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Hey all! Five years after joining I finally got a FP and I love it. I always print (all caps) regardless of pen type, but would like to relearn cursive. I learned it in the third grade (many, many moons ago) and haven't used it since. I went through several topics on these forums but couldn't find a good guide on how to actually make the letters in cursive. I know "cursive" can be a gazillion things -- I'm using a Pilot Metropolitan medium nib -- and I'm not looking to do anything super fancy; just neat, fluid writing to increase my speed.

 

All I could find searching here and on Google were guide sheets that didn't show how to make the letter, just how to space them horizontally and vertically. Could any of you please suggest a resource that I could print a bunch of copies of (for free, preferably) to practice my cursive letters? I remember a handful of them, but trying to connect them looks like a train wreck on my paper :P

 

For clarification, what I'm talking about is business script (I think). No shading necessary since my nib isn't flexible. If there are other styles I've somehow overlooked that may be better, please enlighten me! But, again, I'm not looking for calligraphy-level penmanship -- just a fluid, legible, and good looking form of "cursive."

 

Many thanks,

engel556

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I recommend getting some French ruled paper and checking out this video (I think I did a screen capture from the start of the video where she has all the letters written out and used that as a template):

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NinthSphere

I've only skimmed through it, but Palmer's Guide might be a beneficial read for you.

 

edit: or this, which is D'Nealian. I believe this is what I was taught in elementary, although I've made a few changes to it over time. A bit difficult finding letter guides with stroke instruction.

 

1200px-Cursive.svg.png

 

edit the second: Or this from Envato Tuts+

cursive-calligraphy-uppercase-letters.jp

cursive-calligraphy-lowercase-alphabet1.

Edited by NinthSphere
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dieyen_dualpen

Hello engel556!

 

I have been studying the Palmer Method of Business Handwriting for a couple years on and off, and now I teach the art of ambidextrous penmanship in the classroom.

 

I found that in the past 5 years or so of learning to write in mirror image with my left hand, I greatly improved my ability to write forward with my right hand.

 

Ambidextrous penmanship can be quite a novel and seemingly useless skill but I teach it as a part of my Creative Brain Training program so you can practice knowing that you're not only going to improve your handwriting but also the health of your brain!

 

If you're interested I'll link you a video HERE where I give you some basics on how to begin developing ambidexterity through penmanship.

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Go to the Iampeth web site, into the rare books section, and look for the business writing instruction books. As I recall there are several.

 

But I would not use the grip they use. The grip in many of the books are based on using a dip pen with a straight holder, so somewhat similar to a fountain pen. But the pen angle is held in line with the downstroke. This pretty much REQUIRES arm writing. This grip is very different than the currently use tripod grip. I find the tripod grip more comfortable.

Edited by ac12

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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Sasha Royale

No cursive in front of ladies and children. :rolleyes:

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

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NS

That is a good instruction sheet.

I too had to SEARCH for instruction sheets, when I decided to relearn writing, about 5 years ago. I had actually forgotten some of the standard letter forms.

 

I like the 2nd with the non-Palmer Q and Z. I always disliked the Palmer Q and Z, especially the Q.

What is so difficult about making an O with a slash? No they had to go and make up a new letter form that does not even look like a Q.

I like the Z in the instruction sheet. I think I will adopt it.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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Sorry for the late reply everyone -- it's finals week so I've been quite busy. Thanks for suggesting so many different resources! My favorite is the one from Envato Tuts+. I really like that it shows which direction to make the strokes and how many total strokes per letter (yes, it's been that long for me). All of them are very helpful, though! I will likely wind up using some type of combination of styles. Like you ac12, I don't understand why the Q needs to be a completely different letterform in some cases.

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Sailor Kenshin

I recommend getting some French ruled paper and checking out this video (I think I did a screen capture from the start of the video where she has all the letters written out and used that as a template): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqKus6lMZsY&t=7s

 

Cool! Thanks.

 

What is that black pen she's using?

My other pen is a Montblanc and...

 

My other blog is a tumblr.

 

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Cool! Thanks.

 

What is that black pen she's using?

 

You're welcome.

 

I'm not sure - it looks like a TWSBI to me...

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I was thnking the same, but the nib looks...different-y.

 

:) I thought so too - more like a Platinum? nib, but I can't think of a Platinum pen that looks like that. :unsure:

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FordPrefect8

I've only skimmed through it, but Palmer's Guide might be a beneficial read for you.

 

edit: or this, which is D'Nealian. I believe this is what I was taught in elementary, although I've made a few changes to it over time. A bit difficult finding letter guides with stroke instruction.

 

1200px-Cursive.svg.png

 

edit the second: Or this from Envato Tuts+

cursive-calligraphy-uppercase-letters.jp

cursive-calligraphy-lowercase-alphabet1.

 

Whoah! This is incredibly useful! Thanks :)

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Dear all,

 

I've been a lurker for a long time. Thanks for all the suggestions above. I'm off to find some better ruled paper today at my local shop.

 

I use a Pilot VP at work most of the time for convenience (stub nib). I also have a Waterman Carene (medium), Pelikan M805 (Stub customization), Pelikan M205 en route, and Pelikan M100 (Fine) that I use from time to time. These are obviously of a variety of writing characteristics and weights. Anyone have any thoughts on what weight pen is most effective when working on handwriting? Not to live up to stereotypes, but I am an MD with an appropriately horrible chicken scratch. I love my FP's, and want my handwriting to live up to the instruments with which I write.

 

I just started the Palmer Method lessons with my Waterman because it has better inkflow than my VP, but I am tempted to fill up one of my piston fillers given the amount of paper I'm working through.

 

Thanks,

b

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A few thoughts.

 

Note on the samples that NS posted, that there is a broken line in the middle of the 2 solid lines. This is the X-height, or the height of the lower case letters like a,m,o,s, etc. Either get a paper with a x-height line or draw it in with a pencil and ruler. This helps to get your lower case letters more even in height. As you get better, you can 'imagine' the x-height line, so you won't have to draw it in.

 

In the beginning of those old instruction books, are excercises; loops, humps, etc. I think those excercises are quite valuable to get your hand/arm used to moving like they have to. So don't skip them. I skipped them and it took me longer to relearn to write.

 

When you practice, get a notebook and TRY to practice at least 30 minutes a day, better 2x a day (morning and evening). The more you practice, the more your muscles get used to writing.

BUT, practice makes perfect, only if it is perfect practice. IOW if things are not clicking you are TIRED, your arm is sore, etc, just don't practice, because otherwise you would be reinforcing BAD practice.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com

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Your Jedi mind tricks don't work on me. On the other hand, i think ill write something in italic and maybe buy a really expensive fountain pen.....

 

34368970546_59be8eff47.jpg

HAVE A GREAT DAY!!!

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Although I have a MB, it's a rollerball and was a gift. I don't carry it in my white coat. Though I like MB pens, I'd rather go under the radar and not have a MB 149 in my pocket. For the same reason, I tend not to carry gold pens. Few people even notice that my VP is a fountain pen.

 

As for writing, I mainly take notes while talking to patients. It's not for posterity - we have to do everything in an electronic record these days. I actually like the Palmer look, so I'm going with that.

 

My original question was whether anyone had suggestions as to whether the heft of a FP matters when re-learning cursive? I've been using a Waterman Carene, but am going to use one of my Pelikans at some point. I can ink them all, but prefer to have 2 or less going at any given time.

 

Thanks,

b

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