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Newbie Grinding Montblanc 84 Nib


lawrenceloklok
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Recently my Montblanc 84 had an ink flow issue, and i took a great deal of bravery to grind this nib (which belongs to my grandfather!). It still has some scratchy (which is undesirable ) but the ink flow is better now. Is it a good shape of a standard Montblanc nib? Any problem? Any suggestions? (The picture below.) Please leave some comments to my first grinding job. It really helps. post-136037-0-56663300-1495122034_thumb.jpgpost-136037-0-86963400-1495122046_thumb.jpegpost-136037-0-08175000-1495122055_thumb.jpegpost-136037-0-35125000-1495122069_thumb.jpegpost-136037-0-64824900-1495122086_thumb.jpeg

post-136037-0-50250500-1495122396_thumb.jpeg

Edited by lawrenceloklok
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What were you trying to do by the grind?

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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What I want to do is to fix the ink flow promblem and remove scratchiness. Before grinding, it is wet in a particular position and dry in another.After the grinding, it is better, but it is still scratchy. Lastly, I want to know that am my grinding process is on the right track?

Edited by lawrenceloklok
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It looks like you have created a Left Oblique?

 

What's that mean,and how should I improve it.
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Nothing wrong with it at all unless you are left handed and/or angle your pen to the right. I am right handed and angle the pen to the left which means I prefer this type of nib. My Montblanc 146 actually came with left oblique medium nib fitted.

 

Personally, to smooth I would now get some 8000 and then 12000 grit and gently do some figure of eights on each. Then try the nib again. I generally do this a few times until I get the smoothness I desire, But be careful, be gentle as you don't want to remove the tipping.

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Nothing wrong with it at all unless you are left handed and/or angle your pen to the right. I am right handed and angle the pen to the left which means I prefer this type of nib. My Montblanc 146 actually came with left oblique medium nib fitted.

 

Personally, to smooth I would now get some 8000 and then 12000 grit and gently do some figure of eights on each. Then try the nib again. I generally do this a few times until I get the smoothness I desire, But be careful, be gentle as you don't want to remove the tipping.

Thank you for your comment. Lucky, i am right handed and what angle your pen to the right means? How can you tell that my nib is left oblique?

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No, you should practice grinding on a CHEAP pen. Because in learning how to grind a nib, you WILL make mistakes. That is just part of learning. You want to make mistakes on cheap pens that you can throw away.

 

re left foot oblique grind.

Look at the attached pix.

The angle of the grind (shown by the red lines) shows that you ground it in a left foot oblique angle.

A left foot oblique grind has the angle sloping down and to the left when looking on the top of the nib (so down to the right when looking at the bottom as in the pix.). Look down at your left foot and you will see the angle of the toes, that is why it is called left foot oblique.

 

Ideally you would have an even grind so the grind lines are perpendicular to the nib, not at an angle.

 

To eliminate scratchiness, you need to go after the edges. Corners/edges are what scratches the paper.

You also have to write on the flat of the nib. If you are writing on one of the edges, that is why you are feeling scratchiness.

 

I don't know how much tipping is left on that nib.

But if you grind through the tipping, you have ruined the nib.

Grinding is a ONE WAY street, when you remove metal, you cannot put it back.

post-105113-0-61125300-1495211173_thumb.jpg

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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Grinding is a ONE WAY street, when you remove metal, you cannot put it back.

 

Unless you pay Greg Minuskin or John Mottishaw a lot of money to re-tip.

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:D It is grateful for the support! This is the most amazing comment that i have ever seen, i really learn a lesson with an aid of picture. So if i want to grind my nib into the standard one, which tine should i focus on left or right? Or should I grind it horizontally? Edited by lawrenceloklok
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In order to smooth the nib, I have to find the direction of the scratchiness of the nib?

 

Could anyone tell which type of nib does my parker pen belong to?

post-136037-0-58359400-1495218327_thumb.jpg

Edited by lawrenceloklok
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post-57071-0-12446800-1495222686.jpg

 

FYI, from your earlier post, it appears you have ground a flat spot into your beautiful and valuable montblanc nib, see arrow and photo above. I suggest that you stop grinding away on this immediately and send it to someone who knows what they are doing before you damage it further.

 

Like AC12 said, you should buy some cheap chinese pens and practice and become proficient on those before you start to get into valuable nibs like on the montblanc.

 

:D It is grateful for the support! This is the most amazing comment that i have ever seen, i really learn a lesson with an aid of picture. So if i want to grind my nib into the standard one, which tine should i focus on left or right? Or should I grind it horizontally?

 

 

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As cell said, STOP with the grinding.

Since this is your first attempt, you do not have adequate skills to take on an expensive and special (grandfather's pen) nib.

Send it off to a nib meister to do it correctly for you.

 

You are not skilled enough, and could grind though the little remaining tipping to the base nib.

At that point the nib is ruined, and only an expensive retipping will save it.

 

Put the pen away and go practice on CHEAP pens.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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As cell said, STOP with the grinding.

Since this is your first attempt, you do not have adequate skills to take on an expensive and special (grandfather's pen) nib.

Send it off to a nib meister to do it correctly for you.

 

You are not skilled enough, and could grind though the little remaining tipping to the base nib.

At that point the nib is ruined, and only an expensive retipping will save it.

 

Put the pen away and go practice on CHEAP pens.

What ac12 said... :thumbup: Edited by carlos.q
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Yes I concur. I practiced on many cheap Chinese pens before moving to a more expensive and then it was many pens later before I ground my first Gold nib!

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attachicon.gifScreen Shot 2017-05-19 at May 19 11.08.59 AM.jpg

 

FYI, from your earlier post, it appears you have ground a flat spot into your beautiful and valuable montblanc nib, see arrow and photo above. I suggest that you stop grinding away on this immediately and send it to someone who knows what they are doing before you damage it further.

 

Like AC12 said, you should buy some cheap chinese pens and practice and become proficient on those before you start to get into valuable nibs like on the montblanc.

 

 

My heart was broken when i saw these comments and i have learnt a high cost lesson :wallbash: :doh: . I definitely stay my Montblanc from the abrasive paper.

 

In fact, i have grinded some steel nib before. This is the first time for me to grind gold nib and i have to confess that i am not skillful enough. In this grinding, I thought i have avoided the flat spot problem (I have created a big flat spot in my steel nib before), as i grinded this nib with water and in different angles. Could you describe how bad is the flat spot problem? I have grinded this nib on abrasive papers about 10 strokes each(2400, 4000, 5000 grit) So what other suggestions to avoid creating flat spot and what is the time duration for grinding a nib?

 

Lastly, is it expensive to send it to nib meister?

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At that point the nib is ruined, and only an expensive retipping will save it.

 

How bad is my nib ruined if full score is ten?

Edited by lawrenceloklok
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Yes I concur. I practiced on many cheap Chinese pens before moving to a more expensive and then it was many pens later before I ground my first Gold nib!

Could you post some successful grinding for reference especially the gold nib :).

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Well to be honest it has been mostly self taught after reading a series of posts on the Chinese sub forum authored by "ian the Jock" an "BobJe". It sparked my interest and began a little passion. I bought a load of Chinese pens and gave it ago. Then pulled out a really badly behaved Pelikan 200 and turned an absolute dog of a pen into and dream writer. Recently I worked on a M800 with terrible Baby Bottom and low an behold...a success!

 

I will enclose the link from the page were the discussion started.

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/295491-chinese-pens-show-and-tell/page-5

 

I think the conversation started at post No 100.

 

The Stub of The day https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/238274-stub-o-the-day/ is also another wealth of great information and pictures.

 

 

Ian

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How bad is my nib ruined if full score is ten?

 

It is not ruined . . . yet.

I do not see that you have gone through the tipping and into the base metal.

The question is, is there enough tipping left for a nib meister to salvage the nib? Only a nib meister can answer that question. And the answer may only come after he works on the nib.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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