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Just A Quick Question: How Do I Use An Ink Tablet?



AgnivaRoy

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I recently acquired an antique ink tablet made in India. As this is the first time I have laid my eyes on it, I would like to ask you how to properly use it. I know I have to add it in water but how much water do I use? Also,could it pose any threat to the pen if I use it?

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It depends on the age of the tablet. I had some which had been made in the USA at the turn of the last century. The instructions recommended dropping one tablet into 1 ounce {approximately 28 grammes} of warm water, It did state that it was safe for a fountain pen. However when it was dissolved the color had somewhat faded.

 

With the one you have acquired depending on its age I would suggest starting with a third of the 1 ounce or 28 grammes and see how the color looks and writes with a dip pen. Usually these tablets are not recommended for use in modern fountain pens. Although I believe Waterman did make an ink tablet during World War one which could be placed in an eyedropper pen and filled with water then shaken up. Otherwise they were just a convenient way for travelers carrying dip pens.

They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick

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amberleadavis

Pickwick, thank you for the detailed instructions.

 

Agniva, I've purchased some of these ... well more than 3 different kinds .... Not all of the tablets work well in fountainpens. So, 1. Choose an easy to clean pen. 2. Dilute this in a vial or sample container with very little HOT water. You can always add more water, but taking out water is not easy. Also hot water makes it much easier to mix. 3. Consider adding the tablet to another ink which already has antimicrobials and surfactants. If the tablet does not dissolve easily and instead looks like it is chunky, do not put it into a fountain pen. The chunks will clog your pen.

 

I hope that helps.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).



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Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 366 Inks in 2016



Check out inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

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Pickwick, thank you for the detailed instructions.

 

Agniva, I've purchased some of these ... well more than 3 different kinds .... Not all of the tablets work well in fountainpens. So, 1. Choose an easy to clean pen. 2. Dilute this in a vial or sample container with very little HOT water. You can always add more water, but taking out water is not easy. Also hot water makes it much easier to mix. 3. Consider adding the tablet to another ink which already has antimicrobials and surfactants. If the tablet does not dissolve easily and instead looks like it is chunky, do not put it into a fountain pen. The chunks will clog your pen.

 

I hope that helps.

 

Do these contain basic similar ingredients to the packets of dye that you had a while ago?

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amberleadavis

It's hard to say. Not all the batches of powered ink or the tablets are from the same country or time period, so I would doubt that the ingredients are the same, BUT it seems like ink was a fairly consistent process for hundreds of years.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).



Want to get a special letter / gift from me, then create a Ghostly Avatar



Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 366 Inks in 2016



Check out inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

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It depends on the age of the tablet. I had some which had been made in the USA at the turn of the last century. The instructions recommended dropping one tablet into 1 ounce {approximately 28 grammes} of warm water, It did state that it was safe for a fountain pen. However when it was dissolved the color had somewhat faded.

 

With the one you have acquired depending on its age I would suggest starting with a third of the 1 ounce or 28 grammes and see how the color looks and writes with a dip pen. Usually these tablets are not recommended for use in modern fountain pens. Although I believe Waterman did make an ink tablet during World War one which could be placed in an eyedropper pen and filled with water then shaken up. Otherwise they were just a convenient way for travelers carrying dip pens.

I have a couple of eyedropper pens somewhere in the huge mess that my room is.

Let's see how it pans out.

Edited by AgnivaRoy
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amberleadavis

We look forward to seeing the results.

Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).



Want to get a special letter / gift from me, then create a Ghostly Avatar



Ink comparisons: The Great PPS Comparison 366 Inks in 2016



Check out inks sorted by color: Blue Purple Brown Red Green Dark Green Orange Black Pinks Yellows Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY

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