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How To Identify This Pelikan Pen?



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Hello Everyone!

First I want to apologize for my bad english. Im new at this site and the world of fountain pens wich I want to enjoy for a long time.

 

I found among my belongins a pen I remember I bought perhaps back in the 80ts and then forgot it. Its a Pelikan but I cant find anywhere wich model is this one or about what year did this one really appeared.

 

The body is all black plastic and has a blue translucid part between the two componens. The cap is (I think) steel. The Pelikan logo is at the top of the clip but the clip itself has no engraving at all except for the words pelikan germany around the bottom of the cap. The logo is also seen at the nib.

 

I couldnt find any information about this pen anywhere. Hope someone here can help me identify this one.

Thank you very much!!

 

Gisela

 

 

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Yes, same as mine. Keep that link on your favourites bar. If you like old Pelikans you will use it a lot.

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Bo Bo Olson

Geha was the first German company to do a cartridge pen in Germany.

 

I do have three cartridge pelikans, two Celebries...one gold nib, the other steel; a 381 and all three of the nibs are = to a 'Germany M400', '90-97 or a 200. They are all 'true' regular flex.

 

I don't know what flex your pen has. It was from a time I didn't chase.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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Geha was the first German company to do a cartridge pen in Germany.

 

I do have three cartridge pelikans, two Celebries...one gold nib, the other steel; a 381 and all three of the nibs are = to a 'Germany M400', '90-97 or a 200. They are all 'true' regular flex.

 

I don't know what flex your pen has. It was from a time I didn't chase.

I will post a picture of the nib.. perhaps there are more clues for identifying it. :)

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Hey everyone!

In order to end this thread about the misterious ID of my Pelikan pen (now found :P ) I will attach a picture of its writing ...

after 40 years not being used..this is pretty amazing!!

 

Trying to remember where did I get this pen, I finally recalled that I purchased it in Germany during a school year I did at a boarding school in Bavaria. I remembered that all students at that commercial high school had to use a fountain pen. I attended that school in Diessen am Ammersee during 1976-1977, therefore I purchased it during that time.

 

Best regards to all

 

Gisela

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Bo Bo Olson

Gisela, it is very hard to tell what flex a nib has by pictures.

As far as I can tell, all German pen companies that made semi-flex stopped by '72, witht he Geha 725's end.

 

In no one bragged his spade nib or other nib of his Pelikan as semi-flex, having LOM, chased those made between '50-65; the semi-flex era.

 

What other pens do you have?

From when.

 

I don't know Pelikans between '66 and '82 and the M-400. Mine of that era is '90-96...in it is tortoise. that model of the M-400 with no ring ended in '97 green stripped.

Those after '97 (outside the 'true' regular flex 200/215) I don't chase either in the nib of the 400/600 is a semi-nail.

The springy 'true' regular flex is a nice ride, a cleaner line than the fat and blobby made for Ball Point Barbarian ball point user, semi-nail.

 

Once the old style regular flex was normal issue for many pen companies. But now normal issue of many companies is nail or semi-nail so they don't have to repair ham fisted Barbarian's bent nibs.

 

I would expect....but don't know that your nib is the old style regular flex.

I asked which pens you had in others can perhaps say if that or those pens were regular flex or not.

It can be confusing. Early '50's Sheaffers, came in a 'semi-flex', regular flex and nail.

US Parker was a known nail company....though because of the more flexible row of Swan nibs, both Parker and Sheaffer made nibs of semi-flex in their British Factory. I have an English Parker Jr. Duofold, in semi-flex and an Australian Sheaffer in maxi-semi-flex.

 

So if one of your other pens is regular flex....the nib can be mashed 3X a light down stroke, then you can compare....or mash your 474.

 

Semi-nail will only give 2X.........

 

Nail....if very, very strong...1 1/4th.

 

(one of the reasons why some nail users sometimes think a regular flex is a semi-flex....in they are not use to a nib spreading it's tines at all.)

 

Do keep in mind, every nib will flex....once. :angry: ....Richard Binder's com is the bible of fountain pens; nibs, filling systems, good advice on ink & very pretty pens. :puddle:

He has a fine article of how to spring your nib. $$$$$. That is a 100% need to read.

Once 97 1/2% of all I knew came from Richard's site. Now it's only 92 1/2%. After all after 7 years one should learn something. :happyberet:

 

Perhaps someone with Pelikans from that era can chip in to know if old regular flex or semi-nail.

 

In Lamy had the nail market locked up, I'd not expect Pelikan to have been nail then.

When the Sovereign came in in 1982, it had a very good springy regular flex nib.

So good it was the fabled W. Germany nib....the slight tad better than the '90-97 (and later with the Celebry and 200) Germany regular flex nib.

 

The most important thing is that it writes well, the pen is well balanced.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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