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Have I Been An Idiot?


TradeWind
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You're never going to sell a limited edition Lamy Safari for a king's ransom. I would just use the pen and enjoy it. That's what it's for.

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy. Hamlet, 1.5.167-168

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What good is a "gift" you don't use? It's not like this is a work of art meant to sit under a "banker's light".

 

What brings more joy? A never used gift that you sell for a modest 'profit' years later or, a gift that looks well used because you put it to work and used it enough to demonstrate it was a valued tool to you?

On a quest for better pencils and pens in rural East Texas. :)

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Use it in good health~!

 

I have both a Neon Lime and a Neon Coral Lamy that I use every day.

Though I'm jealous of the dark lilac...

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I got a Safari for my birthday in August last year, a Dark Lilac. Considering the fact that it's rare, should I have just kept it aside and used my other pens and not have used it as an everyday workhorse?

 

No you should have done exactly what you have done and used and enjoyed it. :) I use my Copper Al-Star all of the time and that was also an LE.

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To be honest, if I gave a pen as a gift and it was never used, I'd

be a little upset.

 

This. Above all else, this.

 

* Although I must admit from the OPs language I was unsure if they received it as a gift, or bought it for themselves for their birthday.

"The Great Roe is a mythological beast with the head of a lion and the body of a lion, but not the same lion."

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To each his own, I would feel terrible if I didn't use it.

"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

 

B. Russell

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I will repeat myself.

I will repeat myself.

If you are not going to use the pen, it is just for looking. Take some photographs. Sell the pen, and look at the beautiful photographs. Otherwise, INK THAT DARLIN' AND FLY !

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

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There appear to be plenty of Dark Lilac Safari fountain pens available. I wonder how limited it is. The blasted ink was gone quickly, though.

 

 

Pens, like other things, are for whatever you want to do with them. Some people collect things and do not use them. Some people like to use the pens they buy. Some people seem to believe that you must use a pen to write with, and not keep it unused as a collectible.

 

Life is too short to worry about stuff like this. Someday you younger people will realize this. Or not.

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What does a new in box Safari go for in ten years? $50?

I ride a recumbent, I play go, I use Macintosh so of course I use a fountain pen.

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What does a new in box Safari go for in ten years? $50?

 

It is hard to answer a speculative question like that. Factors come into play such as the popularity of the color or how rare it is. The blue green was a limited edition initially but is now a standard color. Not sure why anyone would pay an inflated price for the older limited edition when it can be easily obtained in the first purchase market at standard pricing. Certain pens that were only offered in certain markets can draw higher values. Some of the pens only offered in Asian markets can draw higher values keeping in mind that those values in no way match the pricing for the pen brands like MontBlanc. As stated by previous posters, no one will be retiring from selling an older Lamy limited edition pen. I hope that helps.

Lamb South

 

True Beauty is when a kindly word encourages and brings an unexpected smile.

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What does a new in box Safari go for in ten years? $50?

Like Lamb South said above... it's hard to say. The orange and aquamarine LE's get steep prices... as do the original releases, (terra cotta and olive green).

 

However, the dark lilac didn't sell out that quickly... the Goulets still had them at their site as recently as last month, (and I've seen them elsewhere, not that long ago); so despite all the clamour for a supposedly long awaited purple Safari; the pens weren't as nearly as popular as the ink.

 

I think a mint replacement at a reasonable price will not be that difficult to find. :)

 

- Anthony

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I have used both of the dark lilac Safaris I bought recently. Both have EF nibs. I mixed up two inks to use in them, one a dark violet and one ink a dark purple. When those inks run out I shall mix replacements with different proportions.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

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Like other people here have said: use the pen. The only pens I don't use (at least occasionally) are ones I haven't gotten repaired yet. Oh and the Urban from Hell. Still waffling over the NOS stickered Sheaffer Snorkel I picked up at an antique show a couple of months ago. OTOH, I paid a whole whopping $14 US for it (it's burgundy, but one of the lower end -- non-white dot -- models). I would have paid the price the guy was asking which was, IIRC $22; and the only reason I'm waffling is because it *did* have the nib sticker on the section.

I mean seriously -- it's a Safari! I have pens that cost a LOT more than my Dark Lilac. And they get used, and dragged around places if I think I'm going to need a pen (the only one that doesn't leave the house any more is a vintage Morrison ringtop that likes to unscrew itself from the cap while I have it on the lanyard... :angry:; but it still gets used, because it has such a nice nib).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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There are few places where you can still get the Dark Lilac fountain pens. It was the ink that was hard to get though you can pick up cartridges of it still. I have one and I use it all the time. Using the pen is the best way to get enjoyment out of it.

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As you can see, there those who are strident in their recommendations to use the pen. That would seem to be the majority. Those who save pens just to collect and display them have a whole different mindset about pens. From what I have read all over this site, both think they are right.

 

The pens I have that are in display trays are pens that I don't enjoy using, because they do not work properly, and not because they are broken, except perhaps in manufacture. The Lamy Safari is a very well made pen with nibs that are usually very smooth, if they are adjusted properly. Safaris won't make their way to my failures trays.

 

Still, there are a few pens I keep as display pieces for my own enjoyment. These are mainly special, hard to get pens. I might rarely use them. I will not be a sycophant with the use it people, though, because people are free to do this hobby any way they want to, and shouldn't feel bullied to using every last pen, or else you have to get rid of it.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

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Dont kid yourself pal, a Safari might be worth something significant in 50 years but for the foreseeable future, its not going to rise in value all that much.

 

You see Coral and Neon safaris selling for RRP still and if you are still hesitant about using one, just buy another one online.

 

The price rise will only be a few percentages above inflation rate so I would recommend you to use it.

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Don't worry. My platinum 3776 Century costed me 180$ and I got super glue on it. Still one of my favorite pens. :lol:

 

Oh I'll bet there's a story there.... :rolleyes:

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

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I`ve heard rumors that rarer versions of the Safary will be worth hundreds, if not thousands of dollars in just a few years from now.

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