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Review - Lamy 2000 - What I Like To Call The L2K



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ParkerDuofold

Hello Everyone,

 

This is my VERY FIRST pen review; so please be gentle. :) My apologies that the pics are not better, but I do not play well with photography and/or IT. :blush:

 

 

I'll be reviewing the ubiquitous Lamy 2000 in classic Makrolon with a medium nib. I know it's been done to death... but it's the pen I'm most familiar with... and more to the point, it is a FANTASTIC pen that deserves every bit of the attention it gets. :)

 

A little history... Lamy consigned Gerd Mueller, (a famed designer), in 1964 to design a revolutionary new pen; in 1966, the L2K was debuted. The 2000, (the name signifying, I would assume a pen ahead of its time, i.e., a pen heralding in the next century), definitely hit the mark. Seventeen years into the "next century" with no signs of stopping, the L2K continues as one of the best fountain pens money can buy; despite it's few quirks.

 

The L2K was the third fp I ever bought, (following an Al-Star and a Studio), and it has become my edc pen... I carry it daily to work and when I come home, (when I make it home - sometimes I have to spend the night at work), and I change out of my suit and into more comfortable clothes; the L2K always makes the transition from work to leisure... I've even been known to sleep with it... unintentionally, of course. :D

 

I was still very much of a neophyte when I bought this pen in the late Winter/early Spring of 2016; I had only been into fp's since around December of 2015... I even asked Drew Brown at Goulet if I had to be concerned about getting fiberglass splinters from using it. :lol:

 

I should also mention that while this pen is my edc now, I almost gave up on it... several times... getting the feel of the L2K's squared off nib tipping I think is the greatest challenge in owning one of these, but once you overcome that hurdle, you're in for one sweet ride, (the dog ears don't bother me, but more on that later).

 

For the basic stats and dimensions, I'll refer you here:

 

https://www.gouletpens.com/lamy-2000-fountain-pen-makrolon-medium/p/LMY-L01M

 

 

Some basic FAQ's, (that aren't covered by the Goulet's stats):

 

1. DOES IT HAVE AN INK WINDOW? Yes.

 

2. DOES IT HAVE A SPRUNG POCKET CLIP? Yes.

 

3. IS IT A GOOD FIRST PEN? Considering the square tipped nib and bottle only feeding; probably not.

 

4. IS IT EASY TO CLEAN & MAINTAIN? Compared to other piston fillers such as the Pelikan M-Series and MB Miesterstruck Series; Yes, it's on par or better. Compared to a c/c pen; it's a little more difficult. While it's easy to flush out, the piston does require occasional light greasing. I recommend a micro-brush for this:

 

http://m.ebay.com/itm/100-pcs-dental-micro-applicator-brush-microbrush-Regular-fine-or-ultrafine-/251842978741?hash=item3aa302e3b5%3Ag%3AM%7EMAAOSw3ydV0hJm&_trkparms=pageci%253A453b9ecd-43c6-11e7-b9c8-74dbd180a2d9%257Cparentrq%253A4ffab80015c0a8670b7a4660fffe5c32%257Ciid%253A2

 

5. IS IT GOOD FOR SUFFERERS OF RA, (like my poor mom): Yes, she held the pen for 15 minutes and found it very comfortable to hold... but still won't switch from her 25 year-old Parker Jotter ballpoint. :angry: :D

 

6. IS IT A GOOD GIFT PEN? Yes, if the beneficiary already has a fp or two.

 

 

SOME MORE BASICS:

 

Comparisons to other pens, (from top to bottom): Pilot Custom 74; Waldmann Tuscany; Lamy Al-Star; THE LAMY 2000; Pilot Falcon & the Sheaffer Prelude).

 

http://i.imgur.com/UlvhaMh.png

 

 

COMPARATIVE WRITING SAMPLE:

 

http://i.imgur.com/OKDanir.jpg

 

 

I have a tendency to babble, so before this review goes off in all directions; let me refer to the FPN guidelines:

 

 

1. Appearance & Design (9/10). Being a true Italian, I always believed that God (beauty) was in the details. However, this pen, (along with the Studio), has given me an appreciation for the Bauhaus Movement that would have been inconceivable to me a couple of years ago.

 

This pen has very clean and practical lines that definitely serve function over form. From the tapered barrel and "section" which seem to provide a universal grip section to satisfy almost any hand; to the semi-hooded nib which helps prevent "dry-out" while un-capped during all those long, mind-numbing business meetings, (especially when I'm talking :D); right down to the sprung pocket clip which is harmless, even to silk shirts, (unlike the little dagger Parker used on their 51's which ruined one of mine); everything about this pen's design shows it was well thought out to be a practical, utilitarian writing instrument. Not something to be placed in a felt-lined box and ogled, but a pen for the trenches. A workhorse pen.

 

Btw, I should also mention this pen is resistant to dry-out, period. When I first got it and found it so troublesome and put it aside... I put it aside for around 5 weeks... when I picked it up again, half-way thru the first downstroke, it started writing.

 

It lost a point for that too easy to lose and too difficult to perfectly position tab ring that's required to keep the cap in place. While the tabs themselves do not bother me, the fact that the ring is so easy to lose and so hard to position so that the seam between the section and the barrel does not show, does bother me.

 

I should also mention that there are a few that are bothered by the tabs, but personally, I can place my finger tips right on them and they don't phase me.

 

NOTE: In the "lost review"; Empty of Clouds raised this question:

 

"One thing though. You talk about positioning the tabs for the cap to fit. Presumably you are doing this because you have taken the pen apart? I ask this because on mine the pen cap fits and stays fitted regardless of how I put it on. Just wondering."

 

My Response:

 

You're right. Please let me clarify... the tab ring fits into notches cut out of the section, so it can only go one way, BUT, I find it important to make sure the ring is completely tucked INSIDE the section's circumference or you will get an unsightly gap between the barrel and the section, i.e., the ring cannot overlap the edge of the section.

 

 

2. Construction & Quality, (8/10). Overall, this pen is quite rugged; mine has been dropped a few times, (fortunately always with the cap on), and a couple of very fine scratches is the only damage incurred. One point here, the spring in the clip could be just a touch firmer; this pen can be unintentionally "pushed out" of one's pocket.

 

The engineering on this pen is a marvel, with virtual seamless construction, one could easily assume this was a one piece disposable pen; if not for obvious build quality which clearly indicates this IS NOT any kind of single use pen.

 

However, it did lose two points here for two reasons:

 

a. Condensation. Perhaps it's because I'm a hot-blooded Italian, but wearing this pen where it's exposed to body heat, like a shirt pocket, causes condensation to form on the grip section. (See pics below; ironically, it shows better on the Falcon's nib).

 

http://i.imgur.com/t6mshuD.jpg

 

http://i.imgur.com/YERmZxF.jpg

 

 

I think if a tiny hole would have been drilled into the cap, under the clip, this wouldn't happen. This does not happen if it's kept in a briefcase, desk drawer, etc.; I only have this problem when I carry it on my person.

 

Who else experiences this problem; it can't just be me?

 

b. Grinding noise. Until this pen gets broken in, do not be surprised if it sounds like your grinding glass with a mortar and pestle when you screw the brushed aluminum section back on to the Makrolon body.

 

 

3. Weight & Dimensions (10/10). No complaints at all. Beautifully balanced; posted or unposted. This pen fits my hand like a glove and the weight is perfect. Not so light that the pen could go flying out of control on smooth paper with a lubed ink and not so heavy that you feel like your hand is dragging an anchor behind it. Even my ma, who has severe RA, was able to hold this pen comfortably, but stubborn woman that she is... she won't give up her Parker Jotter ball-point! :o. I've "accidentally" left fp's behind when I stop by to visit, but she never falls for it. :D

 

 

4. Nib & Performance (8/10). This was the most difficult part of this review to write. The nib on this pen is both its triumph and it's downfall... and it's the reason I almost quit this pen several times; it was only my refusal to get bested by an inanimate object that spurred me to press on... and I'm glad I did. :D

 

This nib has to be positioned correctly; if it isn't, it will sing and then scratch. But once you master this pens nib, you'll have a writing experience like none other - it literally feels like you're writing on air.

 

I'll let these two characters explain it; they can do it better than I can:

 

https://youtu.be/5lBop5mDTA4

 

 

The nibs are solid 14k gold, (platinum plated), and available in quite a few different nib grades: extra fine (EF) / fine (F) / medium (M) / broad - B / extra broad (BB) / oblique, medium (OM) / oblique, broad (OB) / oblique, extra broad (OBB).

 

But realistically, you're usually limited to EF, F, M & B, unless you special order.

 

The pen is a moderately wet writer with consistent flow; I have not had any ink starvation issues with this pen, (which tends to be a more common problem with c/c pens).

 

 

The pen is not sold as a flex writer and I did not test for it; if you want to risk damaging your nibs, that's your prerogative, but don't ask me to. :D. (But with the semi-hooded nib, I would think not).

 

It is my HO, that the 2000 nibs run a little wider than the standard Lamy nibs; I think it is the squared off tipping that gives this effect. Hopefully you'll be able to see it for yourself in the writing sample above.

 

Another great thing about the nib is I've used it on all types of paper and the pen has not given me any grief; my only caveat is if you use it on cheap, absorbent papers like Wal-Mart notebook paper or the like; the medium nib will lay down a line of ink similar in appearance to a broken-in Sharpie. :D. (Bleed-through depends on the ink).

 

I've seen videos where the nib can be changed out, but since the pen was not "designed" for this and Lamy does not recommend it, I will just say... the ball is in your court.:rolleyes:

I, myself, have not done it; I'm happy with what I have. :)

 

NOTE: In the "lost review"; Gampupen raised this personal observation:

 

I found my fine nib to be ground a bit like the architect nib with narrow vertical lines and fatter horizontal line.

 

My Response:

 

Yes, I know what you mean; I think with the square tipping and depending at what angle you hold the pen, you can get that effect.

 

 

5. Filling System & Maintenance (9/10). The pen is a piston filler and IIRC, holds about 1.2 mils of ink. It's always gotten me through the day, (usually more); so having to fill-up at work or school shouldn't be an issue.

 

Cleaning and maintenance have already been discussed; I've never experienced any leaks or any other problems aside from those already discussed.

 

I find this pen very easy to fill and wipe clean.

 

 

6. Cost & Value (10/10).

Considering you get a platinum plated, solid gold nib which delivers smooth, wet ink flow and this nib/feed is encompassed with a very easy to hold body, (like I used to have :rolleyes:), I would say you can't really go wrong... I've paid more for other pens and got way less.

 

I bought mine, brand new from the Goulet's about a year ago for $149, IIRC, (right now, you can get one there with a beautiful gift box and a free bottle of Lamy blue-black for $159). Btw, I'm just a satisfied customer; I'm getting bupkis for my references to the Goulet's. :D

 

 

7. Conclusion (Final score: 54/60); about 91%.

 

 

I have a very high-stress and demanding job and this pen is my EDC for a reason... from the boardroom to the warehouse floor, it has never failed me... it has never let me down. I prefer it to Parker 51.

 

Would I buy this pen again... or recommend it to a friend? DEFINITELY AND WITHOUT HESITATION. :thumbup:

 

Faithfully submitted by,

 

Anthony :)

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It worked!

(I said I would get back to check on the pictures ! )

 

No Cacao du Bresil in writing samples?

LETTER EXCHANGE PARTICIPANT

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ParkerDuofold

It worked!

(I said I would get back to check on the pictures ! )

 

No Cacao du Bresil in writing samples?

Just for you MsRedPen...

 

http://i.imgur.com/OoPYUjV.png

 

My ability to edit the first review timed out, so I had to start a brand new one. Thanks for tracking it down.

 

Thank you all for your help and support. :)

 

- Anthony

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suzi_scribbles

Very nice review. I love this pen too. The M was a little wide for me, but the F is fantastic. Look forward to more reviews!

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Good review! You raised some excellent points. But the L2K will always be one of my very favorite pens. There is nothing out there to equal it . . . Especially in the price range. It is a stunning pen and loves almost every ink that I put in it. It is almost always in my daily carry.

"Today will be gone in less than 24 hours. When it is gone, it is gone. Be wise, but enjoy! - anonymous today

 

 

 

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ParkerDuofold

Very nice review. I love this pen too. The M was a little wide for me, but the F is fantastic. Look forward to more reviews!

Hi Suzi,

 

Thanks for chiming in and welcome to FPN! :)

 

I know when I bought mine, I wanted a broad nib and was talked out of it... I'm glad I was. The medium nib on the L2K is just right for me because I often write with larger, expressive characters, but the broad nib would have been too expressive. :D

 

The smaller you write, the finer the nib you should use... so they say. I'm glad you found the one that suits your tastes.

 

With the L2K, you may want to consider the next size DOWN from your usual nib preference, (because they tend to be a little broader); just as with Asian nibs, you should usually consider the next size UP from your usual nib preference because they tend to run a little finer.

 

Thanks again.

 

- Anthony

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ParkerDuofold

Good review! You raised some excellent points. But the L2K will always be one of my very favorite pens. There is nothing out there to equal it . . . Especially in the price range. It is a stunning pen and loves almost every ink that I put in it. It is almost always in my daily carry.

Hi DrPenfection,

 

Thank you. :)

 

I know, the L2K is a fantastic pen. I usually use Diamine Asa Blue in mine, (which is an ink that seems to play well with every pen I've tried it in - even the troublemakers :D ), but even when I've used more "difficult" inks in the past; they still rolled out of the L2K like water off of a duck's back. I've only had trouble once with ink flow, but unfortunately, I cannot recall the vexing offender anymore.

 

I know, I always carry mine... it is an out of sorts day for me when I have to put it aside for a day to dry out after a flush.

 

I've thought of getting a second one for the red ink I use and just have a matched set of pens for work, (I probably will, knowing me), but carrying a different second pen every few days also makes for some welcome variety.... as my grandmother used to always say... variety is the spice of life! :)

 

Thanks again for chiming in.

 

- Anthony

 

 

PS: Love your avatar, very apropos. ;)

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Morphling27

I just got my Lamy 2000 about a month ago and I love it. Mine is the EF nib and I experience none of the alleged 'nib issues' this pen has.

 

As backstory, it was a store return I got online. I can see why, as whoever bought it probably thought they were getting some vintage wet flex type pen. Grand Canyon between the tines. I didn't even ink it up as I knew a couple days slowly bending it back was necessary (it actually wasn't even cleaned before return/sale - some crummy ink in it and I suspect I know what it was). So, as you point out, these are not flex pens, I know 99% of us here know that, but some see 14k gold and run with it. Also, why anyone would try that with a hooded nib is beyond me, clearly if the nib is enclosed by the pen, how would you be flexing much?

 

Anyway, my EF writes very well, the whole tip is a sweet spot. Yes, it's inherently small for an EF, but it has a sweet spot rotated to any normal angle that most pens are capable of writing at.

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ParkerDuofold

Hi Morphling,

 

Thank you for sharing your story... it amazes me... and a better testament to the L2K's durability and resilience would be hard to find. :D

 

- Anthony

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Anthony,

 

Very well done for a first review. Your review tipped me from wanting to try the pen before buying to making it my next purchase once I get enough disposable funds. I have arthritis and your "IS IT GOOD FOR SUFFERERS OF RA" section was one of the things about your review which tipped me to move this pen from possibly someday to next purchase.

 

Brian

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ParkerDuofold

Anthony,

 

Very well done for a first review. Your review tipped me from wanting to try the pen before buying to making it my next purchase once I get enough disposable funds. I have arthritis and your "IS IT GOOD FOR SUFFERERS OF RA" section was one of the things about your review which tipped me to move this pen from possibly someday to next purchase.

 

Brian

Hello Brian1,

 

Thank you very much for your kind words, sir; I really do appreciate the support. :)

 

I'm sorry to hear that you suffer from arthritis; I have a small sense of how painful it can be through observing and listening to my mother, (whom I am blessed to have living close by). :)

 

At any rate, it was my interaction with my mom that inspired me to include that; I know it's a real problem for a lot of people.

 

I think you'll really like the pen once you get the feel of it. Thank you again for your kind words and input.

 

Be well. :)

 

- Anthony

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thank you. I am also interested in a lamy 2000.

How do you compare its weight against other pens?

 

Andy

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ParkerDuofold

thank you. I am also interested in a lamy 2000.

How do you compare its weight against other pens?

 

Andy

 

Hi Anders23,

 

Sorry for the delay in my response; however, I wanted to give you more than a cursory answer because weight can be a tricky subject.

 

There is weight, but there is also balance. Let's begin with just some basic measurements and then ramp it up from there. :)

 

I grabbed the pens I had inked up and laying close-by; most are common, a couple are not widely known, but they'll serve their purpose.

 

The first number is the body only; the second number is the pen capped.

 

After the weight, follows either a "P" or an "N"; this indicates if the pen is Postable or Non-postable.

 

*: These weights came from my personal postal scale at home; so figures may differ slightly from manufacturers specs.

 

10/16 P Platinum Preppy, (ED CONVERSION - so heavier than normal)

10/18 P Lamy Safari

10/18 P Pilot Falcon

12/24 P Lamy Al-Star

14/20 P Lamy Logo

14/24 P Pilot Custom 74

17/26 P Pilot Metropolitan

20/28 P Lamy 2000, (L2K)

22/34 P Sheaffer Prelude

22/36 N Jinhao X-750

22/42 N Waldmann Tuscany

24/36 P Lamy Studio

 

Next comes the VERY SUBJECTIVE part of my response, because everyone has different sized hands; different tolerances and different perceptions of weight and balance. So, YMMV! In fact, I can guarantee it.

 

I generally do not post my pens, unless I have to for a comfortable hold, (I have larger hands).

 

All that said, here are just some of my own basic findings; which are BASED ON MY OWN PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AND PERCEPTIONS!!! :rolleyes:

 

This emphatic statement is not directed at you, Andy; rather, it is a general address to all the nit-pickers and rivet counters that speckle our population here. ;) :lol:

 

The Preppy is quite light, but feels balanced posted and unposted.

 

The Lamy Safari feels light unposted; remains balanced when posted, but with a trace of back-heaviness.

 

The Pilot Falcon is also quite light when unposted, (too light); but has a little back-heaviness when posted because the body is so light.

 

The Lamy Al-Star feels fine unposted, but becomes b.h. when posted because it has a heavier cap than the Safari.

 

The Lamy Logo is difficult for me to write with unposted, but the weight is fine; but is a bit b.h. when posted because it becomes such a long pen then.

 

The Pilot Custom 74 is my second favorite pen; it has adequate length and weight, (with a loaded Con70 converter), for me unposted and still feels balanced when posted.

 

The Pilot Metropolitan has a decent weight unposted and is balanced when posted; however, as a side note: the step-down between the barrel and the section is very irritating... I don't know why these are so popular. :unsure:

 

The L2K has an excellent weight/length balance ratio. It isn't too light or too heavy; whether it's posted or not and it's balanced in such a way, that while it is a heavier pen than the ones previously mentioned, the pens additional weight doesn't feel burdensome.

 

The Sheaffer Prelude is a fine writer, but suffers from its short size, in that the weight is concentrated and the pen actually feels heavier than it is, even un-posted.

 

The Jinhao X-750's additional length does help balance out the pens weight, but it can start getting heavy when writing with it steadily.

 

The Waldmann Tuscany should never be posted, even though you can; the caps are quite heavy, (about equal in weight to the body), and you do not want to risk marring the pens beautiful finish. It is such a pretty pen to look at and such a pleasant writer, (with the right ink; mine is a bit finicky); I don't care about weight; just as you don't care about mileage in a '76 Coupe De Ville... you just enjoy the experience. :wub:

 

The Lamy Studio is an excellent writer and has great balance, posted or unposted, but the pens weight can become oppressive during long writing jags.

 

So, you see, weight and balance are two different things and can greatly affect your writing experience.

 

I hope this response was helpful to you, because now I'm more confused than ever. :huh:

 

;)

 

- Anthony

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You got a dang nice third pen. You'll be a master pen user in no time. Sometimes I wish I had a not - so - forgiving pen as my second or third. My handwriting would have made my 5th grade teacher happy.

 

(My Al - Star isn't forgiving either. )

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ParkerDuofold

You got a dang nice third pen. You'll be a master pen user in no time. Sometimes I wish I had a not - so - forgiving pen as my second or third. My handwriting would have made my 5th grade teacher happy.

 

(My Al - Star isn't forgiving either. )

Hi AL01,

 

Thank you; I hope so. :)

 

Yes, it has always been my opinion that if isn't a "flex" pen; don't try to make it one.

 

My penmanship is atrocious, (my printing is legible, but my cursive is bad); my elementary school teachers used to glare at me a lot and suck through their teeth when I handed in written assignments.

 

I also want to learn the art of "semi-flex" writing, (I also have a dip pen and a box of G-nibs). It's never as easy as they make it look on YouTube. :lol:

 

Thank you for taking the time to contribute your thoughts; much appreciated. :)

 

- Anthony

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thank you for the response in such detail.

Really appreciate your detailed reply :)

 

Thanks,

Andy

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Hi AL01,

 

Thank you; I hope so. :)

 

Yes, it has always been my opinion that if isn't a "flex" pen; don't try to make it one.

 

My penmanship is atrocious, (my printing is legible, but my cursive is bad); my elementary school teachers used to glare at me a lot and suck through their teeth when I handed in written assignments.

 

I also want to learn the art of "semi-flex" writing, (I also have a dip pen and a box of G-nibs). It's never as easy as they make it look on YouTube. :lol:

 

Thank you for taking the time to contribute your thoughts; much appreciated. :)

 

- Anthony

 

 

Thank YOU sir. :)

 

It took me six, (almost 7), years to get good penmanship. You are much older than I am, so no worries...

 

Your handwriting will be great soon. ;)

 

PS: (I have been interested in the 2K VS the P51. Don't write about it here... Just sayin'.)

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ParkerDuofold

thank you for the response in such detail.

Really appreciate your detailed reply :)

 

Thanks,

Andy

Hello Andy,

 

If what I said was helpful to you in any way; then it was my pleasure to have made the effort. :)

 

I hope you opt for an L2K and that it gives you years of pleasure and satisfaction.

 

- Anthony

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ParkerDuofold

 

 

Thank YOU sir. :)

 

It took me six, (almost 7), years to get good penmanship. You are much older than I am, so no worries...

 

Your handwriting will be great soon. ;)

 

PS: (I have been interested in the 2K VS the P51. Don't write about it here... Just sayin'.)

Hi AL01,

 

You are quite welcome. :thumbup:

 

Thank you for your encouraging words of optimism regarding my penmanship. Hope does indeed spring eternal.

 

You're quite right not to discuss the 51 within the confines of this review, as it could trigger a full-scale riot here on the boards and ruin this review. :lol:

 

Although, I don't mind answering any questions about it, if you have any... here or via a PM, if you prefer.

 

Mind you, I've only owned one; but it was a very nice specimen that was professionally restored... I just didn't care for it.

 

- Anthony

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Sasha Royale

I don't know the location of your mother's condition. Please forgive, if I intrude. Would she be more comfortable using a larger diameter pen. The jotter is fairly small. Sometimes, a heavier pen will self-settle into the hand, requiring less gripping. The Jinhao x450 is a large-diameter pen, but is fairly heavy. A lighter weight pen of large diameter is the Sheaffer Nononsense.

 

Anything we can do to accommodate a "Mom" is entirely pleasure.

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

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