...

 

post-136832-0-94048800-1497027139_thumb.jpg

 

 

And finally - 140 Gunther Wagner... I made a mistake with dots above "a" instead above "u", but I don't speak German :)

 

post-136832-0-62479000-1497027215_thumb.jpg

 

 

So - in conclusion - I believe M1000 with EF or F nib will "flex" ... or something - and provide line variation worth comparing to vintage pens.

Only question is - nibs from pre-2010... are they more capable or not. I can live with current.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMO that's pretty heavy pressing on the 200.

 

Well, I like shading ink...which is a bit more in a regular flex nib than a semi-flex unless matched well with ink and paper, in regular flex is dryer.

That's some heavy pressing on the EF 140 too for EF.

 

I'd consider that 1000 to be semi-flex from the amount of line variation. ...but then again you got the same out of a 200. So looks like you are right...a springy nib.

 

Richard Binder has a fine 100% need to read article of how to spring your nib...of course he labeled it something else. Has to do with metal fatigue. After reading that I strive to never max my nibs.(After the first test)

 

I was Ham Fisted when I got my first 140 a semi-flex OB. After three months I was not so ham fisted, just in time to get a 400nn in a maxi-semi-flex OF.

Not counting Osmia, I think semi-flex to maxi is @ 5-1.

Osmia lets you pick....number in the diamond = semi-flex, Supra = maxi. I have 26 semi-flex and 13 or so maxi-semi-flex but 1/4 of them might be Osmia/O-F-C pens, with Supra nibs.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMO that's pretty heavy pressing on the 200.

 

Well, I like shading ink...which is a bit more in a regular flex nib than a semi-flex unless matched well with ink and paper, in regular flex is dryer.

That's some heavy pressing on the EF 140 too for EF.

 

I'd consider that 1000 to be semi-flex from the amount of line variation. ...but then again you got the same out of a 200. So looks like you are right...a springy nib.

 

Richard Binder has a fine 100% need to read article of how to spring your nib...of course he labeled it something else. Has to do with metal fatigue. After reading that I strive to never max my nibs.(After the first test)

 

I was Ham Fisted when I got my first 140 a semi-flex OB. After three months I was not so ham fisted, just in time to get a 400nn in a maxi-semi-flex OF.

Not counting Osmia, I think semi-flex to maxi is @ 5-1.

Osmia lets you pick....number in the diamond = semi-flex, Supra = maxi. I have 26 semi-flex and 13 or so maxi-semi-flex but 1/4 of them might be Osmia/O-F-C pens, with Supra nibs.

 

 

Excellent that you've mentioned Osmia! Recently I was thinking about buying one, but I've missed the opportunity. Now I see a 773 model available - any comment? I don't know much about the brand.

 

As for M205 - I have put some pressure but not a deliberate angry force :) then again it is "broad" with some inherited line variation. The M1000 - minimal pressure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Given that M1000 was introduced only in 1997 (1998 most markets, and some 1999) - I don't believe there are that many variations and alterations. It should be easy to notice any difference in nib performance.

 

 

 

Bock made nibs for Pelikan for a period of time. Pelikan switched back to in-house production with the M1000 nibs being one of the last to switch back to in-house production. This is circa 2008-2009.

2020 San Francisco Pen Show
August 28-30th, 2020
Pullman Hotel San Francisco Bay
223 Twin Dolphin Drive
Redwood City Ca, 94065

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting. I recently bought an M1000 green striped with a medium nib because it was on offer at a great price and I had loved the black version I got a couple of years ago which had a gorgeous springy fine nib.

 

And yet the medium nib disappointed me - no spring! Seeing this thread I double checked - both have the all gold cap. And even stranger, I just tried writing with the medium nib again and found it less of a nail. I have had this happen before, when a nib 'eases' in to use. Very happy that it has!

 

But that does rather disprove the nibsmith's theory - although of course the older pens may have even nicer nibs. But the fine nib is one of the nicest I have.

I chose my user name years ago - I have no links to BBS pens (other than owning one!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting. I recently bought an M1000 green striped with a medium nib because it was on offer at a great price and I had loved the black version I got a couple of years ago which had a gorgeous springy fine nib.

 

And yet the medium nib disappointed me - no spring! Seeing this thread I double checked - both have the all gold cap. And even stranger, I just tried writing with the medium nib again and found it less of a nail. I have had this happen before, when a nib 'eases' in to use. Very happy that it has!

 

But that does rather disprove the nibsmith's theory - although of course the older pens may have even nicer nibs. But the fine nib is one of the nicest I have.

 

 

And that's why I'm after F or EF nib (with M1000).

 

My Medium nib gave line variation from the get go, but now it has some extra to it.

 

At the time - there were no F's or EF's offered and I got mine at a great price. In hindsight, it made me looking for more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Bock made nibs for Pelikan for a period of time. Pelikan switched back to in-house production with the M1000 nibs being one of the last to switch back to in-house production. This is circa 2008-2009.

 

Which is - according to "rumors" after the "nice nibs". Honestly, I don't mind new ones at all. Just wanted to check the facts, and should I spend time researching. However, I don't think the difference is that significant, otherwise it would be quite known fact.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Streinkoff, any with three numbers I'd expect to be an Osmia-Faber-Castell pen made after 1950....to late '50s. It should have a plastic gasket. My 773 KM has only Osmia on it. Faber-Castell started buying in in 1936...I guess they wanted more say. The Boehler brothers split their firm Osmia in 1938. Faber-Castell finished buying up Osmia in 1950 They needed a first class pen, which Osmia was.....Faber-Castell only made a second tier pen.

The bought a dukedom Faber-Castells had an ego problem....they slowly erased Osmia from the pen....until in the end there was just the Osmia diamond on the nib. The more Osmia on the pen the older it is. They bought a first class pen, then erased the brand, thinking folks would transfer associate to their name. :headsmack: They used the Osmia/Degussa nib still.

 

Osmia had had four different cap jewels, and five clips. One of the cap jewels was the Osmia Diamond on top like a MB Snowflake. One of the clips has Osmia on it, one don't and there were three other generic clips.

(Sometimes I wonder why...did the lower workers fear the boss, if their pen was better than his or as good...so hid it was an Osmia with a non advertising cap jewel and clip....???) Any German pen from the 30's-50's cost more if in color, outside of Pelikan.

 

I do have some BCHR in both Osmia and in Boehler. Something I never expected to have and then in some 7 months I must have gotten 7 or so of them....two or three not Osmia/Boehler.

 

Company started in 1922, when they bought the patent of a Osmium tipping from a Heidelberg professor....then the best tipping in the world.

 

They did not have an office supply company supporting the pen company, like Soennecken, MB, Kaweco, Pelikan and later Geha....so they had money problems.

1929 Osmia sold itself to Parker. The manager was Lamy. 1930 after a technology Parker sold it back to the brothers. The Germans thought the Parker Duofold too expensive...especially that before they started producing their Duofold, there were already a lot of cheap German clones. It did hold less ink than the Pelikan.

 

Osmia made great nibs....were a good solid pen.

1932 going broke, sold their nib factory to the gold and silver maker Degussa. The workers refused to move 45 Km to Pfortzheim, so the factory stayed in the Osmia building. Like MB, Osmia made nibs for others too....had sub brands, like Akkermann, the Dutch Department store.

 

I have other Degussa nibs that are good, but they like Bock made to levels the customer company wanted. Osmia remained a top nib.

If the nib has a diamond, it is semi-flex. "Normally there is a size in the diamond....2 or 3 or 4.***

If the word Supra is on the nib, it is maxi-semi-flex nib.

 

A 773 is a standard sized pen like an Esterbrook, Pelikan 400 or Geha 790. ***Mine has a smaller nib, without the number in in the diamond, and is a KM.....kugal....ball on top of the nib for those who liked writing like with a pencil....Ball points were just coming in, but the K nib predates that. It is a nice semi-flex.

I must have 6-7 Osmia and 4 or so Boehler....three from pre-war....same model number. as Oamia..with out the Degussa nib, in the nibs from Italy or Czechoslovakia could be imported gold plated.

Hitler stole the gold in summer of '38. The Germans couldn't make gold or gold plated nibs.

 

I have some steel, some gold in both the Diamond and the Supra nibs and they are = and grand.

So never make the mistake I made when I was a gold snob noobie....and not buy an Osmia because the nib is steel. :wallbash: :headsmack: I'd probably have five or six more....even then they were a touch over my limit.

 

They were more affordable 7-8 years ago, than now.

Osmia is a top of the line pen....if you get older ones with cork, you need a top of the line cork restorer like Fountainble in Belgium. The cork is boiled in paraffin, a thicker English mineral oil, bees wax and then smeared with silicon grease. Cork is the smoothest, most slippery gasket as it....that is the best way to re-cork.

Yes it is worth adding re-corking cost....then it's good for the next seventy years.

The 773 has a plastic gasket....I'd guess a 2.0 from 1955 and afterwards. Before 1955 gaskets were 1.0 to 1940. We still use 2.0 gasket today.

The 773 is plastic gasket.

 

Some of my later Osmia-Faber-Castell are screw out nibs. I'd have to soak my 773 before trying to unscrew it. So I don't know right now if it unscrews and have no plans to try.

That pen is down the waiting line. I used it a year or two ago.

 

400-15g, Geha 790=14g, and the 773=13g and the 400 is thickest, then Geha and Osmia are a bit thinner than each other too. Posted they all have good balance...I think the other two are a slight tad better, in the Osmia 773 is 'slightly light'. I still highly recommend the 773.

 

 

Medium-small was real IN, like the Kaweco Dia, Geha 760 and Pelikan 140. Osmia has that too....standard sized ones...with a bit more girth than the 773, and medium-large ones with a respectable girth.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The same problems folks complained about with Bock nibs, they complain about with in house Pelikan nibs....sameo-sameo.

 

My how the years fly by....I could have tested a Bock nibbed 1000 at my B&M.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The same problems folks complained about with Bock nibs, they complain about with in house Pelikan nibs....sameo-sameo.

 

My how the years fly by....I could have tested a Bock nibbed 1000 at my B&M.

 

 

:)))) thus - I will shut up and get in line with 21st century Pelikan!

 

Honestly, I cannot find anything wrong with Pelikan... for a fountain pen(s) they are probably the most consistent brand/maker on the market, and have been so for quite some time. I do have Montblanc's, several of them, "top of the line" and somehow Pelikan seems more solid.

 

Thus, I'll go for modern (funny since they're around only from 1997-98) M1000. Thanks for the comment!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Streinkoff, any with three numbers I'd expect to be an Osmia-Faber-Castell pen made after 1950....to late '50s. It should have a plastic gasket. My 773 KM has only Osmia on it. Faber-Castell started buying in in 1936...I guess they wanted more say. The Boehler brothers split their firm Osmia in 1938. Faber-Castell finished buying up Osmia in 1950 They needed a first class pen, which Osmia was.....Faber-Castell only made a second tier pen.

The bought a dukedom Faber-Castells had an ego problem....they slowly erased Osmia from the pen....until in the end there was just the Osmia diamond on the nib. The more Osmia on the pen the older it is. They bought a first class pen, then erased the brand, thinking folks would transfer associate to their name. :headsmack: They used the Osmia/Degussa nib still.

 

Osmia had had four different cap jewels, and five clips. One of the cap jewels was the Osmia Diamond on top like a MB Snowflake. One of the clips has Osmia on it, one don't and there were three other generic clips.

(Sometimes I wonder why...did the lower workers fear the boss, if their pen was better than his or as good...so hid it was an Osmia with a non advertising cap jewel and clip....???) Any German pen from the 30's-50's cost more if in color, outside of Pelikan.

 

I do have some BCHR in both Osmia and in Boehler. Something I never expected to have and then in some 7 months I must have gotten 7 or so of them....two or three not Osmia/Boehler.

 

Company started in 1922, when they bought the patent of a Osmium tipping from a Heidelberg professor....then the best tipping in the world.

 

They did not have an office supply company supporting the pen company, like Soennecken, MB, Kaweco, Pelikan and later Geha....so they had money problems.

1929 Osmia sold itself to Parker. The manager was Lamy. 1930 after a technology Parker sold it back to the brothers. The Germans thought the Parker Duofold too expensive...especially that before they started producing their Duofold, there were already a lot of cheap German clones. It did hold less ink than the Pelikan.

 

Osmia made great nibs....were a good solid pen.

1932 going broke, sold their nib factory to the gold and silver maker Degussa. The workers refused to move 45 Km to Pfortzheim, so the factory stayed in the Osmia building. Like MB, Osmia made nibs for others too....had sub brands, like Akkermann, the Dutch Department store.

 

I have other Degussa nibs that are good, but they like Bock made to levels the customer company wanted. Osmia remained a top nib.

If the nib has a diamond, it is semi-flex. "Normally there is a size in the diamond....2 or 3 or 4.***

If the word Supra is on the nib, it is maxi-semi-flex nib.

 

A 773 is a standard sized pen like an Esterbrook, Pelikan 400 or Geha 790. ***Mine has a smaller nib, without the number in in the diamond, and is a KM.....kugal....ball on top of the nib for those who liked writing like with a pencil....Ball points were just coming in, but the K nib predates that. It is a nice semi-flex.

I must have 6-7 Osmia and 4 or so Boehler....three from pre-war....same model number. as Oamia..with out the Degussa nib, in the nibs from Italy or Czechoslovakia could be imported gold plated.

Hitler stole the gold in summer of '38. The Germans couldn't make gold or gold plated nibs.

 

I have some steel, some gold in both the Diamond and the Supra nibs and they are = and grand.

So never make the mistake I made when I was a gold snob noobie....and not buy an Osmia because the nib is steel. :wallbash: :headsmack: I'd probably have five or six more....even then they were a touch over my limit.

 

They were more affordable 7-8 years ago, than now.

Osmia is a top of the line pen....if you get older ones with cork, you need a top of the line cork restorer like Fountainble in Belgium. The cork is boiled in paraffin, a thicker English mineral oil, bees wax and then smeared with silicon grease. Cork is the smoothest, most slippery gasket as it....that is the best way to re-cork.

Yes it is worth adding re-corking cost....then it's good for the next seventy years.

The 773 has a plastic gasket....I'd guess a 2.0 from 1955 and afterwards. Before 1955 gaskets were 1.0 to 1940. We still use 2.0 gasket today.

The 773 is plastic gasket.

 

Some of my later Osmia-Faber-Castell are screw out nibs. I'd have to soak my 773 before trying to unscrew it. So I don't know right now if it unscrews and have no plans to try.

That pen is down the waiting line. I used it a year or two ago.

 

400-15g, Geha 790=14g, and the 773=13g and the 400 is thickest, then Geha and Osmia are a bit thinner than each other too. Posted they all have good balance...I think the other two are a slight tad better, in the Osmia 773 is 'slightly light'. I still highly recommend the 773.

 

 

Medium-small was real IN, like the Kaweco Dia, Geha 760 and Pelikan 140. Osmia has that too....standard sized ones...with a bit more girth than the 773, and medium-large ones with a respectable girth.

 

Bo Bo Olsen ! Wow! Thank you for this detailed explanation!

 

1. I'll read your post again

 

2. I'll re-think my plan to buy Osmia 773, get over the fact I've missed the other one (cannot remember which model it was, but older than 773 and bigger - with cork mentioned in description).

 

3. I'll look for other Osmia pens and get on board getting one (and consult you).

 

I remembered now - the one I didn't buy, the cork had to be replaced. I didn't know how delicate and complex cork preparation is.

 

And I agree about the smoothness - I have recently one of mine Waterman's 42 fitted with o-rings (old cork was busted). It is hard to turn the knob and just pain in the a** to operate. True, it doesn't leak, but the squeeze on o-rings is drastic.

 

Being an engineer, I bet that better o-rings would be perfect - softer (lower durometer value) and of smaller diameter...

 

Thank you for the reply! I'll ask questions soon!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With in a few pages in either Dip pen or nibs section is 10 words needed to hunt for fountain pens on German Ebay.

That is the place to hunt.

 

Prices for Osmia are north of 120 E...I've not looked lately outside some real pretty one that went well north of the E150 I was willing to go......it costs E30 plus mailing for Fountainable to recork that pen...or you can do it your self...........not O rings.

Marshal and Oldfield in their second edition of their great pen repair book, favor boiled in paraffin and beeswax cork (then slathered with silicon grease), in case one is repairing certain '50's MB pens with the 1.0 plastic gasket.

I had my ('52-54 only) MB 234 1/2 Deluxe KOB, done by Fountainble....my 742 ('51-55?) also, in those were those fragile telescope pistons....and I wanted the best re-corking that he does. The last was not used or only once or twice, but the original owner or someone right after had stuck the telescope piston down. The telescope piston requires a master to do repair not for DIY.

 

When not BSing here I am writing the worlds largest city slicker western, so don't have time to experiment with re-corking. I have everything but a clean desk....time and a bottle of will power.

One of these days, the desk will be clean, the book done.....the next not needing a mess of scribbled notes...................I have enough old pens needing new corks.

 

If one gets a cork NOS pen soak it first in water, in it will cork be bone dry, and crumbly.

 

Please feel free to ask me questions, I want you to have as much fun as I have. As I said, Osmia/O-F-C are the only nibs that differentiate between semi-flex (Diamond) and maxi-semi-flex (Supra).

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With in a few pages in either Dip pen or nibs section is 10 words needed to hunt for fountain pens on German Ebay.

That is the place to hunt.

 

Prices for Osmia are north of 120 E...I've not looked lately outside some real pretty one that went well north of the E150 I was willing to go......it costs E30 plus mailing for Fountainable to recork that pen...or you can do it your self...........not O rings.

Marshal and Oldfield in their second edition of their great pen repair book, favor boiled in paraffin and beeswax cork (then slathered with silicon grease), in case one is repairing certain '50's MB pens with the 1.0 plastic gasket.

I had my ('52-54 only) MB 234 1/2 Deluxe KOB, done by Fountainble....my 742 ('51-55?) also, in those were those fragile telescope pistons....and I wanted the best re-corking that he does. The last was not used or only once or twice, but the original owner or someone right after had stuck the telescope piston down. The telescope piston requires a master to do repair not for DIY.

 

When not BSing here I am writing the worlds largest city slicker western, so don't have time to experiment with re-corking. I have everything but a clean desk....time and a bottle of will power.

One of these days, the desk will be clean, the book done.....the next not needing a mess of scribbled notes...................I have enough old pens needing new corks.

 

If one gets a cork NOS pen soak it first in water, in it will cork be bone dry, and crumbly.

 

Please feel free to ask me questions, I want you to have as much fun as I have. As I said, Osmia/O-F-C are the only nibs that differentiate between semi-flex (Diamond) and maxi-semi-flex (Supra).

 

First of all - I'm looking forward to read your book! I hope - in time - you will share the details, title and - where to find it :) Preferably in English, since my German is below acceptable, I know only few colloquial words and phrases.

 

I have found one seller from Germany on eBay and by now I have bought 4 pens.

 

From time to time, there is an odd Osmia offered, as it was that one I've missed, and current 773. Prices are reasonable and pen condition(s) are excellent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      37808
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      30917
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. jar
      jar
      26101
    5. wimg
      wimg
      25595
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • Matthew TWP
      @Ruaidhri This was an absolutely wonderful bit of writing, and I hope that you're able to maintain the style once all of the medications are out of your system.  Take care and recover quickly!
    • Dr.X
      Very punny daniel
    • danielfalgerho
      These comments make me sad as I sympathise with Ruaidhri, having great difficulties in being taken seriously. Or being taken at all (no off-colors jokes, please!) In spite of overwhelming odds,  Ruaidhri -now I know how to spell it- made a courageous decision and stuck to it. I was diagnosed with a similar growth in a place I will not reveal. Oh, well, if you insist it was Mount Sinai Hospital. But I firmly intend to walk in Ruaidhri's footsteps, if he will let me, on my next visit to Dublin.
    • ParramattaPaul
      Reminds me of the day my associates and I developed a cure for all mankind's ills and mistakenly wrote it down with invisible ink.
    • AnneD
      Was that the end of the Laboratory? Somehow the exactitude created a fully destructive device, as always!
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Expiring Soon

    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 11 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 11 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 11 months
  • Random Adverts

  • Files

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. alborticus
      alborticus
      (40 years old)
    2. ardvarticus
      ardvarticus
      (28 years old)
    3. BB Crafts
      BB Crafts
    4. bbqncigars
      bbqncigars
      (82 years old)
    5. Caneta
      Caneta
      (55 years old)





×
×
  • Create New...