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Best Ink Transfer Tool?


bizhe
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I was ready to purchase the item in the photo, but then I wondered, does it have enough suction to suck ink in?

If you have experience with this either way, please reply.
The reason I chose this rather than a syringe is that syringes become increasingly tight/dry over time, at least in my limited experience.

 

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Buy em'. Buy every ink transfer implement you can. Buy the Visconti inkwell. Buy the Twsbi vac inkwells and everything else you can find. Oh yeah if your syringe was getting stiff you can put some silicone on the piston that will loosen it right up

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I'd say it depends on how much ink you're transferring. Those look YUGE (relative to the needle), maybe appropriate for bulk filling sample vials but overkill for a standard short cartridge, I'd think. While you should definitely achieve some suction by squeezing it, it looks more like it's intended to be filled through the neck, the cap screwed on, then squeezed to squirt the contents out. Blunt syringes are cheap enough on Amazon. I got a 10-pack for $6 last August and I'm still on the first one.

It's hard work to tell which is Old Harry when everybody's got boots on.

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Ink transfer ? From bottle-to-bottle, I use a funnel. From bottle to cartridge, I use a 2.0 ml syringe, with a 20 ga needle. Syringes have strong suction, can produce a strong stream of fluid, and are easy to clean. After a few dozen uses, the piston can be tight. Lubrication is an option. Replacement is an option, as well.

 

Medical syringes are manufactured "STERILE". Even unused and unopened, the "STERILE" certification expires after one year. Such syringes are no longer usable for medical purposes, but are clean, new, and very cheap. For $11, we five divided a box of 100 expired syringes. I use them for filling and cleaning ink cartridges, lubricating electric motors, and stabbing home invaders. :angry:

 

Repeated squeezing can result in cracking, and leaking. Cost and intended function are of consideration. I have no way to judge the dimensions by photo. Is the device intended to deliver fountain-pen-practical quantities, or tiny droplets of liquid in the lab ? I don't think "suction" is part of its intended function. If the "blunted" needle is removed for filling, a syringe might be needed for filling. :rolleyes:

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

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I have not used the item in the photo, but If ink bottles are made that way it would be easy to refill carts :D

 

I used syringes to refill empty carts/eye dropper pens but found it to be a little difficult. So I got a pack of plastic transfer pipette, which are easier to use and clean, and they can be used a long time, even if they are named disposable.

Edited by Miaxina
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First, from where to where are you transferring, and how much ink are you transferring?

 

I use a plastic squeeze pipette that I got from my local art store in a bag of 10. I use it to transfer from bottle to ink vial.

 

I only use a syringe to load/fill cartridges, where I need the small needle to get into the hole.

Edited by ac12

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

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Eye dropper:

 

Ali Express

3 ml plastic transparent pipettes

100 pieces

 

Less then $ 3,- including shipping!

 

I love these ones...

 

Oops, and before fundamentalist environmentalists starts shouting...

you can rinse them, keep the lot you need and give the rest to fellow fountain pen users...

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Buy em'. Buy every ink transfer implement you can. Buy the Visconti inkwell. Buy the Twsbi vac inkwells and everything else you can find. Oh yeah if your syringe was getting stiff you can put some silicone on the piston that will loosen it right up

 

+1. I regularly lube the inky syringes that I use frequently. :)

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Am I the only one who's bold (read: lazy) enough to pour ink from the bottle directly into a sample vial?

I can make a mess with a syringe as it is :o You're a brave or foolhardy soul :unsure:

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I use a medical syringe for filling international cartridges. Pilot and Platinum cartridges can be refilled using pipettes. I also use pipettes for most ink transfer to vials. I fill pens only from vials, to reduce the chance of cross-contaminating with SITB. Pipettes can also be heat sealed and used to mail ink samples, and are easier to mail than sample vials.

Edited by Arkanabar
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I was ready to purchase the item in the photo, but then I wondered, does it have enough suction to suck ink in?

If you have experience with this either way, please reply.
The reason I chose this rather than a syringe is that syringes become increasingly tight/dry over time, at least in my limited experience.

 

I was given a couple of those. They will work. I have not used them extensively, so I don't know if they'll work for a long time.

 

I have been using plastic syringes for about the entire 21st Century to refill cartridges, and sometimes to fill smaller bottles from larger ink bottles. When they get a bit stiff I put some silicone grease on the edges of the rubber part and it works just fine again.

 

I've recently decanted a bunch of Chesterfield plastic ink bottles into glass bottles (~ 100 mL to ~100 mL) using mostly a funnel.

 

So, yes, the devices in the photo will work, I don't know how long lived they'll be, however.

 

As for pipettes, I really should try some of those one day.

On a sacred quest for the perfect blue ink mixture!

ink stained wretch filling inkwell

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I have not used the item in the photo, but If ink bottles are made that way it would be easy to refill carts :D

 

I used syringes to refill empty carts/eye dropper pens but found it to be a little difficult. So I got a pack of plastic transfer pipette, which are easier to use and clean, and they can be used a long time, even if they are named disposable.

 

Is this what you mean? :)

Squeeze the top to refill carts

post-136513-0-46079100-1494540384.jpg

post-136513-0-18634700-1494540396.jpg

post-136513-0-94620200-1494540405.jpg

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I like ink syringes that you can get from ipenstore or goulet. They are also handy for cleaning or refilling. Also sometimes you get syringes for liquid pet medicine from the vet, minus the blunt needle of course. Best, Ron

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Is this what you mean? :)

Squeeze the top to refill carts

 

That process looks rather Rube Goldberg. Those look like 10 mL bottles. I have some of those too :blush: , Given the complicated arrangement I see in that graphic I would not feel comfortable trying to refill cartridges with all of that ink in back of the mechanism.

On a sacred quest for the perfect blue ink mixture!

ink stained wretch filling inkwell

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Am I the only one who's bold (read: lazy) enough to pour ink from the bottle directly into a sample vial?

Depends on the bottle - those with a narrow neck, yes. Those with a wide neck, well I might try it over the kitchen sink.

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Thanks! A surprising consensus on the pipettes, which I shall order.

Hey do you mind sparing a couple of them for me. :") Thanks ahead!

Pete :")

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That process looks rather Rube Goldberg. Those look like 10 mL bottles. I have some of those too :blush: , Given the complicated arrangement I see in that graphic I would not feel comfortable trying to refill cartridges with all of that ink in back of the mechanism.

 

Haha it might look complicated, but it's not, that's how they sell ink samples in Taiwan :)

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