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So, Im new to fountain pens, and I was was wondering what would be a good fountain pen for drawing and sketching? I have seen in other websites that for someone new to this the lamy safari and pilot metro are kind of the way to go, but i really dont like these all that much. I dont want a pen exclusively for drawing, but I am gonna use it for that a lot. My budget would be around $100 but the price varies here in my country with some pens.

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Rotring art pens are very good.

They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick

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This depends upon the line width you want to use. You might want a pen with easily changeable nibs that have low cost, if you want several line widths. For that reason the Lamy Safari is a decent choice. Also, Esterbrook, Sheaffer No Nonsense. Consider the ink to be used. If you are going to use a permanent ink or a waterfast ink, consider a lower cost pen in case the ink ruins the pen. No sense buying a hundred dollar pen and having to then replace it. I use a Cross Solo fine, which is really extra fine. I use Montblanc black ink in it, and it the lines are washed away by watercolor washes, so be it.

Edited by pajaro

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

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I use Sheaffer 100 and Intensity for my drawings, try to test different pens and see what works for you.

 

Best regards.

Recite, and your Lord is the most Generous  Who taught by the pen

Taught man that which he knew not (96/3-5)

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Aloha Alphaleo,

 

As an architect, one that I like to use is a Pilot Falcon with SF nib. I like it because you can get a wide variety of line widths, from extra fine to decent broad. I like it because it is fairly robust and light weight so it makes controlling line weight easier. Drawback is ink capacity, but for me, I don't mind as I carry sample vials full of ink. I find having to refill often is actually a positive for me as it gives me a mental break.

 

As an alternative, I also like using disposable Pilot Varsity pens. They are robust, inexpensive so if I lose one, no worries. The pen writes on a many types of paper and has good ink capacity. Drawback is it only comes in a medium nib. That said, it is Japanese medium so line weight is a little thinner.

 

Both pens I also use for writing, much for the same reasons. Good luck on your quest.

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Thank you all, for your responses. I have another question though, I have read a lot that some times the fine and extra fine nibs scrach the paper, so my question would be if this is true with any particular pen or paper?, and what would you recomend about it? Im asking this because i want to get a pen with fine or extra fine nib. Thanks.

 

I use Sheaffer 100 and Intensity for my drawings, try to test different pens and see what works for you.

 

Best regards.

 

 

This depends upon the line width you want to use. You might want a pen with easily changeable nibs that have low cost, if you want several line widths. For that reason the Lamy Safari is a decent choice. Also, Esterbrook, Sheaffer No Nonsense. Consider the ink to be used. If you are going to use a permanent ink or a waterfast ink, consider a lower cost pen in case the ink ruins the pen. No sense buying a hundred dollar pen and having to then replace it. I use a Cross Solo fine, which is really extra fine. I use Montblanc black ink in it, and it the lines are washed away by watercolor washes, so be it.

 

 

Rotring art pens are very good.

 

 

Aloha Alphaleo,

As an architect, one that I like to use is a Pilot Falcon with SF nib. I like it because you can get a wide variety of line widths, from extra fine to decent broad. I like it because it is fairly robust and light weight so it makes controlling line weight easier. Drawback is ink capacity, but for me, I don't mind as I carry sample vials full of ink. I find having to refill often is actually a positive for me as it gives me a mental break.

As an alternative, I also like using disposable Pilot Varsity pens. They are robust, inexpensive so if I lose one, no worries. The pen writes on a many types of paper and has good ink capacity. Drawback is it only comes in a medium nib. That said, it is Japanese medium so line weight is a little thinner.

Both pens I also use for writing, much for the same reasons. Good luck on your quest.

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Hi,

 

I now include a Sailor DE with a Fude nib to deal with instances where variable nib/line width is advantageous. I write with Blue-Black, and draw with R&K Sepia in the DE.

 

Bye,

S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

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Aloha Alphaleo,

 

I have not had a problem with the Pilot Falcon SF being scratchy. Like you, I too prefer fine nibs; I only have one extra fine, though it is on a vintage Schaeffer. That one has a tendency to catch on the paper surface if I write too fast. It has a FX5 Triumph flex nib; I just learned to slow down when I write. The benefit is the differential between the super fine line and the flexed broad line is well worth the effort.

 

Good luck.

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For drawing and desk work I like the Platinum Desk Pen with Platinum Carbon Black. I also use Lamy Safari pens in various nib sizes. But if the Lamy doesn't suit you you might be well served by the Pilot Metro... inexpensive, great pen. Looks nice and businesslike too, if you need to put it in the pocket and take it away from the desk. Love 'em (and have five or six).

"Inspiration exists, but it has to find you working." -Pablo Picasso


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For drawing and desk work I like the Platinum Desk Pen with Platinum Carbon Black. I also use Lamy Safari pens in various nib sizes. But if the Lamy doesn't suit you you might be well served by the Pilot Metro... inexpensive, great pen. Looks nice and businesslike too, if you need to put it in the pocket and take it away from the desk. Love 'em (and have five or six).

Ok, so the Pilot Metro is starting to convince me a bit, but is it really that good?, also what do you say about monteverde pens?

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Aloha Alphaleo,

 

I have not had a problem with the Pilot Falcon SF being scratchy. Like you, I too prefer fine nibs; I only have one extra fine, though it is on a vintage Schaeffer. That one has a tendency to catch on the paper surface if I write too fast. It has a FX5 Triumph flex nib; I just learned to slow down when I write. The benefit is the differential between the super fine line and the flexed broad line is well worth the effort.

 

Good luck.

Ok, what do you think of monteverde pens?

thanks a lot.

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My question is: what sort of paper are you using? A sketch pad, which tend to have a very toothy surface, may not be very satisfying to work on. To get the most out of any fountain pen you'll want a smooth paper, and not that cheap copy stuff, either.

If you're buying a modern pen, it's not going to have much flex (I tried a latter-day Wahl-Eversharp at the LA Pen Show and was actually impressed with its flex, but that's a fortune!) so I'd suggest a pen on the finer side, but not too fine. I dislike too chiseled a nib, too, because the edges will catch on the paper and it interferes with the spontaneity of drawing.

As soon as your income allows it, go vintage flex. Totally worth seeking out the right instrument. I lucked into a great drawing pen by putting disparate pieces together. If you're interested enough, you'll fall down the rabbit hole into obsession.

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My question is: what sort of paper are you using? A sketch pad, which tend to have a very toothy surface, may not be very satisfying to work on. To get the most out of any fountain pen you'll want a smooth paper, and not that cheap copy stuff, either.

If you're buying a modern pen, it's not going to have much flex (I tried a latter-day Wahl-Eversharp at the LA Pen Show and was actually impressed with its flex, but that's a fortune!) so I'd suggest a pen on the finer side, but not too fine. I dislike too chiseled a nib, too, because the edges will catch on the paper and it interferes with the spontaneity of drawing.

As soon as your income allows it, go vintage flex. Totally worth seeking out the right instrument. I lucked into a great drawing pen by putting disparate pieces together. If you're interested enough, you'll fall down the rabbit hole into obsession.

Im using a Cansons sketch book, I do want a fine nib but I dont really know where to start with a pen. There are many great things about the pilot metro (which seems really attractive since it is so cheap) and the lamy safari online, but I dont realy like them that much. I would like a nicer looking pen thats not too expensive but i dont really know what too expect from different pens and so.

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If there's any place in your town that sells fountain pens, or an art store with a stock of dip pens, I'd do some hanging out. Try a lot of different nibs (different papers, too) and see what you like. One of the advantages of going to art school is they force you to use a lot of different tools.

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If there's any place in your town that sells fountain pens, or an art store with a stock of dip pens, I'd do some hanging out. Try a lot of different nibs (different papers, too) and see what you like. One of the advantages of going to art school is they force you to use a lot of different tools.

I would like too do some hanging out as well hahaha, the thing is that in town theres art store or pen shop that sell more than 3 different models of fountain pens, and iin a city nearby there is, but Im realy short on time since I dont even study in the city I live, I will seek an oportunity too go to this other city where there might be a penshot or art shop. Anyway, Thanks a lot!

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What about TWSBi 580 Diamond? That is my main drawing pen and I use Sailor Kiwa-Guro or Platinum Carbon ink in it. Pen has been really joy to draw and EF nib is really smooth. I use Canson sketchbooks too and haven't noticed any problems. Pen is also easily taken apart to clean out and nib can be change easily.

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Ok, so the Pilot Metro is starting to convince me a bit, but is it really that good?, also what do you say about monteverde pens?

 

 

I'm sorry, I have zero experience with monteverde.

 

Do you want a pen primarily to sketch with (do art)? Or do you primarily want to get into fountain pens with a neat one you can also sketch with sometimes? Might be two different pens (I know, I bought a zillion pens before I figured out I wanted to do both :lol: ).

 

I've sketched with lots of different pens and most of them do pretty well. The ones I mentioned are my go-to pens that I use the most and they are always filled with sketching inks. But I've used Parker 45's, Sheaffers of all sorts from dollar pens up, Platinum #3776's, to some of my more expensive Pelikans. What else are you looking for in a pen, and please forgive me if the tone of that comes across wrong? I mean, beyond doing the mechanical task of making nice lines on paper of all sorts, what else do you want the pen to do? Look "good" in a particular way? Vintage? Quite modern? Call attention to itself, or not? You know.

 

My advice is buy something cheap inexpensive and a basic ink or two and then draw like crazy on as many different papers as you can. Then you will learn what it is you need for your art and for your personality. You may find that a Metro or Safari does all the art you want and you don't worry about slapping it into the travel case or backpack... then you can put it down, pick up the monteverde Pelikan or Montblanc and go to the office, or school, or where ever.

"Inspiration exists, but it has to find you working." -Pablo Picasso


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I'm sorry, I have zero experience with monteverde.

 

Do you want a pen primarily to sketch with (do art)? Or do you primarily want to get into fountain pens with a neat one you can also sketch with sometimes? Might be two different pens (I know, I bought a zillion pens before I figured out I wanted to do both :lol: ).

 

I've sketched with lots of different pens and most of them do pretty well. The ones I mentioned are my go-to pens that I use the most and they are always filled with sketching inks. But I've used Parker 45's, Sheaffers of all sorts from dollar pens up, Platinum #3776's, to some of my more expensive Pelikans. What else are you looking for in a pen, and please forgive me if the tone of that comes across wrong? I mean, beyond doing the mechanical task of making nice lines on paper of all sorts, what else do you want the pen to do? Look "good" in a particular way? Vintage? Quite modern? Call attention to itself, or not? You know.

 

My advice is buy something cheap inexpensive and a basic ink or two and then draw like crazy on as many different papers as you can. Then you will learn what it is you need for your art and for your personality. You may find that a Metro or Safari does all the art you want and you don't worry about slapping it into the travel case or backpack... then you can put it down, pick up the monteverde Pelikan or Montblanc and go to the office, or school, or where ever.

I guess I want to do both too hahaha, as for what else I want on the pen, I want something that looks modern or retro look but not really too flashy. the problem is that some of those seem to be a bit expensive. I will take your advice and see what happens, thanks a lot!

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What about TWSBi 580 Diamond? That is my main drawing pen and I use Sailor Kiwa-Guro or Platinum Carbon ink in it. Pen has been really joy to draw and EF nib is really smooth. I use Canson sketchbooks too and haven't noticed any problems. Pen is also easily taken apart to clean out and nib can be change easily.

Unfortunately that one is not available where I live. thanks anyway!

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