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What Does I7 On A Parker 45 Mean ?



El Gordo

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OK, it is weird, I own the P45 some 40-50 years and only noticed it today ... The pen has my name engraved (on the barrel), and when I look at my name, o vanity, I can not see the other engraving (on the section close to the barrel on the opposite side of my name. It reads I7 (or 17 sans-serif?) but this does not seem to be in the list of date codes for Parker ? Any idea ?

Ik ontken het grote belang van de computer niet, maar vind het van een stuitende domheid om iets wat al millennia zijn belang heeft bewezen daarom overboord te willen gooien (Ann De Craemer)

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I found this on a website (https://parkerpens.net/parker17.html)

 

During the late 1950's and 1960's the British Parker factory in Newhaven, UK several models and versions of the new Duofolds were produced, aimed at the lower priced market. They were made from the injection molded polystyrene fabrication method that made way for the success of the Parker "45" in which the entire pen could be made up from the same dyes. The Parker "17" all had a version of the aerometric filler, introduced with the new Parker "51" line of the late 1940's. The filler system proved to be reliable and easy to use and really had no competition until the launching of the Parker "45" and the cartridge filler system, frequently used to this day.

 

In 1968 the Lady Standard (ca 134 mm) was announced, similar to the Parker "17" Lady, but sporting a longer section and the Parker "45" clip and the cap ring was situated on the cap lip. It was also a bit longer and more tapered at both ends, again Parker "45" features. custom versions, with 12k rolled gold caps and trim, also exists. The cap grip rings were now made out of black plastic as opposed of the ealier metal ones.I found this on some website:

 

 

I don't know if this answers your question - but there is more information on the webpage which may add to my answer.

Edited by GJMekenkamp
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Where exactly is the '17' inscribed on the pen? And what does the pen look like? These are some of the questions to be answered for identification of the pen. So posting a photo of the pen would be appreciated.

Khan M. Ilyas

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Picture, sorry smartphone, hard to see on the complete pen where the I7 is located, the insert shows it better (yuck, brassing). Made in France if it can be of any help, my estimation is around 1970-71 (but could be wrong).

fpn_1484315214__p45.jpg

Ik ontken het grote belang van de computer niet, maar vind het van een stuitende domheid om iets wat al millennia zijn belang heeft bewezen daarom overboord te willen gooien (Ann De Craemer)

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Your pen is a standard P45GT which my records show start production in 1969.

 

I have a huge collection of P45's none have a marks on the lower shell like this.

Looked on the net - nothing

 

How old were you when this pen was given to you ?

Edited by Slimfish
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Your pen is a standard P45GT which my recorde show start production in 1969.

 

I have a huge collection of P45's none have a marks on the lower shell like this.

Looked on the net - nothing

 

How old were you when this pen was given to you ?

Luckely I am not a lady ... I must have been 11 - likely 12 years old at that time (so 1970-71 when I received it).

Ik ontken het grote belang van de computer niet, maar vind het van een stuitende domheid om iets wat al millennia zijn belang heeft bewezen daarom overboord te willen gooien (Ann De Craemer)

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It was a long shot.

 

As your name was put on barrel I just thought your age may have been added to the lower shell too.

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